Division of Engineering & Mathematics

Faculty

Engineering & Mathematics Full-time Faculty


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Shima Abadi, Ph.D.

Assistant Professor
Mechanical Engineering

Office: Disc 452L
Email: abadi@uw.edu

Website

Dr. Abadi obtained her Ph.D. in Mechanical Engineering in 2013, and a dual M.S. in Applied Mathematics and Mechanical Engineering in 2010 from the University of Michigan. Prior to joining UW Bothell, she held a dual appointment as a postdoctoral research scientist at Columbia University and a visiting scientist at the University of Washington, School of Oceanography from 2013 to 2015.

Her research primarily focuses on acoustical oceanography as it relates to wave propagation and energy interaction with the ocean bottom. Her interests range from underwater acoustics and array signal processing algorithms to assessing the impact of seismic activities on the marine ecosystem, suppressing the cavitation effect on submersible devices, and improving the resolution of acoustic images.  


Andrew Abian

Andrew Abian, M.S.

Lecturer

Mathematics

Office: HH 1319
Email: aabian@uw.edu


Harry Aintablian

Hrair Aintablian, Ph.D.

Sr. Lecturer

Electrical Engineering

Office: UWBB 224
Email: haintab@uw.edu

Dr. Aintablian received his Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering from Ohio University of Athens, OH, in 1994. Prior to coming to UW Bothell, he was a power engineer at Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, CA, supporting the Europa Clipper, the SMAP observer and the Mars Science Laboratory (Curiosity) projects.  His job functions included the design, development and testing of spacecraft power systems/power electronics.  He has also worked at Boeing in Canoga Park, CA as a power engineer for the International Space Station. 

His teaching is focused on both theory and practice.   While theory is fundamental to engineering education, it is not sufficient.  He is a proponent of teaching students the practical aspects of engineering in order to better motivate and prepare them for industry.

His research emphasis is on power electronics and its applications to alternative energy and space power systems.   It is highly important to optimize power and energy in emerging energy systems such as photovoltaics, ocean and energy storage technologies.  Dr. Aintablian is also interested in investigating the challenges facing the health of the power grid due to the proliferation of distributed systems.   


Alex Barchechat

Alexandre Barchechat, Ph.D.

Lecturer

Mathematics

Office: HH 1319
Email: bacheca@uw.edu


Arnie Berger

Arnold S. Berger, Ph.D.

Division Chair and Associate Professor; Degree Coordinator, Electrical Engineering

Office: UWBB 255
Email: aberger@uw.edu
Website

Dr. Berger has a Ph.D. in Material Science from Cornell University and has 20+ years of industrial experience ranging from hardware design engineer to Director of Research and Development (R&D) at several companies including Ford Motor Company, Hewlett-Packard, Advanced Micro Devices and Applied Microsystems. Moreover, Dr. Berger has more than 15 years of teaching experience at UWB and other institutions. He has served in many committees at the program and university level, and chaired the faculty committee that created the BSEE degree at UWB. Dr. Berger has published over 55 papers, holds four patents and authored two textbooks on computer architecture and embedded design. He is a senior member of IEEE and was the first faculty advisor to the IEEE student chapter.


Dr. Berger’s expertise is in digital design and embedded system design. His research interests are on methods of debugging and validating performance of real-time computer systems, and the specialized tools required to do this. He is also looking at methods of detecting plagiarism in student work and also novel ways to utilize technology to teach electrical engineering, in particular, remotely accessible undergraduate engineering laboratory classes. 


John Bridge

John Bridge, Ph.D.

Associate Professor
Mechanical Engineering

Office: DISC-452K
Email: jwbridge@uw.edu

Dr. John Bridge received his Ph.D. in Materials Science and Engineering Interdisciplinary at the University of Maine, preceded by a Master's in Materials Engineering at the University of Dayton and a Bachelor's in Engineering Mechanics at the United States Air Force Academy.

