Office of Research

Research-In-Progress Abstract

April 8th - Research in Progress

"History of the Wetlands"

Warren Gold, School of Interdisciplinary Arts and Sciences
LB1-205, 4:00 pm - 5:00 pm

The University of Washington, Bothell- Cascadia Community College campus is home to a vibrant 58-acre restored freshwater wetland and stream ecosystem. At the outset of the project in 1998, this was one of the largest and most complex floodplain restorations ever undertaken in the Pacific Northwest. It is a bold attempt to transform highly altered pastureland to a sustainable, functioning floodplain ecosystem within the rapidly urbanizing landscape of the North Creek Watershed. The project is unique in the degree to which fundamental theories of ecosystem and restoration ecology were utilized in the design and are being employed in the management of the site. This presentation will review the history of our campus site, the design and the implementation of the wetland restoration, and its managment, use, and ecological development since the completion of the initial installation in 2002.

 

April 15th - Research In Progress

"The UWB/CCC Wetlands Geo-Database: Mapping Boundaries, Hydrological Features and Plant Communities"

Hazel Asuncion, CSS; Warren Gold, SIAS; Santiago Lopez, SIAS; Charlotte Rasmussen, CUSP; Rob Turner, SIAS and students
LB1-205, 4:00pm - 5:00pm

The Geo-Database Working Group is developing a comprehensive UWB/CCC Geo-Database for research and teaching purposes that students, staff and faculty can use for independent, class and community–based projects that utilize the campus wetlands.  Using Geographic Information Systems (GIS) technology and protocols, we are developing the initial layer by mapping baseline boundaries of plant (vegetation communities), topographic and geomorphologic characteristics, and hydrological features of the UWB/CCC Wetlands. With the assistance of undergraduate research students, we have completed vegetation community mapping in the southwestern portion of the wetlands and are currently extending the mapping to other regions of the wetlands. Development of a comprehensive UWB/CCC Wetlands Geo-database will increase understanding of past, present and future change in the wetlands. The Geo-Database will allow students and faculty to better plan and execute investigations and analyze collected data spatially and temporally.


 

April 22nd - Research in Progress

"Place-Based Pedegogy: Teaching and Learning in the Wetlands"

TIPS/RIP Roundtable
LB1-205, 4:00 pm - 5:00 pm

Join Gary Carpenter (SIAS, CUSP), Ursula Valdez (CUSP) and Douglas Wacker (STEM) as they discuss how and why they have incorporated the wetlands into their teaching. Each instructor will present a brief overview of their wetlands-related pedagogy as well as resources and suggestions for instructors looking to integrate their course material with the wetlands. Facilitated by Erin Hill and Karen Rosenberg, Associate Directors of UW Bothell’s Teaching and Learning Center.

 

April 29th - Research in Progress

"Vancomycin Resistant Enterococci from Crows and their Environment"

Marilyn Roberts, School of Public Health
LB1-205, 4:00 pm - 5:00 pm

TBA.

 

May 13th - Research in Progress

"Fecal Coliform and Nutrient Dynamics in North Creek, the Wetlands and Campus Runoff"

Rob Turner, School of Interdisciplinary Arts and Sciences
LB1-205, 4:00 pm - 5:00 pm

Throughout the past year UWB environmental science students have been monitoring the coliform bacteria levels on the UWB/CCC campus, in our wetland, and in our reach of North Creek.  This monitoring was motivated by the discovery last year of unusually high fecal coliform counts in North Creek within the campus boundaries. The objectives of our study are to: 1) assess variability in coliform bacteria counts in North Creek as it flows onto and across our campus; 2) quantify coliform bacteria counts in the ponds, streams, depressions and bioswales of the wetland; 3) assess inputs of coliform bacteria from the campus uplands to the wetland; 4) identify sources of the coliform bacteria; and 5) evaluate the potential for the campus and its wetland to act as a source of fecal coliform bacteria to North Creek.  Our working hypothesis is that the presence of a major crow roost on campus, with as many as 15,000 crows roosting overnight in the winter months, is a primary source of elevated coliform levels on campus, in the wetland, and in our reach of North Creek.  This presentation will provide an overview of the methods of our team research and our findings to date.

