First Year and Pre-Major Program (FYPP)

Autumn 2020 Discovery Core I

AUTUMN 2020 DISCOVERY CORE OPTIONS 

 

10-Credit Linked Classes (DC + Composition class)

 

The Politics and Practice of Yoga
10 credit linked courses

See the UWB Time Schedule for meeting days and times
B CORE 104A, VLPA and B WRIT 134I, Composition - Must select both
Instructor: Alice Pederson

According to market research, 28% of all US Americans have "practiced" yoga at one point or another. This is due, in no small part, to the many and varying reasons that it is prescribed and recommended from building strength and flexibility, to calming down and managing stress, to treating chronic pain and illness, yoga seems to be the modern cure-all. In this class, we will critically examine the roles, meanings, and values of yoga in contemporary US society. Through our analyses and experiences of contemporary yoga, we will mark the process of "discovering" ourselves as college students on this campus. Assignments will lead you to engage with campus resources such as the library, the Writing & Communication Center, and the Qualitative Skills Center, among others.

Our work in Interdisciplinary Writing will extend and add depth to our discussions on yoga.By taking these two courses together, we are able to develop a profounder and more nuanced understanding of the texts and issues that we discuss in B CORE 104. By using rhetorical analysis and setting texts "into conversation," we will deepen our engagement with the material and cultivate our own writerly voices in order to add to the conversation. 

 

Gender Under Construction
10 credit linked courses

See the UWB Time Schedule for meeting days and times
B CORE 107A, I&S, DIV  and B WRIT 134J, Composition - Must select both
Instructors: Lauren Lichty and Ashley Vasquez

From how we dress to how our society is organized, gender is a part of our daily lives. In this class we will explore how gender relates to power, culture, relationships, and our intersecting identities. Through dynamic conversation and a variety of video, audio, and written texts, we will investigate our personal connections, policies and regulations, and campus practices. This class is co-listed with BWRIT 134, which means we have time to slow down, reflect deeply, and develop content that matters to us.

 

5-Credit Discovery Core VLPA Options 

 

Our Reflection in the Black Mirror
5 credits

See the UWB Time Schedule for meeting days and times
B CORE 104B, VLPA
Instructor: Wanda Gregory

A never-ending video game. A tortured AI virtual assistant. A digital afterlife. A robotic boyfriend. DNA clones uploaded into a video game. Welcome to the world of the Netflix series Black Mirror, an often-sobering science fiction series that reflects the fears and perhaps not-so-distant realities of our time. While much of the technology highlighted in the show might be decades away, the ethical and moral questions raised have already begun impacting our way of thinking about social media, cloning, robots, privacy, surveillance, and consciousness. This course will look at some of the themes reflected in the television series allowing students the opportunity to explore the ethical and social impacts of some of the emerging technology reflected in the show. Students will be encouraged to discover and discuss their own thoughts on the ethical questions associated with the technologies and to research the feasibly of such technology and their impacts on society.

 

Dead Things & The Art of Fear
5 credits

See the UWB Time Schedule for meeting days and times
B CORE 104C, VLPA 
Instructor: Gavin Doyle

Through analysis of classic horror stories and films, this class allows students to investigate the reasons we are drawn to the unknown and the frightening. Selected readings and films will range in period from the Gothic, to the Victorian, and up to present day and will serve as the foundation for class work. 

In addition to historical investigations of the time period and circumstances in which the works were written, performed, or filmed, students will create new works and will perform adaptations of both new and classic works. Students will gain an understanding of how societal changes affect the sort of worries and fears expressed artistically by that period's artists.

The students' creation of new works will mirror the style and theme of classic works, but the subject will reflect present fears of the class allowing students to reflect on issues relevant to communities they are a part of. 

 

Arts and Politics of Walking
5 credits

See the UWB Time Schedule for meeting days and times
B CORE 104D, VLPA
Instructor: Jason Lambacher

Walking, like eating, breathing, and sleeping, is for many of us an unremarkable part of being alive, something we do without much thought or socio-cultural critique. But walking is a medium that can give us perspectives on society, nature, and ourselves. This class will examine the relation of walking to human evolution, health, cognition, contemplation, spirituality, place-based knowledge, environmental protection, urban design and wild trail networks, pedestrian rights, citizenship, public space, protest marches, social movements, and more. In addition to rigorous intellectual engagement with ideas about walking we will attend to a practice of walking consciously and deliberately, both in solitude and in groups, on and off the Bothell campus.