Dr. Bridge's research focuses on synthetic granular composites used on sports surfaces, mechanisms of polymer adhesion, polymer environmental degradation, fatigue and fracture, advanced materials characterization. 


Hung Cao

Hung Cao, Ph.D.

Assistant Professor

Electrical Engineering

Office: UWBB 107K
Email: hungcao@uw.edu

Website

Hung Cao received his B.Sc. degree in Electronics and Telecommunications from Hanoi University of Technology, Vietnam and later obtained his M.Sc. and Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering from the University of Texas at Arlington. He served as a lecturer at Vietnam Maritime University from 2003 to 2005. Prior to coming to UW Bothell in 2015, Dr. Cao worked as a research associate at Biomedical Engineering Department, University of Southern California (2012-2013); a scientist at Veterans Affairs Hospital and David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles (2013-2014) and as research faculty member at École de technologie supérieure (ETS), Montreal, QC, Canada (2014-2015). He has been also an affiliate faculty at the School of System Biology, George Mason University and served in the advisory board for Zansors, LLC, a start-up bio-tech company located in Washington DC area.


Dr. Cao has been conducting research in applying engineering tools for a wide range of biomedical applications with scientists in multidisciplinary fields in UT Arlington, UT Dallas, UT Austin, USC, UCLA, UC San Diego, Caltech and ETS Montreal. His research interests include MEMS, BioMEMS, micro- and nano-fabrication, sensors and wireless systems for healthcare devices and biological research, particularly in neural and cardiovascular engineering. Dr. Cao has a strong publication record in the related fields with 40+ peer-reviewed articles.


Seungkeun Choi

Seungkeun Choi, Ph.D.

Assistant Professor

Electrical Engineering

Office: UWBB 228
Email: schoi5@uw.edu
Website

Dr. Choi received his Ph.D. in Electrical and Computer Engineering from the Georgia Institute of Technology in 2007. He also served as an adjunct professor at Southern Polytechnic State University. Dr. Choi has authored or co-authored 12 papers and has given talks at 19 peer-reviewed conferences.

His area of interest centers on renewable energy with a focus on photovoltaics and energy efficient electronics, building on his expertise in organic and inorganic semiconductors, and MEMS.
 


Steven Collins

Steven Collins, Ph.D.

Associate Professor
Mechanical Engineering

Office: DISC-452M
Email: swcollin@u.washington.edu
Website

Prof. Collins has taught at UW Bothell since 1993.  For most of that period, he was part of the faculty of Interdisciplinary Arts and Sciences.  He joined the School of STEM at the time of its formation as the Science and Technology Program in 2010 and is a founding faculty member of the Engineering and Mathematics Division. 

His interests range from thermodynamics and power generation to ethics and public policy.  As both an engineer and social scientist, he seeks in his scholarship to deepen the connections between engineering and liberal arts, in part by integrating ethics, history, and public policy into the required curriculum.  Current research projects include application of Japanese philosophy to contemporary problems in engineering ethics, and the role of ideas and institutions in shaping trajectories of technological change in energy and power systems.  He has been an affiliated researcher at Japan’s National Institute of Science and Technology Policy, and has had research funded by the NSF and Japan Society for the Promotion of Science.  Prior to coming to UW Bothell, he was employed as a process and control systems engineer at Philip Morris (now Altria) and Eastman Kodak.  He is a licensed Professional Engineer (PE) in Washington State.


Tadesse Ghirmai

Tadesse Ghirmai, Ph.D.

Assistant Professor

Electrical Engineering

Office: UWBB 221
Email: tadg@uw.edu
Website

He has a Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering from the State University of New York at Stony Brook University. Dr Ghirmai has two year of industrial experience working as a systems engineer with NextWave Wireless Inc, San Diego. Dr. Ghirmai is a member of IEEE.

His expertise is in communication and signal processing. Dr. Ghirmai has 13 years of teaching experience at several institutions. He has published over 20 papers in peer-reviewed journals and conference proceedings. 