 

May 20th - Research in Progress

"Temporal and Spatial Dynamics of a Seasonally Changing Crow Roost: Effects on Soil Mesofauna and Plant Communities"

Doug Wacker, Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics
LB1-205, 4:00 pm - 5:00 pm

TBA.

 

May 27th - Research in Progress

"Crow Impact on Invasive Speices Proliferation"

Warren Gold & Students Ian Barlow, School of Interdisciplinary Arts and Sciences & Holly Zox, Edmonds CC
LB1-205, 4:00 pm - 5:00 pm

Crows maintain a diverse diet that includes fruits of berry-producing shrubs and trees in the Pacific Northwest. With the large population of crows on campus there is a reasonable chance that they could be consuming fruits of non-native plants in the regional landscape and depositing their seeds in our wetland during the nightly crow roost in the wetlands. Preliminary observations in the crow roost area revealed seedlings of non-native plant species that are typically dispersed by birds. Our study is investigating the potential role of crows in facilitating non-native plant species invasion into the campus wetlands using both field and greenhouse studies.

In the field we are examining seedlings emerging in different vegetation communities, comparing plots within the most active winter crow roost to those outside of the winter crow roost. We are also collecting soil samples from these communities and locations and tracking the species germinating from these samples over time in the greenhouse. These data will help us understand the pattern of non-native plant species incursion into the campus wetlands and whether crows might be playing a significant role such invasions.

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January 14 - Research in Progress

"Mash-ups and Mishaps: Viral Data and Digital Transmission Vectors"

Jason Pace, Digital Futures Lab
LB1-205, 4:00 pm - 5:00 pm

Our lives are increasingly quantified and digitized - from performance capture in cinema to trending topics on Twitter to the omnipresent cameras that capture and post every unfortunate decision we make, the data output of our species continues to double every two years. Partnering with data generation, of course, are its typical cohorts storage, retrieval, manipulation and presentation. As access speeds increase and tools for manipulation and presentation become more accessible to a wide audience, the rise of maker culture, flash memes, global mobile device proliferation and real-time processing for the masses creates a daily experience where the fuzzy distinction between fantasy and reality isn't just a philosophical debate, but rather a daily gauntlet that can be exhausting to navigate. In a world of fat data pipes feeding terabytes of data to end users 24x7, curated consumption is a requirement for us to maintain sanity. This introductory session to out winter Data in the Digital Age Research in Progress series frames questions around some of the unique opportunities and challenges presented by endless streams of micro and macro data.

January 21 - Research In Progress

"Data Processing and Display in the Context of Medical Devices: An Instructive Example"

Pierre Mourad, Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics
LB1-205, 4:00pm - 5:00pm

Medical devices represent a specialized example of a human/device interface that involves use of digital data. In addition to technical issues that inform the construction, processing and display of information to a practicing physician, regulatory concerns also come into play, in sometimes surprising ways. In this talk I'll highlight a recent medical device invention constructed here at UW. I'll pay particular attention to its data flow, then concentrate on the various forces that constrain how we can optimally display the medical information this device can offer to the working physician. It will turn out likely that 'less is more' in this context.

January 28 - Research in Progress

"Sponsors of Policy: A Network Analysis of Wealthy Elites, their Affiliated Philanthropies and Charter School Reform in Washington State"

Wayne Au, Education
LB1-205, 4:00 pm - 5:00 pm

Charter school policy has evolved into a major component of the current education reform movement in the United States. Using social network analysis, this study maps relations of individuals and organizations connected to the successful campaign to pass Initiative 1240, which legalized charter schools in Washington State. The primary finding of this study is that wealthy elites, through both individual contributions and the funding streams provided by their affiliated philanthropies, exerted a disproportionate influence over charter school law compared to average citizens in Washington State, raising important questions with regards to the relationship between wealth, power, democracy and education reform.

February 11 - Research in Progress

"Distributed Trust in Pervasive Systems"

Brent Legesse, Computing and Software Systems
LB1-205, 4:00 pm - 5:00 pm

Providing seamless and transparent access to computing resources in pervasive systems heavily depends on secure access to those resources.  Pervasive environments often result in challenges such as openness, intermittent connectivity, heterogenous systems, and resource constrained devices that cause many traditional security mechanisms to fail.  As a result, many researchers have utilized distributed trust mechanisms to overcome these obstacles.  This talk will provide an overview of distributed trust and discuss challenges and opportunities in securing pervasive systems.

