Events Archive (2011-2012)

A Personal History of Applied Innovation (Faculty Research Talk)

Tuesday, May 15, 2012
8:00 - 8:30pm
UW1-302

Mark Kochanski
Senior Lecturer
Computing & Software Systems (UW Bothell)

Abstract

Highlights from 30+ years of software development in industry with the challenges faced, the innovations delivered, and the application of the experience to academia.

About Mr. Kochanski

Mark Kochanski is a graduate of Purdue University where he studied both geology and computer sciences leading up to an M.S. in Economic Geology with a computer application-based thesis in 1984. Mark started working in the computing industry during high school in the mid-70s. From the mid-80s through early 90s,Mark worked in the petroleum industry developing application, enterprise, and industry-wide data models, databases, and user-friendly, data-oriented applications. In 1993, Mark started his successful independent consulting company, Albion Technology, which has provided technology expertise and IT support to a variety of business and organizations. In Mark's 25+ years in the computing field, he has provided computing expertise for a variety of companies from Exxon to startups, educational institutions, non-profit organizations, and the U.S. Government; worked in a variety of computing environments from palm to mainframe and from standalone to massively distributed; developed from device drivers, database engines, and middleware, to business and technical/scientific applications.

Mark's industry background and on-going experience with clients reinforces Mark's desire to help train quality software developers who can grow into technical leads, software architects, and beyond. Mark's technical interests includes anything database, user-friendly applications, component-based systems, XML, and other technologies that lead to creative solutions to difficult real-world problems.

Brogramming 101: How Sexism Is Bad For Tech & Bad for Your Sex Life

Monday, May 7, 2012
4:30 - 5:30pm
UW2-005

Alyssa Royse
Founder & Radio Host
NotSoSecret.com / Sexxx Talk Radio

Abstract

A quick look through the disturbing, and decidedly sexist, trend of "brogramming" in the tech world. We'll look at some possible causes and impacts, as well as how this trend is bad for everyone. There is no blame here, just some very blunt discussion of what sexism is, how it hurts and what might be a better approach to being cool, writing good code, building better businesses and even getting laid.

About Ms. Royse

Before starting NotSoSecret.com and hosting Sexxx Talk Radio for the Progressive Radio Network, Alyssa Royse was a veteran of the Seattle Tech Startup world. As the founder of the now-defunct JUST CAUSE Magazine and its accompanying web site, Alyssa was a pioneer in e-zine publishing. She was also the co-founder of Seattle 2.0, which was the first site dedicated entirely to building the Seattle Startup community and was recently sold to GeekWire. Although she is still building a tech startup, she is now surrounded entirely by women, and it is a very different experience. When she's not talking about sex, she can generally be found at the CrossFit gym that she's building with her boyfriend, playing with their 3 daughters or raising chickens, bees and bushels of organic veggies on their little farm in the city.

Socialbots: A Security Perspective

Monday, April 2, 2012
4:30 - 5:30pm
UW2-005 (via Skype)

Yazan Boshmaf
Ph.D. Student
University of British Columbia

Abstract

The ease with which we adopt online personas and relationships has created a soft spot that cyber criminals are willing to exploit. Advances in artificial intelligence make it feasible to design bots that sense, think and act cooperatively in social settings just like human beings. In the wrong hands, these bots can be used to infiltrate online communities, build up trust over time and then send personalized messages to elicit information, sway opinions and call to action.

In this talk, I will present an evaluation of how vulnerable Online Social Networks (OSNs) are to large-scale infiltration by socialbots: bots that control hijacked or adversary-owned OSN accounts and mimic the actions of real users. Specifically, I will describe one way to design and build a Socialbot Network (SbN): a group of programmable socialbots that are orchestrated in a command-and-control fashion. I will next present an analysis of users’ behavior in response to a large-scale infiltration using such an SbN, along with the corresponding security and privacy implications. Finally, I will close this talk by discussing how defending against socialbots raises a set of unique challenges that relate to web automation, online-offline identity binding and usable security.