Mahmoud Ghofrani

Mahmoud Ghofrani, Ph.D.

Assistant Professor

Electrical Engineering

Office: UWBB 227
Email: mrani@uw.edu
Website

Dr. Ghofrani received his B.Sc. degree in Electrical Engineering from Amir-Kabir University of Technology, Tehran, Iran in 2005, the M.Sc. degree from University of Tehran, Tehran, Iran, in 2008, and the Ph.D. degree from University of Nevada, Reno, in 2014. Since September 2013, he has been with the School of Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics at University of Washington, Bothell, where he is currently an Assistant Professor.

His research interests include power systems operation and planning, renewable energy systems, smart grids, electric vehicles and electricity market.
 


Nicole Hamilton

Nicole Hamilton, M.S.

Lecturer

Electrical Engineering

Office: Husky Hall 1436
Email: kd1uj@uw.edu
Website

 She received her BSEE and MSEE from Stanford University and her MBA with high honors from Boston University. Ms Hamilton is the president and founder of Hamilton Laboratories in Redmond, Washington and is the author of Hamilton C shell, a software tools package for developers on Windows. She has wide industrial experience having worked at Microsoft, Real Networks, Prime Computer and IBM. She is a registered professional engineer and a Life Senior Member of the IEEE.


Nicole Hoover

Nicole Hoover

Lecturer

Mathematics

Office: HH - 1432
Email: nhoover@uw.edu

Nicole Hoover received her B.S. in Mathematics from San Jose State University and later earned her M.A. in Mathematics from the University of California Davis. She served in several instructional capacities at UC Davis, Cosumnes River College, and the University of New Orleans before joining UW Bothell in 2006. She became the director of the Quantitative Skills Center from 2006 to 2009. Returning to UW Bothell in 2012 as a part-time instructor, she was appointed as a full-time instructor in 2015; in those roles, she has taught a wide variety of courses ranging from pre-calculus to junior level matrix algebra.


Thomas Humphries

Thomas Humphries, Ph.D.

Assistant Professor

Mathematics

Office: HH - 1436
Email:thumphri@uw.edu

Dr. Humphries received his Ph.D. in Applied and Computational Mathematics from Simon Fraser University in British Columbia, Canada. Prior to that he completed a BMath (Joint Applied Math and Computer Science) at the University of Waterloo, Ontario. He began work as an Assistant Professor at UW Bothell in Fall 2015, following postdoctoral appointments in the math departments at Oregon State University and Memorial University of Newfoundland.

Dr. Humphries primary research interest is tomographic image reconstruction, particularly iterative methods for CT and SPECT imaging. He has worked on developing techniques for reconstruction of dynamic images in SPECT, and reconstruction from polyenergetic and sparse-view data in CT. While at Memorial University he also worked on derivative-free optimization techniques applied industrial problems, which continues to be a topic of interest to him.


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Lawrence Lam, Ph.D.

Senior Lecturer

Electrical Engineering

Office: UWBB 252
Email: llam@uw.edu

Dr. Lam graduated from UT Austin, UW Seattle with BSEE, MSEE and PhD. He had further training in biomedical engineering from UW Seattle and postdoc research in material science from Cornell University. He was a R&D member of the National Semiconductor Corp working in process
integration to develop world's first BiCMOS SRAM for Cray Supercomputer. He also worked in the Nobel Prize nominee Dr. Ching Tang's team to develop OLED display. He holds 2 US patents and is a senior IEEE member. Dr. Lam has more than twelve years of teaching experience and was the chair of an ABET accredited Biomedical Engineering Technology program.

His expertise is in device integration, MEMS, sensors and optoelectronics. His current research interest is in human machine interface, biomedical sensors, MEMS and remote labs.


MLoreto photoMilagros Loreto, Ph.D.

