News & Events

Events

Algorithmic Game Theory of eBay's Buyer-Selling Matching

Friday, April 4, 2014
10:30am-12:00pm
UW1-280

Kamal Jain
 

 

 

 

Abstract

At the broadest level, eBay is an intermediary, who is in the business of matching a buyer and a seller so that they can complete a mutually beneficial transaction. There are two important strategic choices eBay makes. First, how and whom does eBay charge a fee for its services. Two, how does eBay rank the possible product choices for a buyer. In this presentation, we see eBay as a part of the intermediation industry, e.g., Google is in the same business of intermediation where they match buyer-seller (i.e., searcher-advertiser as known in their world) . We compare some of the popular intermediation business-models in the industry. We then ask if the intermediary could choose any business model, which would be a profit maximizing business model. We also try to propose some algorithms to implement these business models.

VPN Gate: A Volunteer-Organized Public VPN Relay System with Blocking Resistance for Bypassing Government Censorship Firewalls

Tuesday, April 1, 2014
6:45-7:45pm
UW2-005

Daiyyuu Nobori
SoftEther

 

 

 

Abstract

VPN Gate is a public VPN relay service designed to achieve blocking resistance to censorship firewalls such as the Great Firewall (GFW) of China. To achieve such resistance, we organize many volunteers to provide a VPN relay service, with many changing IP addresses. To block VPN Gate with their firewalls, censorship authorities must find the IP addresses of all the volunteers. To prevent this, we adopted two techniques to improve blocking resistance. The first technique is to mix a number of innocent IP addresses into the relay server list provided to the public. The second technique is collaborative spy detection. The volunteer servers work together to create a list of spies, meaning the computers used by censorship authorities to probe the volunteer servers. Using this list, each volunteer server ignores packets from spies. We launched VPN Gate on March 8, 2013.  By the end of August it had about 3,000 daily volunteers using 6,300 unique IP addresses to facilitate 464,000 VPN connections from users worldwide, including 45,000 connections and 9,000 unique IP addresses from China. At the time VPN Gate maintained about 70% of volunteer VPN servers as unblocked by the GFW.

About Daiyuu Nobori

Daiyuu Nobori is a software engineer and an entrepreneur.  His development and research interests include systems software such as Virtual Private Network (VPN), distributed systems, and security.  He entered University of Tsukuba in 2003 and started up a company, SoftEther Corporation in 2004.  He received his master's degree in Engineering from University of Tsukuba in 2014.  He is a Ph.D. course student at Department of Computer Science, University of Tsukuba.  In SoftEther Corporation, he has developed SoftEther VPN, a cross-platform multi-protocol VPN program, made it public for free, and opened its source code in 2013.  SoftEther VPN has attracted more than 100,000 users around the world since March 2013.  He is aiming to gain 1,000,000 users of SoftEther VPN in next three years.

Seizure Prediction & Machine Learning

Tuesday, March 11, 2014
8:00-9:00pm
UW1-040

Dr. Jeff Howbert
UW Bothell

 

 

 

Abstract

Epileptic seizures are a common neurological disorder, affecting 1% of the world’s population.  A major source of disability among epileptic patients is uncertainty around when their next seizure will occur, which often leads to anxiety and self-imposed limitations on activities.  This talk describes the first medical device designed for long-term, ambulatory monitoring of brain EEG activity in epileptic patients.  The device includes a real-time advisory system that can predict increases in seizure likelihood up to hours in advance of a seizure.  The latter part of the talk focuses on the speaker’s work developing a second-generation algorithm for the advisory system, using techniques from signal processing and machine learning to create new predictive features and a simple but robust predictive model.  Long-standing issues with the statistical validation of such models will be discussed.

About Jeff Howbert

Jeff Howbert received a BA in English from Stanford Univ. in 1977 and a PhD in Synthetic Organic Chemistry from Harvard Univ. in 1983. Over the ensuing 25 years, he led medicinal chemistry and drug discovery efforts at a large pharmaceutical company and several small biotech companies. He holds 45 US patents and is responsible for the entry of 6 compounds into clinical development. After earning a MS in Computer Science from Univ. of Washington in 2008, he began a second career in computational biology, with an emphasis on machine learning. He has worked in several labs on building predictive models for diverse biomedical problems, including seizure risk, cardiovascular biomarker discovery, and proteomic analysis. He is also currently teaching a course at UW Bothell on machine learning.