About Yazan Boshmaf

Yazan Boshmaf is currently a PhD student at the University of British Columbia, Canada. He received his M.Sc. degree in Information Technology from the University of Stuttgart, Germany in 2008. His current research focuses on the security of large-scale social and information networks. Beyond that, his research experience also spans cross-disciplinary areas such as parallel and distributed systems, databases, and ubiquitous computing. He is a funded research member of the Canadian NSERC Internetworked Systems Security Network (ISSNet) and GRAND Network of Centers of Excellence (NCE), and is a holder of many awards and scholarships including an institutional doctoral fellowship.

I'm Not a Real Friend, But I Play One on the Internet

Wednesday, March 28, 2012
4:30 - 5:30pm
UW2-005 (via Skype)

Tim Hwang
Founder & Managing Partner
Pacific Social Architecting Corporation

Abstract

This talk examines the topic of socialbots -- realistic, automated bot identities online that are optimized to reliably elicit certain types of social behaviors in groups of users on platforms like Facebook and Twitter. Deployed en masse, large swarms of these bots are able to subtly (and not-so-subtly) shape the ways in which communities grow, connect and behave on these platforms. Insofar as people increasingly come to rely on these networks into the future, the bots hold the promise (and threat) of shaping not only the social universe of opinions and influence, but real world coordination and action among people as well. Ultimately, this talk will conclude on discussing how these bots suggest the evolution of classic social engineering into a broader social hacking -- which approaches human networks as if they were computer networks and applies similar principles for their compromise and defense against the social influence of third-parties.

About Tim Hwang

Tim Hwang is the founder and managing partner of the Pacific Social Architecting Corporation, a California-based research and development firm focusing on innovative technologies to enable precise, large scale social shaping online. He is also the co-founder of ROFLCon, a biennial conference bringing together various internet celebrities, scholars, and commentators to discuss the past, present, and future of memes and web culture. Formerly, he served as a research associate at the Berkman Center for Internet and Society at Harvard University and is director emeritus of the Web Ecology Project, a distributed research community around tracking culture online. He loves Choco Tacos.

Parallel Workbench for Real-Time Multi-Agent Individual-Based Simulation (Faculty Research Talk)

Wednesday, March 7, 2012
7:45 - 8:15pm
UW1-302

Dr. Munehiro Fukuda
Associate Professor
Computing & Software Systems (UW Bothell)

Abstract

This research develops software tools to feed live sensor data to multi-agent individual-based models, to run them in the cloud as parallelized real-time simulators, and to deliver the on-the-fly simulation results to mobile users. For this purpose, we will design a parallelizing library for these models, provide them with abstract accesses to sensor data, facilitate their dynamic migration over computing nodes for better performance, and develop GUI for mobile users. Our goal is to apply this workbench to orchard airflow computation, traffic simulation, battle games, and color-based image analysis whose results are given to farmers, drivers, and Internet users in real time.

About Dr. Fukuda

Dr. Munehiro Fukuda received a B.S. from the College of Information Sciences and an M.S. from the Master's Program in Science and Enginnering at the University of Tsukuba in 1986 and 1988. He received his M.S. and Ph.D. in Information and Computer Science at the University of California at Irvine in 1995 and 1997, respectively. He has worked in the hardware development of shared-memory multiprocessors at IBM Tokyo Research Laboratory from 1998 to 1993. During his Ph.D. and PostDoc study at UC Irvine from 1993 to 1997, he has focused on software technologies to coordinate parallel and distributed computations, using a navigational autonomy approach. During 1998-2001, he was an Assistant Professor in the Institute of Information Sciences and Electronics at the University of Tsukuba, where he has designed the M++ self-migrating threads to realize parallel execution of multi-agent applications. His research interests include mobile agents, multi-threading, cluster computing, grid computing and distributed simulations.