Assistant Professor

Mathematics

Office: DISC - 352N

Email: mloreto@uw.edu

Dr. Loreto holds a PhD in Computer Science, MS. in Mathematics and a BS in Applied Mathematics. Her research interest is mainly applied mathematics focused on numerical optimization, non-linear optimization, non-smooth and smooth optimization. She has also worked on interesting applications in biology, in particular during her research as post-doctoral fellow at Duke University.

Since 2014, Dr. Loreto works as Tenure-Track Assistant Professor at UWB.  She teaches courses from basic math to optimization electives. Additionally, she mentors undergraduate students in optimization research projects.

Before joining UWB she worked as Tenure-Track Assistant Professor of Mathematics at the Florida Memorial University (FMU). Where she received awards such as: Scholar of the Year 2012, and Teacher of the Year 2013 for the Division of Computer Science and Mathematics. Dr. Loreto teaching and research experience started at the Universidad Central de Venezuela, where she held a position of Aggregate Exclusive Dedication Professor before deciding to move to United States of America. 


Casey Mann

Casey Mann, Ph.D.

Associate Professor

Mathematics

Office: DISC-352E
Email:cemann@uw.edu

Website

Dr. Mann received his Ph.D. in mathematics from the University of Arkansas in 2001. Prior to joining the faculty at UW Bothell, Dr. Mann was a faculty member at the University of Texas at Tyler for 11 years.

Dr. Mann’s areas of research include discrete and computational geometry. In particular, he is interested in tilings of 2-D and 3-D Euclidean space, tilings in non-Euclidean spaces, and applications of tilings to self-assembly. He is also interested in discrete lattice knots. As a cofounder of the UW Bothell Mathematics REU site, Dr. Mann is active in engaging undergraduate students in research.


Jennifer McLoud-Mann

Jennifer McLoud-Mann, Ph.D.

Associate Professor

Mathematics

Office: DISC-352K
Email: JMcLoud@uw.edu

Website

Dr. McLoud received her Ph.D. in Mathematics from the University of Arkansas in 2002 and her B.S. in Mathematics from East Central University in Ada, Oklahoma in 1997. She joined the UW Bothell faculty in 2013 as a tenured associate professor. Prior to joining UW Bothell, she worked at the University of Texas at Tyler. While at UT Tyler, she not only gained experience as a tenure-track faculty, but she served as the Associate Dean of the College of Arts & Sciences.

Dr. McLoud’s current research interests include various areas in discrete mathematics including knot theory, tiling theory, and combinatorics. More accessible areas of mathematics allow her to involve undergraduate students in her research. Dr. McLoud is the principal investigator on a National Science Foundation (NSF) Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REU) grant establishing the first NSF REU site at UW Bothell. In summer 2015, a tiling theory research result involving an undergraduate and now UW alum, David Von Derau, and colleague, Casey Mann, caught much media attention as well as attention from the mathematics community; after 30 years since the last major result, they discovered the 15th pentagon to tile the plane.


Pierre Mourad

Pierre Mourad, Ph.D.

Associate Professor
Mechanical Engineering

Office: UWB Disc 462L
Email: doumitt@uw.edu

Website

Dr. Pierre Mourad received his Ph.D. and Master's in Applied Mathematics from the University of Washington, Seattle, preceded by his Bachelor's in Mathematics from Rutger's University. He holds Associate Professorship at the University of Washington, affiliated with a variety of departments whose interests are defined by brain disorders, including Neurosurgery, Radiology, Engineering and Mathematics, Bioengineering, and Applied Physics Laboratory.

Dr. Mourad focuses on collaborations with medical doctors on clinically relevant problems, bringing scientists and engineers with an interest in addressing those problems. His research interests include: ultrasound-based medical device invention, and development and commercialization, including use of 3D printing. Dr. Mourad specializes in bringing physics - diagnostic and therapeutic ultrasound - to the diagnosis and treatment of diseases or disorders in a way that improves clinical outcome. His experience varies from in vitro studies to pre-clinical trials that he has developed or helped develop. Dr. Mourad has an extensive list of inter-disciplinary work, including co-inventing a novel means of guiding catheters into the ventricles of the brain and leading an effort to refine a means of altering focal brain function through transcranial delivery of focused ultrasound.


