Master of Science in Electrical Engineering

Alumni Stories

INTERVIEWS

MSEE-Griggs-Devon-web.jpgMEET DEVON GRIGGS,  a graduate from the Master of Science in Electrical Engineering ('18). As a full-time Boeing employee and someone who wanted to continue their electrical engineering education, Devon found the program to be designed for working professionals and convenient for his commute. Now a full-time electrical engineering PhD student in the Department of Electrical & Computer Engineering at the University of Washington, Devon mentions that it is “unlikely that I would have been admitted if I did not have the opportunity to earn a strong MSEE degree through UW Bothell”. We invite you to read Devon’s Q&A interview.

 

Malia StewardMEET MALIA STEWARD, a graduate from the Master of Science in Electrical Engineering ('18). Reflecting on her path at UW Bothell first as an undergraduate and then a master’s degree student, Malia credits the quality of courses, opportunities to participate in research and working closely with faculty for her success. In her final year of the program, Malia was awarded the National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship that made her Ph.D. dreams a reality. She is now a doctoral student in mechanical engineering at the University of Washington. We invite you to read Malia’s Q&A interview.

 

Tarannum FerdousMEET TARANNUM FERDOUS, a graduate from the Master of Science in Electrical Engineering ('16). We had the opportunity to ask Tarannum why she chose the master’s in electrical engineering and what she thought about her experiences as a student in the program. Now an Associate Engineering at T-Mobile, Tarannum reflects on how the faculty, academic advisors and STEM graduate career counselor were the highlight of the student experience. We invite you to read Tarannum’s Q&A interview.

In the News

Challenge accepted - A passion for research and desire to continually learn drive UW Ph.D. candidate

Malia Steward03/01/2020 - UW Bothell bachelor's and master's in electrical engineering Alumna Malia Steward was awarded the opportunity of a life time to continue her doctoral studies when she was gradnted a Graduate Research Fellowship from the National Science Foundation. Malia's career goal is to become a university professor, so she went on to pursue a Ph.D. in Mechanical engineering at UW. Read in the Diversity in Action magazine about Malia's studies and her view on the importance of supporting women of color in the STEM industry.

 

Damaging dust kept at bay in clean room

Malia Steward wearing protective suit and mask12/13/2018 - A clean room is rare in most universities the size of UW Bothell, but it was important to faculty to provide this research space to students since it provides the perfect environment to conduct experiments. Behind a clean room mask is Malia Steward, a summer 2018 graduate with a Master of Science in Electrical Engineering, who has since begun a UW doctorate program in mechanical engineering under a National Science Foundation fellowship. Read about research in the Clean Room with Malia.

MSEE student receives national science fellowship

Seungkeun Choi and Malia Steward05/24/2018 - The National Science Foundation (NSF) selected 2,000 awardees out of 12,000 applicants for the competitive Graduate Research Fellowship Award (GRFP) to pursue a doctorate. Master's in electrical engineering student Malia Steward is one of them, and believed by advisors to be the first recipient at UW Bothell. Read about Malia's experience and NSF GRFP award.
 

UW Bothell students share in physics discovery

Joey Key, Jomardee Perkins and Paul Marsh10/13/2017 - Paul Marsh is one of two UW Bothell students who shared the xcitement of making major astronomical discoveries this summer using the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO), which recently won a Nobel Prize for its three founders. Paul Marsh is a second-year graduate student in electrical engineering and plans to go on to get a doctorate in bioengineering. Read the full UW Bothell story on the students discovery.

UW Bothell grows reputation in medical device technology

Daniel Schossow, Hung Coao and Manuja Sharma07/06/2017 - Heart pacemakers, used by millions of people who suffer heart problems, need to have their battery replaced surgically every six or seven years. UW Bothell students researched the possibility of wireless power transfer so the battery can be recharged without surgery. Daniel Schossow, master's in electircal engineering student, is one of two students who won awards for this research. Daniel won the Wireless Power Transfer for Biomedical Applications Award. Read the the full article on medical device technology.