Human-Centered Design of Security Systems for Implantable Medical Devices

Monday, March 5, 2012
5:45 - 6:45pm
UW2-005

Ms. Tamara Denning
Ph.D. Student
University of Washington (CSE)

Abstract

Implantable medical devices (IMDs) improve patients' quality of life and help sustain their lives. In this study, we explore patient views and values regarding their devices to inform the design of computer security for wireless IMDs. We interviewed 13 individuals with implanted cardiac devices. Key questions concerned the evaluation of 8 mockups of IMD security systems. Our results suggest that some systems that are technically viable are nonetheless undesirable to patients. Patients called out a number of values that affected their attitudes towards the systems, including perceived security, safety, freedom from unwanted cultural and historical associations, and self-image. In our analysis, we extend the Value Sensitive Design value dams and flows technique in order to suggest multiple, complementary systems; in our discussion, we highlight some of the usability, regulatory, and economic complexities that arise from offering multiple options. We conclude by offering design guidelines for future security systems for IMDs.

About Ms. Denning

Tamara Denning is a fifth year PhD student at the University of Washington working with Tadayoshi Kohno in the Security and Privacy Research Lab. She received her B.S. in Computer Science from the University of California, San Diego in 2007 and her Master's degree from the University of Washington in 2009. Her main area of focus is the intersection of humans and computer security with a focus on emerging technologies.

Human-Centered Design and the Attenex Corporation Story

Wednesday, February 29, 2012
5:45 - 7:45pm
UW2-005

Skip Walter
Managing Director
Factor, Inc.

Abstract

Skip will tell the story about how Attenex Corporation (now part of FTI Consulting, Inc.) used human centered design and over 450 iterations since 2001 to create one of the top eDiscovery software products on the market. Learn more...

About Skip Walter

A software industry veteran, Skip Walter has more than 40 years of technology product development and executive management experience — across Fortune 1000 companies and start-up businesses. Skip was the Founding CEO and Chief Technology Officer of Attenex Corporation, which increases productivity by at least ten times in the legal electronic discovery process for litigation through visual analytics. Prior to Attenex, Skip was the Vice President of Engineering for Aldus (now Adobe) Corporation known for the PageMaker desktop publishing software. He was the father of Digital Equipment Corporation's ALL-IN-1, a $1 billion per year integrated enterprise office automation and email system. Skip is an advisory council member of the Electronic Discovery Reference Model consortium and is on the Dean's Advisory Council of the School of Informatics at Indiana University. Skip is currently the Managing Director of Factor, Inc., providing strategic planning and product roadmap design for startup technology companies pursuing social networking and visual analytics as well as eDiscovery strategic planning for Global 1000 corporations.

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Greatness (Faculty Research Talk)

Wednesday, February 22, 2012
7:45 - 8:15pm
UW1-302

Dr. David Socha
Assistant Professor
Computing & Software Systems (UW Bothell)

Abstract

I will touch on the various research projects I am working on. We are looking for students to help on some of these projects. All of these projects relate to creating more greatness in our world. One project is studying how to create and maintain great teams. This research team has created and is evolving a software system to do the Experience Sampling Method so that we can have participants take a quick survey up to 8 times a day about what they were doing at the moment their cell phone "beeps". Initially we are using this to study how learning the Core Protocols relates to people's ability to enter individual "flow" and what we are calling "multiperson flow".

There also is a set of projects related to a just beginning collaboration among people here at UW Bothell, UW Seattle, UW Tacoma, and industry focused on "reinventing University-level learning". One aspect of this is a collaboration with Skip Walter, Alan Wood, and Alan Wood’s students to redesign how he teaches his ELCBUS 464 History and Globalization course next quarter. We also are planning to use the same techniques in (a) a course that Sue Kraemer and I are designing for the Early Fall quarter, and (b) as part of a redesign of our core software engineering curricula (CSS 350, 360, 370) being pursued by a set of the CSS faculty. Finally, I am looking for a student for a project that includes building an online tool to help create teams with sufficient diversity.