Clark Musselman

Clark Musselman, Ph.D.

Lecturer

Mathematics

Office: HH-1438
Email: musselc@uw.edu

Website

Dr. Musselman received his Ph.D. in applied mathematics from Michigan State University (MSU). He also holds a M.S. in mathematics from Oregon State University and a B.S. in physics and mathematics from Clarkson University.  Previously, he taught in both the Mathematics and Physics departments at Western Washington University.  Additionally, he spent two years at Bard College at Simon’s Rock, an early college in the Berkshire mountains of Western Massachusetts, where he taught all levels of undergraduate mathematics.

His scholarly work in mathematical physics and applied analysis uses Markov processes, semigroups, and spectral theory to understand the influence of disorder in physical models.

His primary goals as a mathematics teacher are to improve the confidence of his students by working through difficult ideas in supportive environments and, relatedly, to empower them to set high standards for themselves. Further, he aims to instill a sense of curiosity and commitment so that they may meet or exceed their personal goals both in college and after graduation.


Alexandria Musselman

Alexandria Musselman, Ph.D.

Lecturer

Mathematics

Office: HH-1436
Email: mussela@uw.edu

Website

Alexandria Theakston Musselman is finishing her Ph.D. in mathematics education at Michigan State University (MSU). She holds a M.S. in mathematics, also from MSU. Prior to coming to UW Bothell, she taught at Western Washington University and Bard College at Simon’s Rock in Massachusetts. She has experience teaching many undergraduate mathematics courses – ranging from remedial college algebra through calculus. Additionally, she has taught multiple mathematics courses for pre-service teachers.

Her personal research interests include understanding the purposes of school mathematics, exploring the promotion of equitable access to meaningful mathematics for all groups, and gaining insight into students' mathematical identities and experiences at the secondary and undergraduate levels.
 


Kaibao Nie

Kaibao Nie, Ph.D.

Sr. Lecturer

Electrical Engineering

Office: UWBB 224
Email: niek@uw.edu

Website

His expertise is in signal processing for biomedical applications. He has a Ph.D. in biomedical engineering from Tsinghua University, China. Dr. Nie has one year industrial experience developing signal processing algorithms for hearing aids working for Starkey Laboratories, Inc., Eden Prairie, MN. In addition, he has over 10 ye
ars of teaching experience at various institutions. Dr. Nie has published 7 papers. He is currently employed as a research professor at the University of Washington School of Medicine.


Pietro Paparella

Pietro Paparella, Ph.D.

Assistant Professor

Mathematics

Office: HH 1438
Email: pietrop@uw.edu

Website

Dr. Paparella earned a Ph.D. degree in mathematics from Washington State University in 2013, under the co-supervision of Judith J. McDonald and Michael J. Tsatomeros. Prior to his appointment at UWB, he was a visiting assistant professor in the department of mathematics at The College of William and Mary. His industry-experience includes a stint as a business analyst at Avista Corporation, where he was the lead-programmer and lead-modeler on a software-project to optimize Avista's energy portfolio. He was also a mathematics instructor at North Idaho College and Spokane Falls Community College, where he taught developmental mathematics courses.


His research interests lie in nonnegative matrix theory, matrix function theory, combinatorial matrix theory, linear algebra education, and the philosophy of mathematics. Currently, he is working on the nonnegative inverse eigenvalue problem, which is to characterize the spectra of nonnegative matrices.


Sohini Roy Chowdhury

Sohini Roy Chowdhury, Ph.D.

