First Year and Pre-Major Program (FYPP)

Autumn 2018 Discovery Core I

AUTUMN 2018 DISCOVERY CORE OPTIONS 

 

10-Credit Discovery Core Options

 

Place and Displacement in the Americas: Human Rights, Culture, and Ethnicity
10 credits

Monday/Wednesday 1:15 PM - 5:30 PM
B CORE 104A, VLPA and B CORE 107A, I&S - Must select both
Instructors: Jennifer Atkinson and Amparo Padilla

This course explores physical and social spaces, asking how said places and the peoples who inhabit(ed) them are shaped by race, social class, ethnicity, and human rights. Our analysis spans South, Central, and North America and draws on film, fiction and poetry, social science, journalism, and testimony. This course asks a variety of questions, including: What are human rights, social justice, and environmental justice?  What does diaspora mean, and how do human rights violations lead to the relocation of peoples and recreation of their communities? How does the meaning of place vary among social and economic groups, and how do problems like poverty, environmental injustice, and discrimination affect how places are imagined and experienced?  What are some ways that marginalized groups re-shape their relations to place through cultural productions like memorials, literature, and art? Case studies in displacement will include homelessness in U.S. cities, mass incarceration of African-Americans, Central American refugees, Mexican immigration, Native American reservations, transgender youth, among other topics.

Heads in the Cloud: Mapping and Imagining
10 credits

Monday/Wednesday 10:15 AM – 1:05 PM (33% Hybrid - Additional hours will be required outside of class time)
B CORE 104B, VLPA and B CORE 107B, I&S  - Must select both
Instructors: Theodore Hiebert and Jin-Kyu Jung

New technology is changing the ways we think, understand, remember, love, politic and play. Heartbeats can now be sent from one watch to another. Brainwaves can be used to control video games. Our phones know where we are, and often, remind us of things we have forgotten or things we didn't even know yet. We are surrounded by data, virtual signals and quantum particles but also by creative forms of expression, activism and communication. 

This class invites first-year students to put their head in the clouds thinking about the complexities and possibilities of the technological landscape. Together we will think about what it means to map the relationships of art, technology, visualization, and space, focusing on new digital art and spatial technologies that provide us with unprecedented possibilities for representing and imagining the world around us, and how they can be productive and revealing. Students will learn how artistic practices can be integrated with the critical geographic imagination, and will have a chance to produce creative works in artistic and visual forms. The class aims to open up an interdisciplinary way of questioning our experiences of the world, by exploring ways of mapping and imagining them. 

Our Home in the Forest: Ecology, Literature and Culture
10 credits

Tuesday/Thursday 11:00 AM – 3:15 PM
B CORE 104B, VLPA and B CORE 110E, NW - Must select both
Instructors: Jennifer Atkinson and Warren Gold

Why do forests matter? What roles do they play as natural systems on our planet, as homes and resources for human communities, and in our popular imagination? This course explores those questions by introducing students to forest ecology and the forested realms of literature, film, and culture.

This course will use the multidisciplinary framework of ecology to examine how forests function and respond to human use from a local to global scale. Students will explore the global diversity of forests to provide context for a more in-depth examination of forests in the Pacific Northwest. We will examine the interplay of living and nonliving components of local forest ecosystems, the natural goods and services they provide to human societies, and forest response to human management and environmental change. This scientific basis will allow the class to develop a deeper understanding of the roles forests play in critical current events such as widespread fires and climate change.

In addition to developing scientific knowledge, our course also explores relations to the forest through the lens of the humanities, examining how writers, poets and filmmakers have represented these places across different cultures and historical moments. We emphasize that successfully addressing today's environmental challenges requires more than just scientific and political action; it also requires us to look to the realms of human imagination to the stories, images, attitudes and emotions that shape our views and behavior. To this end, students will read a range of literary works from Classical mythology, fairy tales and popular children's literature to Native American poetry, U.S. nature writing, and contemporary science fiction. This analysis will include representations of forests in film and the visual arts as well. Class time will involve lots of discussion, interpretation of texts, creative and analytic writing, and excursions into what Thoreau called "The solid earth!  The actual world!"(i.e. field trips to North Creek Forest and other wooded sites in our region).