Implementing the Security Development Lifecycle in the Real World

Thursday, March 6, 2014
6:45-7:45pm
LBA-003

Don Ankney
Senior Security Researcher
Microsoft

 

 

 

Abstract

The Microsoft Security Development Lifecycle (SDL) was originally designed to codify security lessons learned from building Microsoft Windows and Office. We’re going to talk about real-world experiences implementing the SDL in a very different engineering environment.

About Don Ankney

Don Ankney is a Senior Security Researcher in Microsoft’s Applications and Services Group where he focuses on application and cloud security in a continuous integration/dev ops environment.

Privacy at Google - Life of a Privacy Analysis Engineer

Wednesday, February 19, 2014
3:30-4:30pm
UW2-305

Ivan Medvedev
Google

 

 

 

Abstract

The talk by a Google Privacy Analysis Engineer will overview some of the Privacy focused efforts Google is engaged in and how they affect our users, as well as touching on aspects of Privacy related research

About Ivan Medvedev

Ivan Medvedev leads a privacy engineering team in Google's Kirkland office. Ivan graduated from the Moscow State University in Russia in 1998 with a degree in Computer Science, and for the last 15 years has worked for software industry leaders Microsoft and Google, focusing on security and privacy.

Security in Emerging Environments

Thursday, February 6, 2014
5:45-6:45pm
UW2-031

Dr. Brent Lagesse
Assistant Professor
UW Bothell

Abstract

Many new systems are emerging beyond traditional desktop computing such as sensor systems, mobile systems, vehicular network systems, and wearable computing systems.  These emerging environments exhibit properties that are not accounted for in traditional security models.  For example, these systems are often diverse, mobile, ad-hoc, and consist of resource constrained devices.  This talk will describe several areas of research in emerging environments along with potential solutions that I am actively exploring alongside several student researchers.

About Brent Lagesse

Dr. Lagesse received his Ph.D. in computer science from the University of Texas at Arlington in 2009. Prior to coming to UW Bothell, he held positions as a research scientist in the cyber security research groups at Oak Ridge National Laboratory and BBN Techologies.

Dr. Lagesse's expertise is in the areas of cyber security and pervasive systems. His dissertation research was focused on developing trust in pervasive systems, such as mobile peer-to-peer or dynamic service composition. Through game theoretic techniques, he enabled more reliable and secure access to services and resources in pervasive computing environments. Further, he established a framework for increasing code and information reuse in distributed trust mechanisms and for easing the deployment of these mechanisms. His current research focuses on formal methods, internet voting, device and wireless privacy, and secure online machine learning.

Big Data - A Relative Term

Thursday, November 14, 2013 3:45-4:45pm Presentation
4:45-5:20pm Q&A
UW2 340

Roei Ganzarski
President & COO
BOLDIQ

 

 

 

Abstract

While ‘big data’ is all the hype now, it does not matter how much data you have, rather what you do with it to enhance your operations.

About Mr. Ganzarski

Prior to joining BoldIQ, Roei spent 13 years with the Boeing family of companies, most recently serving as Chief Customer Officer for Boeing’s Flight Services division, a provider to the world’s airlines of products and services to safely and efficiently operate commercial airplanes. In that role Roei was responsible for leading all customer and market facing activity worldwide including: business development, communications, customer service, marketing, sales, sales operations, and strategy. Additionally Roei led the customer engagement culture transformation for the business. Roei’s other key positions with Boeing (including former acquired Alteon and FSB) included Chief Customer Officer Training, Vice President of Sales, Director of Marketing, Director of New Ventures, and Director of Sales and Business Development for Asia-Pacific.