About Dr. Socha

A fellow Husky, Dr. Socha received his Ph.D. in Computer Science and Engineering from the University of Washington. He also received his B.S. in Zoology from the University of Wisconsin and M.S. in Computer Science from the UW.

He has worked in a variety of software organizations as a programmer, architect, manager, teacher, ScrumMaster, product designer, change agent, and agile coach. His interests have consistently been on how to effectively design software and human systems, with the focus on the human and social aspects of software development.

“I am a pragmatist. A collaborator. An optimist. I look for simple solutions that address underlying design forces.”

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Comfortable Computing, Communal Computing, Content Consumption and the Creativity of Curation & Collage

Wednesday, February 15, 2012
5:45 - 6:45pm
UW2-005

Jofish Kaye, Ph.D.
Senior Research Scientist & Ethnographer
Nokia Research Center, Palo Alto

Abstract

The last two years have seen an explosion of growth in tablet computing. In this talk I discuss a qualitative interview-based study of 22 tablet owners living in the San Francisco Bay Area in which we tried to understand the role of tablet computing in their everyday lives. I use findings from this study to explore three key areas for research in computing: comfortable computing, recognizing and exploring the impact of computing environment on usage and vice versa; communal computing, the role of computing technologies and practices within the family; and content consumption, exploring the changing nature of creativity in a keyboard-less world.

About Dr. Kaye

His research explores the social, cultural, and Technological effects of technology on people, and how people impact those technologies.  These studies have recently included studies of families’ values and technology choices, visualizations of Twitter and publications, and the use of NFC-enabled phones to help track clean water supplies in Haiti.  His previous work has included ethnographic, cultural, critical and technological studies of grassroots creative leisure practices such as hacking and tinkering, academics' archiving practices, couples in long distance relationships, the role of women in computing, computerized smell output, and smart homes and kitchens.  He has a Ph.D in Information Science from Cornell, a Master’s degree in Media Arts & Sciences and a B.S. in Cognitive Science, both from MIT, and is a Consulting Assistant Professor at Stanford.

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BrainGrid: Building a GPU Infrastructure for Large Neural Simulations (Faculty Research Talk)

Wednesday, February 8, 2012
7:45 - 8:15pm
UW1-302

Dr. Michael Stiber
Professor & CSS Director
Computing & Software Systems (UW Bothell)

Abstract

The advent of relatively inexpensive graphics processing units (GPUs) that are capable of general-purpose computing has brought supercomputer-level performance to the desktop. However, taking advantage of this hardware to achieve significant speedup is a non-trivial exercise, with typical naive "porting" of software often yielding only a 2-4 times speedup.

In this talk, I review work in the UWB Biocomputing Laboratory on large-scale, long-duration neural simulation that has achieved over 20 times speedup for these demanding applications. I then outline the next stage of our work: developing reusable tools to help biologists and computational scientists move their projects to GPUs.

About Dr. Stiber

Dr. Stiber received a BS in Computer Science and a BS in Electrical Engineering from Washington University, Saint Louis, in 1983, and his MS and PhD in Computer Science from the University of California, Los Angeles, where he was a Research and a Teaching Assistant. He has held positions with Texas Instruments (Dallas, Texas), Philips (Eindhoven, Netherlands), and the IBM Los Angeles Scientific Center. He was an Assistant Professor in the Department of Computer Science at the Hong Kong University of Science & Technology during 1992-96 and a Research Assistant Professor in the Department of Molecular and Cell Biology at the University of California, Berkeley in 1996-97. Dr. Stiber is a frequent visitor to the Department of Biophysical Engineering at Osaka University (Japan). His research interests include: scientific data management and visualization, computational neuroscience, biocomputing, neuroinformatics, simulation, scientific computing, neural networks, autonomous systems, computer graphics, computer vision, nonlinear dynamics, and complex systems.