 

Words, Voice, Movement: Reimagining Performance
5 credits

See the UWB Time Schedule for meeting days and times
B CORE 104E and F, VLPA
Instructor: Deborah Hathaway

In Words, Voice, Movement we will work both individually and collectively to create original performances in a supportive and interactive classroom community, and in our greater Seattle area community. This introduction to performance and creative writing will allow you to find a deeper connection to your own words and the words of others, develop your artistic voice, and use movement and physicality to convey ideas. Through active participation in in-class writing, acting, and movement exercises, you will develop skills for devising performance projects and creating original compositions. Our learning experience will also include intergenerational arts workshops with Edmonds Center for the Arts and Silver Kite Community Arts. We hope to explore what it means to be a part of the community through intergenerational relationships and learn about the connection between the arts and memory loss. We will collectively focus on the theme of “new beginnings.” My hope is that you will leave this course with a greater capacity for self-expression and connection to others.

 

The Cultural Work of Stereotypes
5 credits

See the UWB Time Schedule for meeting days and times
B CORE 10G, VLPA, DIV 
Instructor: Jason Morse

Stereotypes frame every interaction we have with others, whether at school, work, or in our social lives. Along with starting the year-long project of your Discovery Core ePortfolio and engaging the campus resources available to you, this class will engage the way that theoretical, cultural, and social (such as identity) texts represent and challenge stereotypes. We will first take up three of the most recent theories of stereotyping – stereotype threat, implicit bias, and microaggressions – to examine how these concepts are apparent in our daily lives. Then we will critically examine other theories of stereotyping and interpret how cultural texts of various genres and forms – including fiction, poetry, drama, graphic novels, film, television, visual art, and internet media – negotiate, challenge, and/or reinforce stereotypical social categories.

 

Red Riding Hood on the Rapid Ride: Storytelling, Fairytales, Folktales and Fantastical Literature
5 credits

See the UWB Time Schedule for meeting days and times
B CORE 104H, VLPA 
Instructor: Louise Spiegler

This class delves into the fascinating oral traditions, literature and history of fantastical stories in their many guises. We’ll examine how stories filled with wonders, horrors, tricksters, heroes and supernatural beings have been told and transformed through the ages.

Once familiar with traditional story forms from a variety of cultures, we will look at how modern storytellers and artists have reinterpreted these stories for modern audiences and how meaning is transformed in the process.

Finally, we will connect these tales to our own stories —stories we create, stories we connect with, and stories we find in our own communities. We’ll use these stories as a way to reflect on our own challenges and life journeys. With a bi-weekly storytelling café as part of the course work, this interdisciplinary learning experience will also build community, confidence as new university students and critical thinking, research and presentation skills.

 

Atoms in Art & Culture
5 credits

See the UWB Time Schedule for meeting days and times
Maybe be taken as either B CORE 104I, VLPA or B CORE 110 E, NW
Instructor: Gavin Doyle

This course will introduce students to many fundamentals of chemistry as a basis to evaluate both the effects of chemistry on culture and art, and also the impact of diverse human perspectives on how chemistry is understood and communicated. This course asks the questions, “How do we describe the unseen?” and, “How do we visualize the invisible?” Students will explore how culture influences our understanding of matter; the impact of gender and ethnicity on how, what, and when scientific ideas are shared; and how our developing understanding of atoms has affected our art?

 

Courage, Creativity and Consequences
5 credits

See the UWB Time Schedule for meeting days and times
B CORE 104J, VLPA
Instructor: Gary Carpenter

In our technological world where information is so readily available and rapid change has become the norm, there is a pressing need across all disciplines and industries for people who think creatively and are comfortable working across disciplines. Through this course, we will examine the growing and urgent need for imagination, creativity, and innovation and will explore and develop personal approaches to creativity through interdisciplinary inquiry. Contemplation, constructive play, readings and active discussions will launch written and visual arts projects designed to broaden creative resourcefulness and challenge our own limitations.

