First Year and Pre-Major Program (FYPP)

Autumn 2019 Discovery Core I

AUTUMN 2019 DISCOVERY CORE OPTIONS 

 

10-Credit Discovery Core Options

 

Place and Displacement in the Americas: Human Rights, Culture, and Ethnicity
10 credits

Monday/Wednesday 1:15 PM - 3:15 PM and 3:30 PM - 5:30 PM
B CORE 104A, VLPA and B CORE 107A, I&S - Must select both
Instructors: Julie Shayne and Yolanda Padilla

How do people shape the places in which they live and, in the case of immigrants, reshape their new homes? How do things like race, gender, social class, and national heritage affect peoples’ experiences and places? In this class we'll explore these questions and more through a focus on South, Central, and North American communities. We'll focus on the way collectives and individuals are shaped through everything from hip-hop, to street murals, to mass incarceration, to Native American reservations, to undocumented immigrant status, to homelessness, to transgender identity.

Our Home in the Forest: Ecology, Literature and Culture
10 credits

Tuesday/Thursday 11:00 AM – 1:00 PM and 1:15 PM - 3:15 PM
B CORE 104B, VLPA and B CORE 110D, NW - Must select both
Instructors: Jennifer Atkinson and Warren Gold

Want to get out of the classroom and explore forests near our campus? This class introduces student to forest ecology as well as the forested realms of literature, film, mythology, and Native American storytelling. We take multiple field trips to study forest ecology in our region; meet with local activists; and read about forests in Classical mythology, fairy tales, children's literature, and science fiction. Students also analyze films like "Avatar" and video games featuring Thoreau's classic work Walden. For the final project you will work in teams to make a forest-themed movie blending ecological knowledge with cultural insights. Prepare to have fun and explore the outdoors!

 

10-Credit Linked Classes (DC + Composition class)

 

The Politics and Practice of Yoga
10 credit linked courses

Monday/Wednesday 1:15 PM – 3:15 PM and 3:30 PM - 5:30 PM
B CORE 104C, VLPA  and B WRIT 134K, Composition - Must select both
Instructor: Alice Pederson

According to market research, 28% of all US Americans have "practiced" yoga at one point or another. This is due, in no small part, to the many and varying reasons that it is prescribed and recommended - from building strength and flexibility, to calming down and managing stress, to treating chronic pain and illness, yoga seems to be the modern cure-all. In this class, we will critically examine the roles, meanings, and values of yoga in contemporary US society. Topics will include the arrival of yoga in the US and its acculturation as a primarily non-spiritual practice, the flourishing of the yoga industry, research on neuroscience and the mind, and issues of cultural appropriation, equity, and access in the greater-Seattle yoga community. Students will be expected to participate in the local yoga economy as participant-observers and think critically about their own positions as consumers, researchers, and critics within this thoroughly modern tradition. We will also integrate movement and contemplative practice into our class sessions. Through our analyses and experiences of contemporary yoga, we will mark the process of "discovering" ourselves as college students on this campus. Assignments will lead you to engage with campus resources such as the library, the Writing & Communication Center, and the Qualitative Skills Center, among others.

Our work in Interdisciplinary Writing will extend and add depth to our discussions on yoga. Through the practices of close reading, analyzing, drafting, reviewing, and revising, we will develop the skills necessary to becoming an effective writer for the rest of your college career and hopefully beyond! We will also ask questions about writing itself: who decided what "good writing" is in the first place? How do we know if we're doing it? How does our writing change, depending on audience and context? How can we use genre and conventions to signal and play with what we're trying to say? This class will challenge you to reconsider the role and place of writing in your life, and welcome you to develop a strong sense of yourself as a college writer.

By taking these two courses together, we are able to develop a profounder and more nuanced understanding of the texts and issues that we discuss in B CORE 104. By using rhetorical analysis and setting texts "into conversation," we will deepen our engagement with the material and cultivate our own writerly voices in order to add to the conversation. 

Gender Under Construction
10 credit linked courses

Tuesday/Thursday 8:45 AM - 10:45 AM and 11:00 AM - 1:00 PM
B CORE 107B, I&S and B WRIT 134L, Composition - Must select both
Instructor: Lauren Lichty

From how we dress to how our society is organized, gender is a part of our daily lives. In this class we will explore how gender relates to power, culture, relationships, and our intersecting identities. Through dynamic conversation and a variety of video, audio, and written texts, we will investigate our personal connections, policies and regulations, and campus practices. This class is co-listed with BWRIT 134, which means we have time to slow down, reflect deeply, and develop content that matters to us.