Dr. Stiber is on the executive committee of the Seattle chapter of the IEEE Computer Society, has served on organizing committees, chaired sessions, and reviewed papers for neural network and computational neuroscience conferences, and is a reviewer for Physica D, The Journal of Computational Neuroscience, and the Bulletin of Mathematical Biology.

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The Netflix Prize: How a public contest and dedicated amateurs changed the science of recommender systems.

Monday, February 6, 2012
8:00 - 9:15pm
UW2-005

Jeff Howbert
CSS Lecturer
University of Washington Bothell

Abstract

The Netflix Prize was the most widely followed machine learning competition in history. It offered a prize of $1,000,000 to anyone who could build a recommender system with an error rate at least 10% better than Netflix's internal system. Thousands of teams took part, and the contest lasted nearly three years. The speaker, a long-time active participant, will give an insider's perspective on two stories:

  1. The machine learning approaches used during the competition, and how they substantially advanced the science of recommender systems, and
  2. The unexpected emergence of two teams with winning scores, and their wild race to the finish.

About Dr. Howbert

Jeff Howbert received a BA in English from Stanford Univ. in 1977 and a PhD in Synthetic Organic Chemistry from Harvard Univ. in 1983. Over the ensuing 25 years, he led medicinal chemistry and drug discovery efforts at a large pharmaceutical company and several small biotech companies. He holds 41 US patents and is responsible for the entry of 6 compounds into clinical development. After earning a MS in Computer Science from Univ. of Washington in 2008, he began a second career in computational biology, with an emphasis on machine learning. He presently works in several labs on building predictive models for diverse biomedical problems, including seizure risk, cardiovascular biomarker discovery, and proteomic analysis. He is also currently teaching a course at UW Bothell on machine learning.

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Traceability and Provenance: Establishing Connections (Faculty Research Talk)

Wednesday, January 11, 2012
7:45 - 8:15pm
UW1-302

Dr. Hazel Asuncion
Assistant Professor
Computing & Software Systems (UW Bothell)

Abstract

Related information is often found in different locations and represented in different formats. Explicitly connecting these related information (referred as traceability or provenance) is useful in different domains since doing so provides an individual with information to support a particular task. For instance, in software engineering, relating the design to requirements aids in ensuring that the system to be developed meets customer requirements. In e-Science, identifying the relationships between intermediate data sets supports the repeatability of experiments. This talk will cover current projects within these two threads of research.

About Dr. Asuncion

Dr. Asuncion received her Ph.D. in computer science from the University of California, Irvine, in 2009. Prior to coming to UW Bothell, she was a Postdoctoral Researcher in the Institute for Software Research at the University of California, Irvine. She has also worked in industry in a variety of roles: as a software engineer at Unisys Corporation and as a traceability engineer at Wonderware Corporation where she designed a successful in-house traceability system.

Her research emphasis is on traceability and she has developed a novel software traceability approach that automatically links distributed and heterogeneous information. She has investigated the tracing of software license conflicts in heterogeneously composed software systems. Dr. Asuncion is also interested in investigating the traceability challenges in other domains such as e-Science and health care.

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Petabytes and Terawatts

Tuesday, October 18, 2011
Networking: 5pm - 5:30pm in UW1-370
Presentation: 5:45pm - 6:45pm in UW2-240

Jakob Homan
Senior Software Engineer
LinkedIn

Title

Petabytes and Terawatts: An overview of Hadoop and its ecosystem for processing today's big data needs

Abstract

Apache Hadoop has become the standard for processing previously unimaginable amounts of data on cheap, accessible hardware. This survey will cover what Hadoop is, how it works, the plethora of projects that have grown up around it, and how you too can get involved.

About Jakob

Jakob received a B.S. in Computing and Software Systems at the University of Washington Bothell. He is currently employed at LinkedIn working on integrating Hadoop into LinkedIn's data analysis pipeline.

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Did You Know?

More than 7,000 of UW Bothell's 12,000 alumni live and work in King and Snohomish counties.