 

Our Home in the Forest: Ecology, Literature, and Culture
5 credits

See the UWB Time Schedule for meeting days and times
May be taken as B CORE 104K, VLPA or BCORE 110C, NW
Instructors: Jennifer Atkinson and Warren Gold

Want to get out of the classroom and explore forests near our campus? This class introduces student to forest ecology as well as the forested realms of literature, film, mythology, and Native American storytelling. We take multiple field trips to study forest ecology in our region; meet with local activists; and read about forests in Classical mythology, fairy tales, children's literature, and science fiction. Students also analyze films like "Avatar" and video games featuring Thoreau's classic work Walden. Prepare to have fun and explore the outdoors!

 

Welcome to College, Now Take This Quiz!: A Link Between College's Media (Mis)representations and Personality Assessments
5 credits

See the UWB Time Schedule for meeting days and times
B CORE 107L, VLPA 
Instructor: Peter Brooks

Do you like Personality Tests like Myers-Briggs? Do you like movies about college? Join our classroom community and discuss both through reflective writing and active activities!

 

Seeing is Believing
5 credits

See the UWB Time Schedule for meeting days and times
B CORE 104M, VLPA
Instructor: Howard Hsu

Seeing is Believing, introduces students to both the science of light and the photographic recording of light for personal expression. During the course, students will be introduced to the following topics and concepts: photography as a means of communication and an art form, the physical properties of light and its effect in the natural world, philosophical and early theories on light, and historical and contemporary photographers.

The course will include in-class labs, demonstrations of physical properties of light and photographic principles, a class presentation exploring a scientific phenomenon of light, and culminate with a personal photographic essay/series for the final project.

 

5-Credit Discovery Core I&S Options 

 

This is What Democracy Looks Like?
5 credits

See the UWB Time Schedule for meeting days and times
B CORE 107B, I&S
Instructor: Ian Porter

Let’s step back from the fray of the 2020 presidential election and explore what democracy really is and what we can and should do as citizens in a democracy. In this course, we explore democracy and democratic citizenship by examining their representations in media. We will watch films (both fiction and documentary) and read graphic novels, popular press articles, and scholarship on democracy. Throughout our guiding question will be “What does democracy really look like, and how can I make it a reality?” In addition to the theme of democracy, students will learn crucial academic skills, including critical reading strategies, analytical writing strategies, and oral presentation strategies. You will have an opportunity to research something of interest to you regarding democracy and communicate it to the class. And, you will have an opportunity to be creative in your final project, which will ask you to represent democracy by creating an artifact or performing an action. Along the way, we will learn about important student resources on campus that can guide you toward success in achieving your academic, professional, and personal goals.

 

Time Traveling through Experiential Learning that Spans the Natural World, Art and Civics
5 credits

See the UWB Time Schedule for meeting days and times
May be taken as B CORE 107C, I&S or B CORE 110A, NW
Instructors: Kris Gustafson and Amy Lambert

This course explores stories told about the world around us. Students become time travelers in this course through experiential learning that spans the natural world, art, and civics. Just like Instagram or Tik Tok organizes and archives our visual and performance experiences, students in this class will enter the basements of institutions that curate everything from dead bumblebees to dusty newspapers. Institutional record keepers we visit include the Henry Art Museum, Burke Museum of Natural and Cultural History, and UW Suzzallo Library. We ask: What records do we keep (and who is “we”)? How do we explain absences in archives and marginalization through archives? What happens to the records of a bumblebee, a newspaper, or the student’s social media of choice? As our class explores together, we center student knowledge through their real and imagined archives. Through course readings and video, as well as the off-campus visits, students see how people across the arts, humanities, social sciences, and sciences creatively describe gaps in archives. This team-taught Discovery Core course is perfect for students who learn best through innovative, in-depth, and engaged learning moments in and out of the classroom.