 

5-Credit Discovery Core VLPA Options (some cross-listed as B CORE 110, NW)

 

Literature in the World, The Worlds of Literature
5 credits

Monday/Wednesday 8:45 AM - 10:45 AM
B CORE 104D, VLPA
Instructor: Katherine Voyles

Come explore the power of literature to change the world and the limitations of that power through "Literature in the World and the Worlds of Literature." In this class we'll read three novels, paying special attention to where they put their characters and how those characters move around, to explore how fiction upends social relations as well as how it entrenches hierarchies.

Dead Things & The Art of Fear in the Written and Spoken Word
5 credits

Monday/Wednesday 10:15 AM - 11:35 AM (33% Hybrid)
B CORE 104E, VLPA 
Instructor: Gavin Doyle

Through analysis of classic horror stories and films, this class allows students to investigate the reasons we are drawn to the unknown and the frightening. Selected readings and films will range in period from the Gothic, to the Victorian, and up to present day and will serve as the foundation for class work. 

In addition to historical investigations of the time period and circumstances in which the works were written, performed, or filmed, students will create new works and will perform adaptations of both new and classic works. Students will gain an understanding of how societal changes affect the sort of worries and fears expressed artistically by that period's artists.

The students' creation of new works will mirror the style and theme of classic works, but the subject will reflect present fears of the class allowing students to reflect on issues relevant to communities they are a part of. 

Words, Voice, Movement: Reimagining Performance
5 credits

Monday/Wednesday 11:00 AM - 1:00 PM
B CORE 104F, VLPA
Instructors: Deborah Hathaway

Words, Voice, Movement is a not just a class, it's a community. We'll play games, we'll create original work, and everyone will leave with communication skills that are translatable to any context. No previous performance experience necessary!

Arts and Politics of Walking
5 credits

Tuesday/Thursday 8:45 AM - 10:45 AM
B CORE 104G ,VLPA
Instructors: Jason Lambacher

Through its rhythms, rituals, and kinesthetic linking of mind, body, and space, conscious walking becomes an activity imbued with many types of cultural meaning. The class examines different forms of walking – strolling, hiking, demonstrating, marching, pilgrimage – as mindful ways of being in and moving through the world. The theme of walking also serves as an interdisciplinary platform to explore connections between walking and human evolution, health, cognition, creativity, spirituality, place-based knowledge, environmental protection, urban design and wild trail networks, pedestrian rights, disability rights, citizenship, public space, protest marches, and more.

Understanding the Natural World at the Intersection of Art and Science
5 credits

Tuesday/Thursday 3:30 PM - 5:30 PM
B CORE 104H, VLPA or B CORE 110A, NW - Select one only
Instructor: Gary Carpenter and Salwa Al-Noori

This co-taught 5-credit Discovery Core I course introduces students to the intersection of art and science in developing a deeper understanding of the natural world. The sciences and the arts as valuable research tools have propelled discovery and informed each other throughout history. In anatomy and physiology, the intersection of these disciplines provides a more complete understanding of the close correlation of structure and function in biology. From Leonardo da Vinci's depiction of human anatomy and biological processes through observation and the arts, to Santiago Ramon y Cajalâ's pioneering drawings of brain cells in the field of neuroscience, our history is rich in examples that highlight the collaboration and intersection of science and art. Furthermore, the contribution of artistic perspectives to the understanding of biological science necessitates, in turn, an appreciation for the contribution of science as an inspiration for art.

This course examines the relationship of structure (morphology/anatomy) and function (physiology) through a variety of artistic mediums (drawing, painting, sculpting, graphics, etc.) improving observational skills and enhancing critical thinking.  Creativity and innovation help students address natural world explorations into "why our brains are structured the way they are," "why the inside of the kidney looks like it does," "what allows a plant to breathe" and "what the transport system in plants looks like" and many more such questions. Individual and group projects will culminate in an exhibition highlighting the symbiotic relationship between art and science.  This course brings together a scientist and an artist with a mutual appreciation of these disciplines as research methodologies and meets the FYPP Learning Goals of critical and creative inquiry and communication. 

Seeing is Believing
5 credits

Tuesday/Thursday 3:30 PM – 5:30 PM
B CORE 104I, VLPA
Instructor: Howard Hsu

Through this course we'll examine the phenomenon of light in two ways: 1) as a scientific property and 2) as an art form (e.g. photography). We will explore how scientists and philosophers think about light and how artists use light for personal expression.