Assistant Professor

Electrical Engineering

Office: UWBB 223
Email: roych@uw.edu
Website

Sohini Roy Chowdhury received her  PhD in Electrical and Computer Engineering  from University of Minnesota in 2014 and M.S. from Kansas State University in 2010. Prior to that she received her Bachelors in Electronics and Communication Engineering from Birla Institute of Technology, Ranchi, in 2007.  She is the recipient of two best paper awards, one best poster award and one best paper finalist at the Institute of Engineering and Medicine Conference (2013), IEEE Asilomar Signals, Systems and Computers Conference (2012), IEEE Student Paper Contest Alborg University (2007) and Osmosis Student Paper Contest (2006), respectively.

Her current research interests include medical image processing, signal processing, pattern recognition, machine learning, artificial intelligence and Big Data.
 


Elaine Scott

Elaine Scott, Ph.D.

Professor and Dean
Mechanical Engineering

Office: Disc-452A
Email: scottep@uw.edu

Prior to coming to the University of Washington Bothell in August 2012, Dr. Elaine Scott was a professor in Mechanical Engineering at Virginia Tech, and also served on the faculty at Michigan State University, the University of Utah, and Seattle Pacific University. Dr. Scott holds bachelor and master degrees in agricultural engineering from the University of California, Davis, and doctoral degrees in agricultural engineering and in mechanical engineering from Michigan State University. Her research focuses on the characterization of heat transfer in complex materials, and she has authored over 100 journal and conference papers. She is a Fellow of the American Society for Mechanical Engineers.

Prof. Scott’s research interests are focused on characterizing complex thermal systems, including inverse, parameter estimation, and optimization problems related to bio-systems, power electronics, and aerospace systems. Her work related to bio-systems spans from modeling of quality loss in frozen foods to the estimation of blood perfusion, while her work in power electronics focuses on cooling of power electronics systems, and her work on aerospace systems focuses on parameter estimation of complex materials and estimation methods for high unsteady heat fluxes. She is also interested in research in engineering education and in enabling women and minority students to pursue careers in engineering. She has published over 100 refereed technical journal papers and conference proceedings, and has been involved with numerous government and industry sponsored projects in the areas of characterizing complex thermal systems and engineering education.


Linda Simonsen

Linda Simonsen, Ph.D.

Professor

Mathematics

Office: DISC-352B
Email: simonse@uw.edu

Dr. Linda Simonsen came to UW Bothell in 2010 from the Department of Mathematics at The University of Arizona. She received her Ph.D. in Mathematics Education from Oregon State University in 1995 and spent over a decade in the Department of Mathematical Sciences at Montana State University in Bozeman, MT.

Dr. Simonsen’s scholarly interests include making effective use of different modes of delivery to teach mathematics to diverse learners. In support of this objective, her research focuses on the nature and quality of mathematical discourse in hybrid and on-line settings. This research stems from her extensive work developing internet courses on the teaching of mathematics and statistics specifically designed to meet the needs of place-bound practicing mathematics and science teachers. Her research has been published in a variety of journals including the Journal of Distance Education (Revue de L’ Éducation À Distance), the Journal of Computers in Mathematics and Science Teaching, Mathematics and Computer Education, Teaching Children Mathematics, and FOCUS on the Learning Problems in Mathematics. Additionally, she secured funding to support her scholarly work from a variety of agencies including the National Science Foundation, the Environmental Protection Agency, the Steele-Reese Foundation, the Charlotte Martin Foundation, the Arizona Board of Regents, and the Montana Department of Education.


Cassandra Wright

Cassandra J. Wright, Ph.D.

Assistant Professor
Mechanical Engineering

Office: DISC 452 - H
Email: cjwright@uw.edu

Dr. Cassandra Wright received her M.S. and Ph.D. in Bioengineering at Clemson University, she previously received her B.S. in Mechanical Engineering at Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology.

Her research focuses on the development and characterization of novel biomaterials, including orthopaedic bearing material surfaces and electrically conducting polymers. A recent project focused on service-induced byproducts for localized drug delivery in orthopaedic implants.


Chancellor Wolf Yeigh

Wolf Yeigh, Ph.D.