By taking this interdisciplinary approach, students will be introduced to the different ways the humanities and natural sciences pose questions and analyze problems. They will also develop a deeper understanding of why forests are essential to the health of our planet and the survival of countless species, as well as the vitality of human stories, art, culture, and identity.

 

10-Credit Linked Classes (DC + Composition class)

 

The Politics and Practice of Yoga
10 credit linked courses

Monday/Wednesday 1:15 PM – 5:30 PM
B CORE 104E, VLPA  and B WRIT 134M, C - Must select both
Instructor: Alice Pederson

According to market research, 28% of all US Americans have "practiced" yoga at one point or another. This is due, in no small part, to the many and varying reasons that it is prescribed and recommended - from building strength and flexibility, to calming down and managing stress, to treating chronic pain and illness, yoga seems to be the modern cure-all. In this class, we will critically examine the roles, meanings, and values of yoga in contemporary US society. Topics will include the arrival of yoga in the US and its acculturation as a primarily non-spiritual practice, the flourishing of the yoga industry, research on neuroscience and the mind, and issues of cultural appropriation, equity, and access in the greater-Seattle yoga community. Students will be expected to participate in the local yoga economy as participant-observers and think critically about their own positions as consumers, researchers, and critics within this thoroughly modern tradition. We will also integrate movement and contemplative practice into our class sessions. Through our analyses and experiences of contemporary yoga, we will mark the process of "discovering" ourselves as college students on this campus. Assignments will lead you to engage with campus resources such as the library, the Writing & Communication Center, and the Qualitative Skills Center, among others.

Our work in Interdisciplinary Writing will extend and add depth to our discussions on yoga. Through the practices of close reading, analyzing, drafting, reviewing, and revising, we will develop the skills necessary to becoming an effective writer for the rest of your college career and hopefully beyond! We will also ask questions about writing itself: who decided what "good writing" is in the first place? How do we know if we're doing it? How does our writing change, depending on audience and context? How can we use genre and conventions to signal and play with what we're trying to say? This class will challenge you to reconsider the role and place of writing in your life, and welcome you to develop a strong sense of yourself as a college writer.

By taking these two courses together, we are able to develop a profounder and more nuanced understanding of the texts and issues that we discuss in B CORE 104. By using rhetorical analysis and setting texts "into conversation," we will deepen our engagement with the material and cultivate our own writerly voices in order to add to the conversation. 

Gender Under Construction
10 credit linked courses

Tuesday/Thursday 8:45 AM - 1:00 PM
B CORE 107C, I&S and B WRIT 134N, C - Must select both
Instructor: Lauren Lichty

What is gender and how does it differ from sex? How has our understanding of gender changed over time? How does gender intersect with other categories of difference, such as race, class, sexuality and nationality?

Through active inquiry we will develop a set of tools to look at these questions and examine how gender operates in our lives and the spaces we inhabit. As a composition class, we will focus on improving our college-level reading, writing, revising, communication, presentation and facilitation skills. We will adopt a process-oriented approach, meaning that we will work through multiple drafts, revisions, rewrites, and reflections. 

We will apply these composition tools to explore:

  •     Gender as a social construction at the intersection of other categories of difference, such as race, class, sexuality, and nationality
  •     How gender norms may serve as roadblocks for individuals and groups
  •     Cases where people resist gender norms to uncover unspoken assumptions that animate and legitimize gender roles that we may have accepted as "natural"
  •     The ways gender norms manifest in personal relationships, including relationship violence
  •     Detours and new pathways for enacting gender
 

5-Credit Discovery Core VLPA Options (some cross-listed as B CORE 110, NW)

 

Understanding the Natural World at the Intersection of Art and Science
5 credits

Monday/Wednesday 8:45 AM - 10:45 AM
B CORE 104E, VLPA or B CORE 110A, NW - Select one only
Instructor: Gary Carpenter and Salwa Al-Noori