Data Management for Clinical Trials of Medical Devices

Tuesday, October 15, 2013

3:15-3:45pm Refreshments / Networking
3:45-4:45pm Presentation with Q&A
UW2 340

Terrence Sweeney
Vice President Global Clinical Affairs
Philips Healthcare

Andrew Zydel
Senior Manager
Philips Healthcare

 

 

Abstract

Clinical Data Management saves lives!

Properly conducted clinical research using clinical trials ensures that medical devices used in clinics throughout the world are safe and effective. Soundly performed Clinical Data Management helps ensure that clinical research is performed accurately and safely.

This talk will cover an overview of clinical research and the regulatory environment, and then go into a little history lesson of data management, a deep dive into clinical trial operations processes, workflows that use clinical data management, examples of Case Report Forms (CRFs), and typical system architecture. Afterwards you should have a good idea of why and how data management is performed at medical device innovators and manufacturers.

About Mr. Sweeney

Mr. Terrence Sweeney’s career in regulatory affairs began in 1974 as a field biologist for the EPA. He then held the position of Radiological Health and Medical Device Specialist with the FDA. He has directed regulatory affairs departments for Johnson and Johnson, Quantum Medical Systems, Advanced Technology Laboratories, and Philips Healthcare. He is now Vice President Global Clinical Affairs for Philips Healthcare. He has worked with such medical devices as X-ray, MR and CT scanners, nuclear gamma cameras, diagnostic ultrasound equipment, patient monitors and external defibrillators.

He is an Executive Board member of the WBBA and serves on the Advisory Board of the University of Washington College of Medical Sciences, where he’s an instructor for a Master’s program in regulatory and clinical affairs. He is on the Board of the Bothell Biomedical Device Innovation Zone. He represents the U.S. medical device industry on the Steering Committee of the Global Harmonization Task Force of international regulatory authorities.


About Mr. Zydel

Andrew Zydel is a Senior Manager at Philips Healthcare where he has data management responsibilities for clinical trials of medical devices. Prior to working at Philips, Andrew spent nearly 10 years at Merck where he developed custom software for using clinical data in a variety of applications. He also has experience providing clinical data software solutions to hospitals and clinics.

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Eating the Elephant!  Critical Infrastructure Protection: Context & Process

Thursday, August 8, 2013
5:00 - 6:00 pm
UW2-031

Bruce Beebe

 

 

Abstract

In October of 1997 the President’s Commission on Critical Infrastructure Protection
(CIP) published its report “Critical Foundations: Protecting America’s Infrastructures” detailing what was new and unique about the “infrastructure” problem and, in broad terms, pointing a way ahead. This presentation outlines the development of Critical Infrastructure Policy since before that October report. Furthermore, it addresses the impact of culture and other organizational influences on the development of national policy (using CIP as the vehicle), it explains the state of current CIP policy and it recommends an alternative approach to that used today, a network-centric approach more in keeping with the recommendations of the October report’s authors.

About Bruce Beebe

Bruce M. Beebe, Colonel (Retired)
• Former Lecturer in the Master of Strategic Planning for Critical Infrastructure Program
University of Washington Seattle, WA
• Three & one half years as the Senior Strategic Planner for Critical Infrastructure
Protection on the Joint Staff at the Pentagon
• First cyber-terrorism analyst at the Defense Intelligence Agency

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Software Engineering Lessons Learned from 10 years in the Games Industry

Monday, June 3, 2013
8:00 - 9:00 pm
UW1-121

Brendan Walker
AI Engineer
Bungie

Abstract

Software Engineering is a large are complicated topic that means many things to many sub-industries in the field. In this talk, Brendan Walker, goes over engineer lessons learned working on several games over the last ten years. This includes small 6 month "casual" game projects with rapid iteration in a startup company post-college to large AAA titles with over 100 engineers working on them. Topics covered include interesting engineering problems on each game, as well as interesting scheduling, planning and design challenges. Near the end of the talk, Brendan will cover some the interesting AI programming problems he faces on Bungie's next game, "Destiny".

About Brendan Walker

Brendan Walker is a Seattle Area native. He is currently employeed at Bungie as an AI Engineer, specializing in environmental navigation and markup problems on Bungie's upcoming game "Destiny". Brendan attended UW in Seattle where he earned his undergraduate degree in Computer Science and his masters in Industrial Engineering. Brendan has a long time passion for game developement, augmented reality, indie game projects, and other small hardware projects that never get past the first month of tinkering. When he's not tinkering, he's spending time with his wonderful wife Valerie.