Cooking, Community, and Communication
5 credits

Tuesday/Thursday 5:45 PM – 7:45 PM
B CORE 104J, VLPA
Instructor: Ian Porter

As you embark on your college career, you might be concerned about coming to a new place and making friends, or about how to make sure you meet the standards that college professors set for your academic work, or even just making sure you can eat good food while away from your family. This class helps with all three issues! Join the class to learn about the fundamentals of cooking delicious food, how cooking and eating relate to building community, and how to think and communicate well at the college level.

Dead Things & The Art of Fear in the Written and Spoken Word
5 credits

Monday/Wednesday 3:30 PM - 5:30 PM
B CORE 104K, VLPA 
Instructor: Gavin Doyle

Through analysis of classic horror stories and films, this class allows students to investigate the reasons we are drawn to the unknown and the frightening. Selected readings and films will range in period from the Gothic, to the Victorian, and up to present day and will serve as the foundation for class work. 

In addition to historical investigations of the time period and circumstances in which the works were written, performed, or filmed, students will create new works and will perform adaptations of both new and classic works. Students will gain an understanding of how societal changes affect the sort of worries and fears expressed artistically by that period's artists.

The students' creation of new works will mirror the style and theme of classic works, but the subject will reflect present fears of the class allowing students to reflect on issues relevant to communities they are a part of. 

The Cultural Work of Sterotypes
5 credits

Monday/Wednesday 3:30 PM - 5:30 PM
B CORE 104L, VLPA 
Instructor: Jason Morse

This class will engage the way that theoretical, cultural, and social (such as identity) texts represent and challenge sterotypes. We will first take up two of the most recent theories of sterotyping - sterotype threat and implicit bias - to examine how these concepts are apparent in our daily lives. Then we will critically evaluate other theories if sterotyping and cultural texts of various genres and forms - including fiction, poetry, drama, graphic novels, film, television, visual art and internet media- to investigate the way culture negotiates, challenges, and reinforces sterotypical definitions. Work in this class will involve weekly short analysis postings, class contribution, presentations, 4 short papers that invite different forms of thinking about sterotypes (including a report, an ethnography,a creative project, and a concept analysis), and a reflective writing for the ePortfolio.

Words, Voice, Movement: Reimagining Performance
5 credits

Monday/Wednesday 1:15 PM - 3:15 PM
B CORE 104M, VLPA
Instructors: Deborah Hathaway

Words, Voice, Movement is a not just a class, it's a community. We'll play games, we'll create original work, and everyone will leave with communication skills that are translatable to any context. No previous performance experience necessary!

 

5-Credit Discovery Core I&S Options (some cross-listed as B CORE 110,  NW)

 

What to Eat!
5 credits

Monday/Wednesday 8:45 AM - 10:05 AM (33% Hybrid)
B CORE 107C, I&S 
Instructors: Adam Romero

In this class we investigate the production and consumption of knowledge about food, nutrition, and how and why we chose to eat what we do. We not only ask and analyze the question "what to eat?" from multiple perspectives (history, politics, nutrition, economics, anthropology, etc.), we also ask and analyze whether we can can eat our way to a better world and why people keep asking that question in the first place.

Welcome to College, Now Take This Quiz!: A Link Between Collge's Media (Mis)representations and Personality Assessments
5 credits

Monday/Wednesday/Friday 11:45 AM - 1:05 PM
B CORE 107D, I&S 
Instructors: Peter Brooks

Do you like Personality Tests like Myers-Briggs? Do you like movies about college? Join our class room community and discuss both through reflective writing and active activities!

Farm to Fork (Fa2Fo): Local 2 Global Perspectives
5 credits

Monday/Wednesday 1:15 PM - 3:15 PM
B CORE 107E, I&S 
Instructors: Mo West and Annie Bruck

The foods we grow, buy and consume have important personal and environmental consequences. Join us as we explore an array of food-related topics such as cultivation, culture, nutrition and sustainability, and implement a community-based service project!