February 18 - Research in Progress

"Telling the Story of Environmental Inequities: A GIS Approach to TRI Data"

Gwen Ottinger, David Headrich and Chris Wright, School of Interdisciplinary Arts and Sciences
LB1-205, 4:00 pm - 5:00 pm

The national Toxics Release Inventory (TRI) makes available copious data about the quantities of toxic chemicals released to the air, land, and water by the industrial facilities across the United States, and websites linked to TRI data make it easy for the average person to know what toxins are in her neighborhood. But pollution is not equally distributed across the country - a fact that is lost in the place-by-place approach of existing tools for accessing TRI data. In this project, part of the EPA's TRI University Challenge, we aim to visualize data in a way that shows the inequitable distribution of toxic releases. We explain how we are using Geographic Information Systems (GIS) to identify the most striking patterns of inequitable distribution along the lines of race, class, and region, and how finding these patterns in the data will enable us to create a visually and emotionally engaging multimedia experience that tells the story of environmental inequity in the U.S.

February 25 - Research in Progress

"Understanding the Impact of Economic Geography on U.S. Audit Markets: Promises and Challenges"

Rajib Doogar, Business
LB1-205, 4:00 pm - 5:00 pm

The analysis of local audit markets, primarily at the level of Metropolitan Statistical Areas (MSAs) has been one of the most exciting innovations in auditing scholarship over the past decade. By formally incorporating into the analysis economic characteristics of local markets, this literature has drawn attention to impact of market micro-structure on audit market outcomes (audit fees, auditor opinions or various proxies for audit quality). As a result, the use of city-level measures of auditor market presence and measures of audit market concentration and competition is now fairly ubiquitous in accounting and auditing research. Reflecting the explosive but somewhat piecemeal growth of the related literature, there is at present very little scholarly work that takes a big picture view of the economic geography of U.S. public company audit markets over the past decade and presents in one place some basic results that future research can build upon. The primary objective of our study is to fill this gap.

March 11 - Research in Progress

"Abracadata: Artists' Books in the Digital Age"

Amaranth Borsuk, School of Interdisciplinary Arts and Sciences
LB1-205, 4:00 pm - 5:00 pm

Many contempory book artists and writers rely on the availability of textual "data." Whether plucking eerily distorted images from Google Street View, generating alphabetized indices to Shakespeare's sonnets, or redacting the 9/11 Commission Report to generate a book-length poem, these creators are mining data for aesthetic ends. Given that artists' books have historically relied on the words and images of others, what makes this situation novel? My current project Abra takes part in this conversation by exploring and celebrating the potentials of the book in the 21st century. A collaboration with Kate Durbin, Ian Hatcher, and a potentially infinite number of readers, the project merges physical and digital media, integrating a hand-made artist's book with an interactive iPad app to play with the notion of the "illuminated" manuscript. Funded by an Expanded Artists' Books Grant from the Center for Book and Paper Arts at Columbia College Chicago, the project will launch in the late spring.

April 30 - Research in Progress

"The Double Bind of Dharun Ravi: Homophobia, Xenophobia, and the Work of Gayatri Chakravorty Spivak"

Rahul K. Gairola, Ph.D.
LB1-205
4:00p - 5:00p
 

Gayatri Chakravorty Spivak’s essay “Can the Subaltern Speak?” (1988) famously engaged a critique of a number of white, Western male theorists including Marx, Foucault, and Deleuze.  The essay critically placed the woman of color in the role of sati where her sexuality was positioned as “white men saving brown women from brown men.”  The essay examined the figure of sati as a fatal alibi for upper class, patriarchy to silence and obliterate articulations of subaltern subjects while problematically acknowledging that that very subject transcends subalternty at the moment of utterance.  Jumping forward almost a quarter of a century, Spivak’s newest work titled An Aesthetic Education in the Era of Globalization (2012) illuminates the dismal plight of the humanities as teachers and students alike negotiate the vicissitudes of the double bind, or the static positioning of being caught in an identificatory binary from moment to moment.  How does this divergent work, separated by 24 years of history and scholarship production, come together in the context of race and the South Asian diaspora in the US?  This paper argues that Spivak’s work condenses on the figure of Dharun Ravi, a former Rutgers University freshman who was recently tried for the invasion of privacy when he used his web cam to view Clementi and a male partner in an intimate moment.

