Faculty

Katrina Harack

Katrina Harack

Lecturer

Ph.D., English, University of California, Irvine
M.A. Simon Fraser University, Canada

Email: kharack@uw.edu

I am originally from Canada but earned my Ph.D. from the University of California, Irvine, on the topic of ethics and literature in relation to several 20th century American authors. I have published articles on issues of memory, trauma, gender, and ethics in literature, and remain fascinated by the issues of representation surrounding memory, time, and history. I greatly enjoy teaching and have taught courses in upper and lower division writing, introductory literature, American literature, race and ethnicity, and African American literature, as well as travel literature. I am very interested in scholarly theories of subject well being (or happiness), and issues surrounding technology, media, and well being, and how those intersect with social justice issues.

Teaching

I greatly enjoy teaching and have taught courses in upper and lower division writing, introductory literature, American literature, race and ethnicity, and African American literature, as well as travel literature. I am very interested in scholarly theories of subject well being (or happiness), and issues surrounding technology, media, and well being, and how those intersect with social justice issues. My writing classes often focus on such issues, including intersections of race, class, and gender in American society.

Recent Courses Taught

BWRIT 134 (Composition)
BWRIT 135 (Research Writing)
DC II

Research/Scholarship

My most recent research has focused on the novels of Toni Morrison and also issues of gender and the body in women's travel writing. I am also researching aspects of race and technology and social justice issues in relation to technology.

Selected Publications

Harack, Katrina and Aitor Ibarrola. “Trauma, Screen Memories, Safe Spaces, and Productive Melancholia in Toni Morrison’s Home.” Traumatic Memory and the Ethical, Political and Transhistorical Functions of Literature. Eds. Susana Onega, Constanza del Rio and Maite Escudero-Alias. Palgrave MacMillan, 2017, pp. 279-310.

“Shifting Masculinities and Evolving Feminine Power: Progressive Gender Roles in Toni Morrison’s Home.” Mississippi Quarterly 69.3 (Summer 2016): 371-395.

“Not even in the language they had invented for secrets”: Trauma, Memory, and Re-witnessing in Toni Morrison’s Love.” Mississippi Quarterly 66.2 (Spring 2013): 255-278.

“Representing Alterity: The Temporal Aesthetics of Susan Howe and Charles Olson.” Canadian Review of American Studies 43.3 (Summer 2013): 433-461.

“Embedded and Embodied Memories: Body, Space, and Time in Don DeLillo’s White Noise and Falling Man.” Contemporary Literature 54.2 (Summer 2013): 303-336.

“Temporal, Mnemonic, and Aesthetic ‘Eruptions’: Recontextualizing Eliot and the Modern Literary Artwork.” The Yeats/Eliot Review: A Journal of Criticism and Scholarship 26.2 (Summer 2009): 2-15.

“Limning the Impossible: Time Travel, The Uncanny, and Destructive Futurity in H.G. Wells’s The Time Machine.The Wellsian 28 (2005): 28-38.

Reprinted in H. G. Wells's Fin-de-siècle: Twenty-first Century Reflections on the Early H. G. Wells. Ed. John S. Partington. Frankfurt: Peter Lang, 2007.