Cancelled - The Half Marathon: What it takes to run 13.1 miles - Cancelled 
5 credits - 
Note: $85 Course Fee

Tuesday/Thursday 1:15 PM-3:15 PM
B CORE 107F, I&S 

Instructor: Kim O'Neill

This course will use the half marathon as a means to explore goal setting, human performance, exercise physiology, and the recreation running industry. Students will develop their own half marathon training program and will have the opportunity to apply what they learn by training for, and potentially completing, a half marathon. Progressive training for the 13.1 mile event will include walking, running, and core strengthening, as well as stretching, hydration, nutrition, and injury prevention. In addition, students will evaluate their own physiologic characteristic related to human performance, such as lactate threshold and VO2MAX, and explore psychological limitations to performance. The course will also explore the multi-billion dollar running industry, including touring of a major running shoe retailer and volunteering at a local road race.

Mythbusters!
5 credits

Tuesday/Thursday 3:30 PM - 5:30 PM
B CORE 107G, I&S 
Instructor: Charity Lovitt

What is the difference between myth and science? How are scientific practices different from scientific stereotypes? Deriving inspiration from the TV show Mythbusters! you will have to opportunity to investigate myths and create a video that can be shared with the public!

Philosophical Explorations of Science Fiction
5 credits

Tuesday/Thursday 3:30 PM - 5:30 PM
B CORE 107H, I&S
Instructor: David Nixon

This course will explore philosophical and ethical questions of humanity through analysis of science fiction film and text. We are interested in the thresholds between humans and machines, emotions and logic, bodies and minds, and disrupting the binary divisions that govern social relations among Earthlings. We will also consider how the narratives and technologies of science fiction already pervade our lives and shape our identity and everyday interactions. Throughout this course, we emphasize how science fiction exaggerates or magnifies real issues of social justice, and imagines futures where oppressions based on gender, race, class, sexuality, and ability are either intensified or resolved, often, though not always, through technological means. This course involves frequent creative writing exercises and students author an original science fiction short story as final project.

Zika and other Viral Epidemics
5 credits

Tuesday/Thursday 8:45 AM - 10:45 AM
B CORE 107I, I&S or B CORE 110B, NW - Select one only
Instructor: Susan McNabb

Late in 2015, news of a new epidemic caused by the Zika virus started to reach the consciousness of people in the US. Although it had been described decades earlier, something was causing Zika to spread more widely and swiftly than seen previously. Particularly devastating, in Brazil it caused life-threatening microcephaly in the children born to mothers who were infected while pregnant. What is the Zika virus? How is it related to other viruses, and do those relationships offer clues to its effects? How do viral diseases arise, how are they spread, and how do they become epidemics? How do we know? What can we do to stop them? We will investigate the nature of biological organisms vs. viruses, viruses as a major cause of infectious human disease, the origins of viruses that have jumped to humans, the involvement of insect vectors, how disease is tracked by the Centers for Disease Control and the World Health Organization, the development of vaccinations and treatments, and why Zika affects brain development in the fetuses of infected mothers.

Reducing Your Ecological Footprint on a Student Budget
5 credits

Tuesday/Thursday 8:45 AM - 10:45 AM
B CORE 107J, I&S
Instructor: Ursula Valdez

This course will evaluate some of the main factors involved in an individual's ecological footprint and on the feasible ways to reduce it. This course also aims to provide opportunities to analyze these issues critically, to assume an ethical responsibility and to adopt feasible solutions that can be accomplished by a college student. 

Students in this course will analyze from different perspectives (economical, environmental, ethical, social, etc) four topics related to the human ecological footprint: Overconsumption of single-use plastic, excessive food waste, food production and transportation systems. Students will be guided on how to critically assess information and analyze data for each of these issues and learn how they as students impact ecosystems and society.  

Students will be provided with research publications and data that allow them to develop skills for a critical assessment of the issues. They will also conduct an assessment on their own ecological footprint prior to taking the course and again towards the end of it. Based on their first self-assessment, students will be challenged to collect data on one aspect they want to change in their own lifestyle and to work on undertaking feasible actions towards that goal. This personal project will be done during the entire quarter and students will gather data on a number of measurable variables, as well as they will measure the impacts of this challenge on their personal budget and personal satisfaction. 

In addition, for each issue analyzed, as a class we will work on making simple DIY projects aimed at reducing ecological footprints at low cost. For example, we will make cloth bags, washable food wraps, utensil holders or implement other students' ideas on how to reduce single-use plastic.  We will work on a system to reduce personal food waste in collaboration with the Campus Sustainability Office, with whom we will develop hands-on activities. For addressing transportation we will create teams aiming to reduce the use of fossil fuels (i.e. carpooling, biking, walking or taking the bus). Students will learn how to produce their own food using the campus garden and the food forest, as well as designing their own mini-vegetable garden at home/apartment/dorm. These possible projects will be done with the support of scientific evidence measuring the use/impact during the quarter and also assessing the costs and feasibility for the long term.