The knowledge of this intrusion drove Tyler Clementi, his roommate, to commit suicide by jumping off the George Washington Bridge in New York City, and was one of many tragedies that inaugurated a national movement against teen bullying.  While Clementi would not live to experience the popular aphorism “it just gets better” that has been made famous the past few years by Dan Savage of the “It Gets Better Project,” the court case of Dharun Ravi produced a media spectacle of sorts.  It ranged from a complete condemnation of bullying against gay, suicidal teens to an online movement to “Deport Dharun Ravi.”  This paper reads Ravi as the quintessential media spectacle of Spivak’s double bind in the context of twenty-first century racism as the global economy constricts: both immigrant and emigrant at the same time under neoliberal homonormativity – itself caught in a double bind that pulls on two ends of a knot that tighten yet brings closer together homophobia and xenophobia.  Finally, the paper unearths the “white men saving white men from brown men” media discourse that attended the racist xenophobia against Ravi and his family to demonstrate that two lives would be ruined from the fatal mistake made by one.  These range from media caricatures of Ravi as cold, to his father as a “slight man” and his mother’s over-zealous concern of her son’s lack of appetite.

Rahul K. Gairola teaches at Seattle University and the University of Washington (UW), where he completed a joint PhD in English Literature and Critical Theory in December 2009.  He has held research fellowships at Pembroke College, Cambridge, the School of Criticism and Theory at Cornell University, the Humboldt University of Berlin, the UW Department of English, and the Simpson Center for the Humanities.  He has published and delivered papers widely at home and abroad, and is revising a book manuscript titled Homelandings: Diasporic Genealogies of (Be)longing and Nation along with a few other pieces.  He sits on the Executive Committee of the South Asian Literary Association (SALA), and served as Co-Chair of its annual conference in Seattle in January 2012.

May 13 - Research in Progress

Title: “Cognitive Radio: Its Promises and Challenges”

Tad Ghirmai, Ph.D.
LB1-205
4:00p - 5:00p


Abstract: Cognitive Radio is a technology that aims to address the spectrum scarcity problem facing many countries.  Traditional spectrum assignment has been based on fixed spectrum access policy in which licensed users are allocated a dedicated bandwidth.  The explosion of new wireless services in the last two decades has resulted in spectrum scarcity because most of the available spectrum has been allocated.  However, recent studies showed that a large portion of the licensed spectrum is underutilized, and the spectrum scarcity problem is mainly a result of inefficient spectrum allocation policy.  To address the problem, therefore, a dynamic spectrum access policy (DSA) is proposed. DSA allows access to a spectrum by unlicensed (secondary) users in a manner that would not compromise the operations of the licensed (primary) user.  Cognitive radio promises to realize dynamic spectrum access policy by designing radios that intelligently detect unused spectrum and change their transmission parameters to adapt to the new environment.  However, designing a truly cognitive radio is challenging. This presentation provides an overview of the challenges in the design of cognitive radio from signal processing perspective.

May 21 - Research in Progress

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Cheryl Cooke, Ph.D.
LB1-205
4:00p - 5:00p

 

Abstract: Some of the historical discourses about nurses were that we were witches and whores, discrediting us as healers. While social understanding about who nurses are and what we do has changed over time, there are other populations of women about whom we can learn based on the social discourses about them. Understanding these discourses can offer important information about a group's assigned place in society, and the people who assign them. In my research, I study the population of women who are in relationships with incarcerated men. The majority of these women and men are low income, poorly educated, and many are of Color. My prior work was focused on studying this population of women in order to design appropriate interventions. However, I have come to realize

that looking for specific interventions cannot occur outside the set of social discourses about these women that shape their experiences, behaviors, and abilities to act in their own best interest. Working from a critical, feminist perspective, my research is now moving away from developing specialized interventions and towards a more nuanced

understanding the broader social discourses that impact these women's abilities to act. I believe that prior to developing any comprehensive intervention, as researchers our understanding needs to take into account the broader social contexts that are at play. In this talk, I will describe both the micro level, individual experiences among this population, as well as the macro, group level at which these women's experiences and identities are presented in society.