 

 

The Only Thing We Have to Fear is Fear Itself
5 credits

See the UWB Time Schedule for meeting days and times
B CORE 107D, I&S
Instructor: Marc Dupuis

As technology has evolved, so has the context in which information is conveyed to the masses. This has presented new opportunities and challenges, especially as it relates to democratic forms of government. Information warfare, as some have called it, presents a clear and present danger to the most critical infrastructure of all in a democratic society—the right and ability of its people to choose their leaders. Disinformation works in large part because it leverages perhaps the most powerful emotion we have as humans, fear, in a personally relevant and powerful way.


In this course, we will examine the system of government in the United States, including its founding, structure, and both historical and modern challenges. Next, we will explore how this system has come under attack through information warfare. These disinformation campaigns must be combated in a number of ways, including through policy, education, and cybersecurity. The role of cybersecurity will be explored in detail, including both its strengths and limitations. This will include an emphasis on the integrity of information—a core tenet of cybersecurity and the factor most at play with these disinformation campaigns. Additionally, we will take a look at how you can most effectively protect yourself from cybersecurity and privacy threats.

Finally, we will examine why disinformation campaigns and other attacks on nation states and us personally, work. This will involve a dive into the psychology of decision making, risk perception, and why we do the things we do.

 

Place and Displacement in the Americas: Human Rights, Culture, and Ethnicity
5 credits

See the UWB Time Schedule for meeting days and times
B CORE 107E, I&S, DIV
Instructor: Julie Shayne

How do people shape the places in which they live and, in the case of immigrants, reshape their new homes? How do things like race, gender, social class, and national heritage affect peoples’ experiences and places? In this class we'll explore these questions and more through a focus on South, Central, and North American communities. We'll focus on the way collectives and individuals are shaped through everything from hip-hop, to street murals, to mass incarceration, to Native American reservations, to undocumented immigrant status, to homelessness, to transgender identity.

 

Energy and the Future
5 credits

See the UWB Time Schedule for meeting days and times
B CORE 107F, I&S 
Instructor: Matthew Gliboff

Survey of scientific, technological and potential of large-scale renewable energy and barriers to its implementation. Includes discussion of solar, wind, nuclear and other possible energy sources; energy efficiency, large-scale energy storage, climate change; and numerous domestic and international case studies of efforts in sustainability.

Students will engage with the quantitative skills center through quantitative reasoning problems based around basic physics concepts in energy, as well as data related to applications of energy technologies. Students will reflect on their interactions with evidence-based and quantitative arguments for socially relevant issues, including climate change. Informal oral and written presentations will be based on student-led research and evidence gathering in renewable energy technologies. Students will be working in groups consistently during in-class and online activities.

In class interactions will include quantitative problem solving related to energy concepts including efficiency, power and thermodynamics.  Other class periods will be discussion based, with students expected to bring evidence to support their ideas into the discussion through pre-lecture online activities.
 

Viral Epidemics (2020)
5 credits

See the UWB Time Schedule for meeting days and times
May be taken as B CORE 107G, I&S or B CORE 110D, NW 
Instructor: Susan McNabb

The current COVID-19 pandemic demonstrates the deadly force of a virus (SARS-CoV-2) and is causing substantial long-term social and economic disruption. Although not as fatal as Ebola, it spreads much more rapidly—in part by people with few or no symptoms of the disease. In 2019 the measles, formerly rare due to vaccination, staged a global comeback, and Ebola flared up in the Democratic Republic of the Congo. In 2015, there was a Zika epidemic in Brazil that resulted in thousands of babies with microcephaly, a congenital brain defect that can be lethal or dramatically reduce quality of life. Zika and Ebola diseases are caused by viruses that have been around for at least decades. SARS-CoV-2 was only recently identified, although related viruses have been known for many years--some cause the common cold. Why and how do viruses cause local outbreaks, epidemics or even global pandemics?

Most of the world’s pandemics are caused by viruses. How can viruses, which are not strictly speaking alive, have such great power? How do our immune systems fight them; how do vaccines help? What do we know about viruses, how they change over time, and the implications for human health? As Earth’s climate changes, how will this affect their spread? How are we responding to these viral challenges? What are the roles of governmental agencies such as the CDC and WHO, and non-governmental agencies such as the Gates Foundation? We will examine all of these questions using SARS-CoV-2, the Zika virus, and other viruses as case studies, with an emphasis on how we know.

