UW Bothell Alert

The SR-522/I-405 exit ramp to the south entrance of the UW Bothell/Cascadia CC campus will be closed beginning Wednesday, Sept. 17 until further notice. Drivers are advised to take the Beardslee exit (195th street) as an alternative.

Details

Faculty and Staff

S. Charusheela

Associate Professor and Associate Dean for Undergraduate Education

B.A. Economics (Honors), University of Delhi
Ph.D. Economics, University of Massachusetts, Amherst

Office: UW2-312
Mailing: Box 358530, 18115 Campus Way NE, Bothell, WA 98011-8246

Editor, Rethinking Marxism
Email: scharusheela@uwb.edu, editor@rethinkingmarxism.org
Internet: www.rethinkingmarxism.org


Teaching

My teaching aims to make the classroom a space for critical thinking and creative experimentation. I organize this in terms of three broad categories: skill development, active learning, and integration of interdisciplinary approaches and materials.  I want my students to be critical thinkers, but beyond that, I want them to gain a sense of themselves as capable producers of knowledge, to inspire them with a passion for learning and knowledge creation in whatever forms work for them. My role is to help them make that journey. I help students acquire skills needed for knowledge production: systematic thinking, a transdisciplinary framework in which they can pull the threads of their arguments together, and the development of reading, writing, and oral capacities. I incorporate a variety of sources and formats for class materials and student work, emphasizing varied modes of producing knowledge.

Research

My scholarship addresses the ontological and epistemological challenges facing feminist analyses of transnational political economy.  At the center of my work is a concern with the issue of subjectivity and agency:  What are the concepts available for analyses of Third World, minority, poor women’s economic, social, and political activities, their subjectification and subjective experience in a transnational context?  What epistemological and ontological frameworks do we deploy for such analyses, and what are the ethical and political possibilities and limits set by these frameworks?  This set of questions frames my transdisciplinary intellectual engagements within Global Studies at the interstices of postcolonial history and theory, transnational feminism, and international development and political economy.

Selected Publications

“Empowering Work?  Bargaining Models Reconsidered.” In D. Barker and E. Kuiper eds. Toward a Feminist Philosophy of Economics. London: Routledge, 2003.
 
“Postcolonial Thought, Postmodernism, and Economics: Questions of Ontology and Ethics.”  In Zein-Elabdin and Charusheela eds. Postcolonialism meets Economics, Routledge, 2004.
  
“The Diaspora at Home” Cultural Dynamics, Vol. 19. no. 2 (October), 2007.

“Social Analysis and the Capabilities Approach:  A Limit to Martha Nussbaum’s Universalist Ethics.”   Cambridge Journal of Economics,  Vol. 33, No. 6, 2009.

“Engendering Feudalism:  Modes of Production Debates Revisited.”  Rethinking Marxism, Vol. 22, no. 3, April 2010.

“Where is the ‘Economy’?  Cultural Studies and Narratives of Emerging Asian Dominance.”  In Paul Smith ed.,  Renewing Cultural Studies, Temple University Press (Forthcoming).