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Separated Presentation Patterns for Developing Applications on Windows Platforms

Wednesday, May 29, 2013
3:30 - 4:30pm
UW1-051

Francis Cheung
Lead Developer
Microsoft

Abstract

Developing well tested, maintainable and decoupled applications ford ASP.NET, Windows 8, and Windows Phone can be challenging. Francis will provide an overview of separated presentation patterns that are commonly used such as MVC, MVP, and MVVM as well as why these patterns were developed and how they promote testability and quality.

About Francis Cheung

Francis has been a lead developer for the Microsoft patterns & practices group for more than seven years. Francis has been involved in a diverse array of projects including the Composite Application Guidance for WPF (aka Prism), SharePoint Developer Guidance, Windows Phone Developer Guidance, Mobile Web Development Guidance, and most recently leading the development effort of the Prism for Windows Store Business App Development Guidance project.

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A Framework for Applied Cyber Security Research

Tuesday, January 29, 2013
11:00 am
UW1-370

Sathish Kumar

 

Abstract

The research talk focuses on the design and development of framework that
includes the design and development of algorithms, optimization models,
computational tools, Integrated Static and Dynamic vulnerability analyses
to address cyber security related research problems. The developed research
approach is to take away the complexities of real systems, isolate key
parameters that affect the performance of these systems, and build
mathematical and computational models to better understand the impact of
design parameters on the system as a whole. From application perspective,
the scope of the research deals with solutions to practical problems in
secure cloud Computing, Supply Chain Security, social networks threat
analysis and their Security.

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A Practical Overview of Machine Learning

Wednesday, November 28, 2012
1:15pm
UW1-221

Dr. Arthur Asuncion
Software Engineer
Google

Abstract

Machine learning is an important scientific discipline that has made inroads into virtually every academic field, from biology to business to robotics.

The main goal of machine learning is to automatically learn models from data in order to make accurate predictions.  In this talk, we will give a practical overview of machine learning.  We will discuss supervised and unsupervised learning algorithms and also highlight various applications of machine learning, many of which are already in mainstream use.

About Dr. Asuncion

Dr. Arthur Asuncion received a Ph.D. in computer science from the University of California at Irvine in 2011.  Supported by an NSF Graduate Fellowship, his research focused on large-scale machine learning and efficient statistical inference algorithms for Bayesian models such as topic models and social network models.  Dr. Asuncion has published in a variety of AI/ML venues and also reviews for ML conferences such as NIPS and ICML.

Currently, Dr. Asuncion is a software engineer at Google where he works on a variety of projects relating to machine learning and statistics.

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The Evolution of Microsoft Software Development Practices in the 21st Century

Thursday, November 15, 2012
6:45-7:45pm
UW2-005

Eric Brechner
Development Manager
Microsoft

Abstract

Compared to its current rivals, Amazon, Apple, Google, and Facebook, Microsoft is an old company with old ways of engineering software. Yet Microsoft continues to innovate and slowly gain advantage over its competitors. In this talk, we’ll discuss the ways software development practices at Microsoft have changed over the last decade. We’ll highlight what matters, what doesn’t, and why people are so resistant to altering bad habits.

 

About Mr. Brechner

Eric is the development manager for the Xbox Engineering Fundamentals team. He is widely known within the engineering community as his alter ego, I.M. Wright. Prior to his current assignment, Eric managed development for the Xbox.com web sites, was director of engineering learning and development for Microsoft Corporation, and managed development for a shared feature team in Microsoft Office.

Before joining Microsoft in 1995, Eric was a senior principal scientist at The Boeing Company, and worked in computer graphics and CAD for Silicon Graphics, GRAFTEK, and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. He holds eight patents, published two books, earned a BS and MS in mathematics and a PhD in applied mathematics from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, and is a certified performance technologist. Although Eric shares I. M. Wright’s passion for product, he tries to be a little more tolerant and open-minded.