This co-taught 5-credit Discovery Core I course introduces students to the intersection of art and science in developing a deeper understanding of the natural world. The sciences and the arts as valuable research tools have propelled discovery and informed each other throughout history. In anatomy and physiology, the intersection of these disciplines provides a more complete understanding of the close correlation of structure and function in biology. From Leonardo da Vinci's depiction of human anatomy and biological processes through observation and the arts, to Santiago Ramon y Cajalâ's pioneering drawings of brain cells in the field of neuroscience, our history is rich in examples that highlight the collaboration and intersection of science and art. Furthermore, the contribution of artistic perspectives to the understanding of biological science necessitates, in turn, an appreciation for the contribution of science as an inspiration for art.

This course examines the relationship of structure (morphology/anatomy) and function (physiology) through a variety of artistic mediums (drawing, painting, sculpting, graphics, etc.) improving observational skills and enhancing critical thinking.  Creativity and innovation help students address natural world explorations into "why our brains are structured the way they are," "why the inside of the kidney looks like it does," "what allows a plant to breathe" and "what the transport system in plants looks like" and many more such questions. Individual and group projects will culminate in an exhibition highlighting the symbiotic relationship between art and science.  This course brings together a scientist and an artist with a mutual appreciation of these disciplines as research methodologies and meets the FYPP Learning Goals of critical and creative inquiry and communication. 

Welcome to College, Take This Quiz!: A Link Between College's Media (Mis)representation and Personality Assessments
5 credits

Tuesday/Thursday 3:30 PM - 5:30 PM
B CORE 104F, VLPA
Instructor: Peter Brooks

Long before you even thought of college, the entertainment industry (film, television, video games, etc.) has constructed their own interpretation of college life: larger brick buildings, lush campus green spaces, lively students of all personality types, etc. Coupled with potential societal and parental perspectives that students may hear, these representations can impact and shape students expectations for their first year of college. Likewise, as students try to figure out their campus community, they're also trying to learn about themselves. While a movie or TV show cannot necessarily tell us who we are, academics have designed tests and quizzes to aid us on a journey of self-discovery. Our course will be dedicated to both demystifying/discussing the different visual representations of college seen in popular movies, TV shows, and other media, and exploring different personality assessments through analytical/reflective means. Thus, in addition to potentially watching and critiquing films such as Higher Learning and Accepted for how they teach us about college, students will also take a range of personality assessments (from Myers-Briggs to Which Hogwarts House Do You Belong In?). Students will practice a combination of written critical analysis, self-reflection, and creative visual design in order to explore who they are and how the UW Bothell community represents itself. Moreover, in order to bridge the first year experience with our academic objectives, students will also participate in a small group activity that investigates the way different parts of campus (departments, services, programs) represent themselves through visuals and text. Finally, this course will help students construct their Discovery Core portfolio on their journey of constructing themselves!

Words, Voice, Movement: Reimagining Performance
5 credits

Tuesday/Thursday 11:00 AM - 1:00 PM
B CORE 104G, VLPA
Instructors: Deborah Hathaway

In Words, Voice, Movement we will work both individually and collectively to create original performances in a supportive and interactive classroom community. This introduction to performance and creative writing will allow you to find a deeper connection to your own words and the words of others, develop your artistic voice, and use movement and physicality to convey ideas. Through active participation in in-class writing, acting, and movement exercises, you will develop skills for devising performance projects and creating original compositions. The work we do in class will give you a significant amount of practice expressing yourself in writing and in speaking in front of others--which will translate into skills and tools that are relevant in other classes and workplace contexts. My hope is that you will leave this course with a greater capacity for self-expression and connection to others.

Seeing is Believing
5 credits

Tuesday/Thursday 3:30 PM – 5:30 PM
B CORE 104H, VLPA
Instructor: Howard Hsu

Seeing is Believing, introduces students to both the science of light and the photographic recording of light for personal expression. During the course, students will be introduced to the following topics and concepts: photography as a means of communication and an art form, the physical properties of light and its effect in the natural world, philosophical and early theories on light, and historical and contemporary photographers. The course will include in-class labs, demonstrations of physical properties of light and photographic principles, a research paper exploring a scientific phenomenon of light, and culminate with a personal photographic essay/series for the final project.