Students will document their data and experiences in personal and class databases, and also they will write creative pieces about their findings aiming to educate the general public. 

Philosophical Explorations of Science Fiction
5 credits

Tuesday/Thursday 11:00 AM - 1:00 PM
B CORE 107K, I&S
Instructor: David Nixon

This course will explore philosophical and ethical questions of humanity through analysis of science fiction film and text. We are interested in the thresholds between humans and machines, emotions and logic, bodies and minds, and disrupting the binary divisions that govern social relations among Earthlings. We will also consider how the narratives and technologies of science fiction already pervade our lives and shape our identity and everyday interactions. Throughout this course, we emphasize how science fiction exaggerates or magnifies real issues of social justice, and imagines futures where oppressions based on gender, race, class, sexuality, and ability are either intensified or resolved, often, though not always, through technological means. This course involves frequent creative writing exercises and students author an original science fiction short story as final project.

5-Credit Discovery Core NW Options (some cross-listed as B CORE 104, VLPA or B CORE 107, I&S)

 

Understanding the Natural World at the Intersection of Art and Science
5 credits

Tuesday/Thursday 3:30 PM - 5:30 PM
B CORE 110A, NW or B CORE 104E, VLPA - Select one only
Instructor: Salwa Al-Noori and Gary Carpenter

This co-taught 5-credit Discovery Core I course introduces students to the intersection of art and science in developing a deeper understanding of the natural world. The sciences and the arts as valuable research tools have propelled discovery and informed each other throughout history. In anatomy and physiology, the intersection of these disciplines provides a more complete understanding of the close correlation of structure and function in biology. From Leonardo da Vinci's depiction of human anatomy and biological processes through observation and the arts, to Santiago Ramon y Cajalâ's pioneering drawings of brain cells in the field of neuroscience, our history is rich in examples that highlight the collaboration and intersection of science and art. Furthermore, the contribution of artistic perspectives to the understanding of biological science necessitates, in turn, an appreciation for the contribution of science as an inspiration for art.

This course examines the relationship of structure (morphology/anatomy) and function (physiology) through a variety of artistic mediums (drawing, painting, sculpting, graphics, etc.) improving observational skills and enhancing critical thinking.  Creativity and innovation help students address natural world explorations into "why our brains are structured the way they are," "why the inside of the kidney looks like it does," "what allows a plant to breathe" and "what the transport system in plants looks like" and many more such questions. Individual and group projects will culminate in an exhibition highlighting the symbiotic relationship between art and science.  This course brings together a scientist and an artist with a mutual appreciation of these disciplines as research methodologies and meets the FYPP Learning Goals of critical and creative inquiry and communication. 

Zika and other Viral Epidemics
5 credits

Tuesday/Thursday 8:45 AM - 10:45 AM
B CORE 110B, NW or B CORE 107I, I&S - Select one only
Instructor: Susan McNabb

Late in 2015, news of a new epidemic caused by the Zika virus started to reach the consciousness of people in the US. Although it had been described decades earlier, something was causing Zika to spread more widely and swiftly than seen previously. Particularly devastating, in Brazil it caused life-threatening microcephaly in the children born to mothers who were infected while pregnant. What is the Zika virus? How is it related to other viruses, and do those relationships offer clues to its effects? How do viral diseases arise, how are they spread, and how do they become epidemics? How do we know? What can we do to stop them? We will investigate the nature of biological organisms vs. viruses, viruses as a major cause of infectious human disease, the origins of viruses that have jumped to humans, the involvement of insect vectors, how disease is tracked by the Centers for Disease Control and the World Health Organization, the development of vaccinations and treatments, and why Zika affects brain development in the fetuses of infected mothers.

Nutritional Science
5 credits

Tuesday/Thursday 11:00 AM - 1:00 PM
B CORE 110C, NW
Instructor: Grace Lasker

This class is NOT about WHAT to eat but WHY to eat it. You will learn not only about how you ARE what you eat but also all the invisible dangers in our food supply and environment, yikes!

Area of Knowledge Key:

 

VLPA - Visual, Literary, and Performing Arts
I&S- Individual and Societies
NW- Natural World
W- Writing
C- Composition