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How to Crack the Coding Interview: Skills and Strategies for Software Engineers and PMs

Thursday, October 11, 2012
4:30-5:30pm
UW2-031

Gayle Laakmann McDowell
Founder/CEO
CareerCup.com

Abstract

CS interviews are a different breed from other interviews and, as such, require specialized skills and techniques. This talk will teach you how to prepare for coding and PM interviews, what top companies like Google, Amazon, and Microsoft really look for, and how to tackle the toughest programming and algorithm problems. This is not a fluffy be-your-best talk; it is deeply technical and will discuss specific algorithm and data structure topics.

Signed copies of McDowell's Cracking the Coding Interview and The Google Resume will be on sale after the talk. Cracking the Coding Interview is the #1 interview prep book for software engineers. The Google Resume is a broader book to teach people what they need to do to position themselves for a tech job, starting from early in college up through the offer and job performance itself. The books are rated as 5 and 4.5 stars respectively on Amazon.

About Mrs. McDowell

Gayle Laakmann McDowell is the founder and CEO of CareerCup.com and the author of Cracking the Coding Interview and The Google Resume. CareerCup is the leading source of technical interview preparation and provides a free forum with 8000+ technical interview questions, a book, a video, and mock interviews.

Gayle has worked as a Software Engineer for Google, Microsoft and Apple and has extensive interviewing experience on both sides of the table. She has interviewed and received offers from Google, Microsoft, Apple, Amazon, IBM, Goldman Sachs and a variety of other firms, and she has interviewed over 120 candidates at Google and served on its hiring committee.

Gayle holds a BSE and MSE from UPenn in Computer Science, and an MBA from the Wharton School.

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Data Management for Clinical Trials of Medical Devices

Wednesday, October 3, 2012
1:15pm
UW1-221

Terrence Sweeney
Vice President Global Clinical Affairs
Philips Healthcare

Andrew Zydel
Senior Manager
Philips Healthcare

Abstract

Clinical Data Management saves lives!

Properly conducted clinical research using clinical trials ensures that medical devices used in clinics throughout the world are safe and effective. Soundly performed Clinical Data Management helps ensure that clinical research is performed accurately and safely.

This talk will cover an overview of clinical research and the regulatory environment, and then go into a little history lesson of data management, a deep dive into clinical trial operations processes, workflows that use clinical data management, examples of Case Report Forms (CRFs), and typical system architecture. Afterwards you should have a good idea of why and how data management is performed at medical device innovators and manufacturers.

About Mr. Sweeney

Mr. Terrence Sweeney’s career in regulatory affairs began in 1974 as a field biologist for the EPA. He then held the position of Radiological Health and Medical Device Specialist with the FDA. He has directed regulatory affairs departments for Johnson and Johnson, Quantum Medical Systems, Advanced Technology Laboratories, and Philips Healthcare. He is now Vice President Global Clinical Affairs for Philips Healthcare. He has worked with such medical devices as X-ray, MR and CT scanners, nuclear gamma cameras, diagnostic ultrasound equipment, patient monitors and external defibrillators.

He is an Executive Board member of the WBBA and serves on the Advisory Board of the University of Washington College of Medical Sciences, where he’s an instructor for a Master’s program in regulatory and clinical affairs. He is on the Board of the Bothell Biomedical Device Innovation Zone. He represents the U.S. medical device industry on the Steering Committee of the Global Harmonization Task Force of international regulatory authorities.

About Mr. Zydel

Andrew Zydel is a Senior Manager at Philips Healthcare where he has data management responsibilities for clinical trials of medical devices. Prior to working at Philips, Andrew spent nearly 10 years at Merck where he developed custom software for using clinical data in a variety of applications. He also has experience providing clinical data software solutions to hospitals and clinics.

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The University of Washington is committed to providing equal opportunity and reasonable accommodation in its services, programs, activities, education and employment for individuals with disabilities. To inquire about disability accommodations, please contact Rosa Lundborg at Disability Support Services at least ten days prior to the event at 425.352.5307, TDD 425.352.5303, FAX 425.352.5455, or email dss@uwb.edu.