Philosophical Explorations of Science Fiction
5 credits

Monday/Wednesday 11:45 AM - 1:05 PM (33% Hybrid - Additional hours will be required outside of class time) 
B CORE 104I, VLPA or (B CORE 104L, VLPA for BFYBSN students only) - Select one only
Instructor: David Nixon

This course will explore philosophical and ethical questions of humanity through analysis of science fiction film and text. We are interested in the thresholds between humans and machines, emotions and logic, bodies and minds, and disrupting the binary divisions that govern social relations among Earthlings. We will also consider how the narratives and technologies of science fiction already pervade our lives and shape our identity and everyday interactions. Throughout this course, we emphasize how science fiction exaggerates or magnifies real issues of social justice, and imagines futures where oppressions based on gender, race, class, sexuality, and ability are either intensified or resolved, often, though not always, through technological means. This course involves frequent creative writing exercises and students author an original science fiction short story as final project.

Dead Things & The Art of Fear in the Written and Spoken Word
5 credits

Tuesday/Thursday 8:45 AM - 10:45 AM
B CORE 104J, VLPA or (B CORE 104K, VLPA for BFYBSN students only) - Select one only
Instructor: Gavin Doyle

Through study, discussion, & analysis of classic horror stories and films (from Gothic & Victorian to present), students investigate the reasons we're drawn to terror. After investigating the time period each works was written, students create new works (assignments range from photography and short story creation, to a campus Ghost Storytelling Event in October). Students gain an understanding of how societal changes affect the fears expressed artistically. Student works will reflect present fears of the class allowing them to reflect on issues relevant to their communities. In terms of performance, students can expect to share and critique photographic assignments and writings; perform radio play versions of the assigned readings through UWave radio or online; and to stage an adapted one-act play based on the classic horror stories.

 

5-Credit Discovery Core I&S Options (some cross-listed as B CORE 110,  NW)

 

Mythbusters!

This class is for students in the STEM Living Learning Community
5 credits

Monday/Wednesday 3:30 PM - 5:30 PM
B CORE 107D, I&S - for students in the STEM Living Learning Community
Instructor: Charity Lovitt

What does it mean to do science? We aren't here to focus on learning the right equations, codes, or formulas to answer any particular question, but to spend time discussing, practicing, and reflecting on what it means to be a scientist. Science is done by individuals with scientific habits of curiosity, skepticism, critical thinking, honesty, teamwork, communication, and persistence. During this class, you will learn the norms of scientific investigation by studying scientists from the past and meeting scientists of today. We will also explore how these norms are communicated between scientists and the general public by reviewing readings, case studies, and online resources. Then, deriving inspiration from the TV show Mythbusters! you will have to opportunity to investigate specific myths that exist about the natural world, the digital world, and science in general. You will then share the results of your investigation by creating an interesting and informative video that can be used to share the real story behind that myth to the public! 

The Half Marathon: What it takes to run 13.1 miles
5 credits

Tuesday/Thursday 1:15 PM-3:15 PM
B CORE 107E, I&S
Instructor: Kim O’Neill

This course will use the half marathon as a means to explore goal setting, human performance, exercise physiology, and the recreation running industry. Students will develop their own half marathon training program and will have the opportunity to apply what they learn by training for, and potentially completing, a half marathon. Progressive training for the 13.1 mile event will include walking, running, and core strengthening, as well as stretching, hydration, nutrition, and injury prevention. In addition, students will evaluate their own physiologic characteristic related to human performance, such as lactate threshold and VO2MAX, and explore psychological limitations to performance. The course will also explore the multi-billion dollar running industry, including touring of a major running shoe retailer and volunteering at a local road race.