 

What to Eat!
5 credits

See the UWB Time Schedule for meeting days and times
B CORE 107H, I&S 
Instructor: Adam Romero

In this class we investigate the production and consumption of knowledge about food, nutrition, and how and why we chose to eat what we do. We not only ask and analyze the question "what to eat?" from multiple perspectives (history, politics, nutrition, economics, anthropology, etc.), we also ask and analyze whether we can eat our way to a better world and why people keep asking that question in the first place.

 

Playbook for Life
5 credits

See the UWB Time Schedule for meeting days and times
B CORE 107I, I&S 
Instructor: Kristiina Hiukka

You’re now a college student. You’ve stepped into adulthood where expectations are mounting. It can feel overwhelming when you’re now confronted with more choices than ever before – and every decision you make will impact the rest of your life.

Fear no more! We’ve designed a course that helps you tackle the challenges of designing your life during your time as a student at UWB – and you career thereafter. This class offers a framework, tools, and a community of peers and mentors where we’ll work on life planning through assigned readings, reflections, and in-class exercises. The course is highly collaborative and includes seminar-style discussions, personal written reflections, guest speakers, and individual mentoring/coaching. We apply principles from Design Thinking (Stanford Design School), Growth Mindset (Carol S. Dweck), neuroscience and professional life and leadership coaching methodologies.

This course is an immersive experience, not a lecture series. We welcome students who want to engage with ideas, their peers and mentors in an honest effort in thinking about their lives – and supporting others on the same journey.

 

Philosophical Explorations of Science Fiction
5 credits

See the UWB Time Schedule for meeting days and times
B CORE 107K, I&S
Instructor: David Nixon

While science fiction may seem to be about other times and places, most of it is really about us. In this class we’ll read sci-fi stories and watch sci-fi movies as a way to examine our own time and place. In the process, we’ll explore various philosophical concepts like free will, gender binaries, artificial intelligence, knowledge, justice, and the meaning of life. The instructor has a Ph.D. in Philosophy and a background in the performing arts, so students can expect to be part of engaging and entertaining group discussions about the Big Ideas that we’ll see in the sci-fi movies we’ll watch together and the sci-fi stories we’ll read. This course involves frequent creative writing exercises and students will author their own original science fiction short story as a final project. As a Discovery Core course, this class will also introduce students to some important parts of UWB life, like research in the library, use of various campus resources, interdisciplinary inquiry, and others. The class is meant to be a fun and intellectually stimulating class that’s also a great introduction to your new life at UWB.

The Economy of Washington State
5 credits

See the UWB Time Schedule for meeting days and times
B CORE 107K, I&S
Instructor: Codrin Nedita

Understanding the local economy and how it compares to other states is a crucial part of community and economic development. Voters make choices that affect our economy, from trade to economic inequality. Making informed decisions can help our economy and affect our well-being. This course will discuss the economy of Washington State. We will start with a brief discussion of the economic development and history of the Washington State economy. We will then cover more current topics that include, but are not limited to: international trade, state budget, economic development, main industries, GDP and employment. We will conclude with a discussion about key issues affecting the Washington State economy: inequality, urban sprawl, housing, transportation, education and climate change.

 

 5-Credit Discovery Core NW Options

 

Time Traveling through Experiential Learning that Spans the Natural World, Art and Civics
5 credits

See the UWB Time Schedule for meeting days and times
May be taken as B CORE 110A, NW or B CORE 107C, I&S
Instructors: Kris Gustafson and Amy Lambert

This course explores stories told about the world around us. Students become time travelers in this course through experiential learning that spans the natural world, art, and civics. Just like Instagram or Tik Tok organizes and archives our visual and performance experiences, students in this class will enter the basements of institutions that curate everything from dead bumblebees to dusty newspapers. Institutional record keepers we visit include the Henry Art Museum, Burke Museum of Natural and Cultural History, and UW Suzzallo Library. We ask: What records do we keep (and who is “we”)? How do we explain absences in archives and marginalization through archives? What happens to the records of a bumblebee, a newspaper, or the student’s social media of choice? As our class explores together, we center student knowledge through their real and imagined archives. Through course readings and video, as well as the off-campus visits, students see how people across the arts, humanities, social sciences, and sciences creatively describe gaps in archives. This team-taught Discovery Core course is perfect for students who learn best through innovative, in-depth, and engaged learning moments in and out of the classroom.