Chancellor and Professor
Mechanical Engineering

Office: UWBX (Beardlsee Crossing) 101
Email:uwbchlr@uw.edu

Bjong Wolf Yeigh is the third chancellor of University of Washington Bothell. Prior to joining UW Bothell, Yeigh was professor and president of the State University of New York Institute of Technology (now SUNY Polytechnic Institute). He previously held the position of vice president for academic affairs and dean of the faculty at Norwich University, engineering dean at Saint Louis University, and assistant provost for science and technology at Yale University. He was on the engineering faculty at Oklahoma State University. He was elected a fellow of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers and serves on several national and state boards for engineering, economic development, public policy and education. 

He received his Ph.D. and M.A. in Civil Engineering and Operations Research at Princeton University, preceded by an M.S. in Mechanical Engineering at Stanford University and a Bachelor's in Engineering Science at Dartmouth College.


Jong Yoon

Jong Yoon, Ph.D.

Assistant Professor
Mechanical Engineering

Office: UWB Disc 452 - J
Email:wjyoon@uw.edu

Dr. Jong Yoon received his Master's and Ph.D. in Mechanical Engineering at the University of Washington, Seattle, preceded by his Bachelor's in Mechanical Engineering at Hong Ik University in Seoul, Korea.

From 1997 to 2001, Dr. Yoon worked with Samsung Electro-Mechanics, Korea, as a Research Engineer. He led Smart Medical Devices Lab (SMDL) in the Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, Qatar University, Qatar, from 2009 to 2014. His current research interests include design of multi-modal medical diagnostic devices; robot surgery; human computer interface; assistive/adaptive devices for the disabled. He targets for more practical and applicable engineering solutions in medical device applications.


Engineering & Mathematics Part-time Faculty



Abdelouahab Abrous

Abdelouahab Abrous

Adjunct Faculty
Mechanical Engineering

Office: Truly House
Email:wabrous@uw.edu


Roberto Altschul

Roberto Altschul, Ph.D.

Part-time Lecturer

Mathematics

Office: Truly 1st Floor
Email: altscr@uw.edu
Website


Walter Charczenko

Walter Charczenko, Ph.D.

Part-time Lecturer

Electrical Engineering

Office: Truly 1st Floor
Email: charcw@uw.edu

Dr. Charczenko has been working in the field of microwave devices and systems, electro-optics, integrated optics and high speed photonics for over 25 years. His key interests are on the topics of microwave photonics, microwave components and processing for Phased Array Antennas, analog fiber optic links, high data rate digital fiber optic modulation, optical signal processing for RF/fiber optic arrays, free space optical communications and laser radar systems. He also has a keen interest in all topics related to electromagnetic theory and its many uses. Currently, he is the technical lead on a number of programs related to extending fiber optic digital modulation techniques up to 100 Gbits/s and custom optical IC’s for signal processing in Microwave/Photonic Transmitters and Receivers. Dr. Charczenko received his Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering from the University of Colorado at Boulder. He has authored 20 papers in the field of microwaves and has lead team in 13 government-related projects.


Rania Hussein

Ariana Dundon

Part-time Lecturer
Mathematics

Office: HH-1432
Email: adundon@uw.edu
 


Rania Hussein

Rania Hussein, Ph.D.

Part-time lecturer

Mathematics

Office: UWBB-224
Email: rhussein@uw.edu

Website

Dr. Rania Hussein holds a Ph.D. of electrical engineering, MS of computer Science, and a BS. in computer engineering. Prior to joining UW, she was a research engineer at the Walt Disney Company where she used applied research to investigate emerging technologies such as big data, gamification, and mining the social media. She also has many years of experience working in higher education where she promoted undergraduate research besides teaching and mentoring students in computer science and engineering. She is passionate about promoting diversity in the workplace and empowering students to pursue education and careers in STEM. Additionally, she has taken leadership roles in establishing and running non profit organizations.

Dr. Hussein's interests are image processing, embedded systems, and emerging technologies.
 


 

Did You Know?

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