Bachelor of Arts

Science, Technology and Society (STS)

   What is Science, Technology and Society?

How have the fields of science and technology evolved over time, and what does the future hold?  How should societies manage those fields to achieve just and sustainable communities?  The Science, Technology and Society (STS) major prepares students to address these important questions through an integrated approach to science, technology, and their relationships to culture, history, and society.

STS students work with faculty members trained in disciplines ranging from biology and mathematics to political economy and philosophy.  Housed in Interdisciplinary Arts and Sciences, the major enables students to develop their skills in scientific and technological research along with their capacities for critical, creative, and ethical reflection.  Students leave the program with the capacity to make informed decisions about the responsible use of science and technology -- as professionals and citizens.

Graduating STS students are prepared for careers with a wide variety of for-profit, not-for-profit, and governmental organizations that analyze, produce, and use scientific and technical knowledge.  These careers include planning and administration, public and investor relations, and advocacy and communications, among other areas.  STS students also pursue graduate and professional education in such fields as law, education, policy studies, and media and cultural studies. For more information about career possibilities or pursuing graduate school please click here.

STS Major Requirements

Prerequisites

1. Two quarters of a 100 or 200-level science sequence, which may be two courses from the same sequence OR the first course from any two different sequences.

  • BIS 250 and 251 (How Things Work) are recommended to satisfy this requirement.
  • Alternatively, students may take B BIO 180 and 200 (Introductory Biology) or their equivalents; B CHEM 142 and 152 (General Chemistry) or their equivalents; or B PHYS 114 and 115 (General Physics) or their equivalents; or B PHYS 121 (Mechanics) and B PHYS 122 (Electromagnetism & Oscillatory Motion) or their equivalents.
  • Other science courses may be accepted if they have a laboratory component and are designed for students expecting to major in the science field in which the sequence is offered.

2. BCUSP 123 (Functions, Models, and Quantitative Reasoning) or pre-calculus. 

Degree Requirements

  • BIS 300 Interdisciplinary Inquiry*(5 credits)
  • BISSTS 307 (5 credits)
  • BIS 315 (5 credits)
  • BES 301 (5 credits)
  • BIS 312 or BIS 340 (5 credits)
  • Social and Cultural Studies of Science (SCSS) Courses (15 credits)
  • Science Practice Courses (10 credits)
  • BIS 499 Portfolio Capstone (3 credits)
  • Additional IAS Coursework (15 credits)
  • General Electives (22 credits)
  • Completion of the IPR requirement and a minimum of 25 credits in each Area of Knowledge (with 10 credits ini each Area completed at UW Bothell)

TOTAL= 90 Credits

*Should be taken in the first quarter of IAS enrollment.

Note: Classes in this major are offered primarily during day time hours.

School of Interdisciplinary Arts and Sciences (IAS) Requirements & Policies

Interdisciplinary Practice & Reflection (IPR)

Within the above-listed 90 credits, students must complete the IPR requirement.

Areas of Knowledge

25 credits must be completed in each Area of Knowledge. At least 10 credits in each Area must be completed in courses offered by UW Bothell. The Areas of Knowledge are: Visual, Literary and Performing Arts (VLPA), Individuals and Societies (I&S), and Natural World (NW).

Multiply-designated courses may not be double-counted as fulfilling two Areas of Knowledge. Courses may apply to both an Area of Knowledge requirement and an STS major requirement.

Lower Division Credit Policy

Up to 35 credits of lower division (100-200 level) coursework taken at UW Bothell may be applied toward designated requirements within the 90 program credits. Please contact an IAS advisor for details.

Matriculated status

With the exception of the General Electives, courses taken to satisfy STS major requirements must be completed in matriculated status.

Admitted prior to Autumn Quarter, 2012?

Students admitted to the STS major prior to Autumn 2012 may be eligible to complete an older set of major requirements. Students with questions about their major requirements should contact an IAS advisor.

Science, Technology, and Society Learning Objectives

The Science, Technology, and Society curriculum advances the four core IAS learning objectives. Students taking courses and/or majoring in Science, Technology, and Society:

1) Think critically about how social processes shape mathematical, scientific, and technological knowledge.

2) Develop proficiency in cultural, social, and visual analysis of science, mathematics, and technology.

3) Develop proficiency in scientific and mathematical thinking through practice.

4) Be able to translate and communicate mathematical, scientific, and technological information to general and professional audiences.

5) Assess the risks, benefits, and ethical implications of applied science and technological knowledge.

Core and Affiliate Faculty and Staff

Crane

(Faculty Coordinator)

Buck

Price

Collins, S.

Servetnick

Estes

Turner

Hillyard

Wade

Kochanski

White

Ottinger

 
Please contact the STS Faculty Coordinator if you have any questions, concerns or ideas about the Science, Technology and Society major. To declare the STS major, please contact the CUSP office.

 

STS Resources

I was drawn to STS because the mix of challenging and fascinating classes matches my broad interests exactly and because it offers a way to understand the fast-paced and complex world in which we live. I am also looking forward to the new career possibilities open to me after I complete my degree. Rebecca Evans Class of 2010-11