 

Nutritional Science
5 credits

See the UWB Time Schedule for meeting days and times
B CORE 110B, NW
Instructor: Grace Lasker

This course introduces key concepts of nutrition while emphasizing the importance of interpreting research, studies, and marketing claims in order to make healthy and safe decisions around diet and exercise. Also introduces elements of population health and social justice around food availability, agriculture and environmental practices, chronic disease, and personal health. Students will assess their own diet and think critically about what makes a food healthy.

 

Our Home in the Forest: Ecology, Literature, and Culture
5 credits

See the UWB Time Schedule for meeting days and times
May be taken as BCORE 110C, NW or B CORE 104K, VLPA
Instructors: Jennifer Atkinson and Warren Gold

Want to get out of the classroom and explore forests near our campus? This class introduces student to forest ecology as well as the forested realms of literature, film, mythology, and Native American storytelling. We take multiple field trips to study forest ecology in our region; meet with local activists; and read about forests in Classical mythology, fairy tales, children's literature, and science fiction. Students also analyze films like "Avatar" and video games featuring Thoreau's classic work Walden. Prepare to have fun and explore the outdoors!

 

Viral Epidemics (2020)
5 credits

See the UWB Time Schedule for meeting days and times
May be taken as B CORE 107G, I&S or B CORE 110D, NW 
Instructor: Susan McNabb

The current COVID-19 pandemic demonstrates the deadly force of a virus (SARS-CoV-2) and is causing substantial long-term social and economic disruption. Although not as fatal as Ebola, it spreads much more rapidly—in part by people with few or no symptoms of the disease. In 2019 the measles, formerly rare due to vaccination, staged a global comeback, and Ebola flared up in the Democratic Republic of the Congo. In 2015, there was a Zika epidemic in Brazil that resulted in thousands of babies with microcephaly, a congenital brain defect that can be lethal or dramatically reduce quality of life. Zika and Ebola diseases are caused by viruses that have been around for at least decades. SARS-CoV-2 was only recently identified, although related viruses have been known for many years--some cause the common cold. Why and how do viruses cause local outbreaks, epidemics or even global pandemics?

Most of the world’s pandemics are caused by viruses. How can viruses, which are not strictly speaking alive, have such great power? How do our immune systems fight them; how do vaccines help? What do we know about viruses, how they change over time, and the implications for human health? As Earth’s climate changes, how will this affect their spread? How are we responding to these viral challenges? What are the roles of governmental agencies such as the CDC and WHO, and non-governmental agencies such as the Gates Foundation? We will examine all of these questions using SARS-CoV-2, the Zika virus, and other viruses as case studies, with an emphasis on how we know.

Atoms in Art & Culture
5 credits

See the UWB Time Schedule for meeting days and times
Maybe be taken as either B CORE 104I, VLPA or B CORE 110 E, NW
Instructor: Gavin Doyle

This course will introduce students to many fundamentals of chemistry as a basis to evaluate both the effects of chemistry on culture and art, and also the impact of diverse human perspectives on how chemistry is understood and communicated. This course asks the questions, “How do we describe the unseen?” and, “How do we visualize the invisible?” Students will explore how culture influences our understanding of matter; the impact of gender and ethnicity on how, what, and when scientific ideas are shared; and how our developing understanding of atoms has affected our art?

 

5-Credit Discovery Core for Students in the Academic Transition Program

 

Toward Building Meaning & Purpose: Our Bodies Navigating Higher Education
5 credits

See the UWB Time Schedule for meeting days and times
 B CORE 107J, I&S 
Instructors: Natasha Merchant

Through individual and communal reflection, we spend this quarter contemplating how our bodies make meaning (and are assigned meaning) within the higher educational context. Together, we use the words and works of scholars, artists, and community-workers to make sense of how knowledge, higher education, and our bodies fit together and speak to larger goals of resistance and liberation.

Area of Knowledge Key:

 

VLPA - Visual, Literary, and Performing Arts
I&S- Individual and Societies
NW- Natural World
W- Writing
C- Composition