Farm to Fork (Fa2Fo): Local 2 Global Perspectives
5 credits

Fridays 11:00 AM - 3:15 PM
B CORE 107F, I&S or B CORE 110D, NW - Select one only
Instructors: Mo West and Annie Bruck

Our day-to-day decisions surrounding food have important personal and local to global community consequences. Misinformation and conflicting messages about the quality, safety and health benefits of our food supply are common, making it difficult to know what to eat, as well as where to buy and how best to prepare various foods. In this course we will integrate topics that include understanding select historical and cultural paradigms of food cultivation and consumption; identifying major nutrition problems and guidelines; generating sustainable solutions from individual, local, and global perspectives; and participating in a community food service project.  Fundamental to the journey throughout this course will be advancing students' familiarity with campus resources, the assurance of at least two reflective essay contributions to students' e-portfolio.

Art and Politics of Walking
5 credits

Monday/Wednesday 8:45 AM - 10:45 AM
B CORE 107G, I&S
Instructor: Jason Lambacher

Walking, like eating, breathing, and sleeping, is for many of us an unremarkable part of being alive, something we do without much consciousness or attention.  At the same time, walking “through its rhythms, rituals, and kinesthetic linking of mind and body with space, and when conscious and deliberate“ can become an activity that is imbued with many types of cultural meaning. This class uses the theme of "walking" and its many forms “strolling, wandering, hiking, demonstrating, marching, pilgrimage, among others“ to explore a conscious way of being and moving in the world.  We will examine the relation of walking to human evolution, health, experiences of cognition and contemplation, place-based knowledge, environmental protection, urban design and wild trail networks, neighborly-ness, the politics of public space, spiritual pilgrimages, the protest marches of social movements, political questions of who has access to move freely through public space (and who doesn't), and more.  Metaphors in our language about walking ("walking in someone else's shoes," "meeting all walks of life," "taking next steps forward"), invite us to compare different voices, traditions, and ways of interacting with the world.  In addition to rigorous intellectual engagement with ideas about walking, another component of the course will engage in acts of walking.  We will therefore attend to a practice of walking consciously and deliberately, both in solitude and in groups, on and off the Bothell campus. As more and more of life becomes sedentary and experienced as a series of interiors, it will be refreshing to get outside, breathe fresh air, and move slowly in rhythm using our lungs and our legs, counteracting the fast, frenetic pace that, increasingly, is modern life.

Undocumented, Unafraid, Unapologetic: Youth Resistance and Social Change
5 credits

Tuesday/Thursday 8:45 AM – 10:45 AM
B CORE 107H, I&S
Instructor: Loren Redwood

This course examines youth activism though a study of the dynamic and growing movement of undocumented youths and a particular focus on immigration reform regarding access to education; specifically through the fight for government support of the Defense, Relief, and Education of Alien Minors Act. This youth resistance organization is known as the DREAMers. These youth have taken a leading role in the debate over immigration reform building on a long history of immigrant resistance and social change. In this course students examine the emergence and growth of the movement in order to investigate the ways in which these young people were able to organize and collaborate while integrating the support of other organizations and gaining their own autonomy.

Zika and other Viral Epidemics
5 credits

Monday/Wednesday 8:45 AM - 10:45 AM
B CORE 107I, I&S or B CORE 110B, NW - Select one only
Instructor: Susan McNabb

Late in 2015, news of a new epidemic caused by the Zika virus started to reach the consciousness of people in the US. Although it had been described decades earlier, something was causing it to spread more widely and swiftly than seen previously. It was particularly devastating when it caused life-threatening microcephaly in the children born to mothers who were infected while pregnant. What is the Zika virus? How is it related to other viruses, and do those relationships offer clues to its effects? How do viral diseases arise, how are they spread, and how do they become epidemics? How do we stop them? We will investigate the nature of biological organisms vs. viruses, viruses as a major cause of infectious human disease, the origins of viruses that have jumped to humans, the involvement of insect vectors, how disease is tracked by the Centers for Disease Control and the World Health Organization, the development of vaccinations and treatments, and why Zika affects brain development in the fetuses of infected mothers.

 

5-Credit Discovery Core NW Options (some cross-listed as B CORE 104, VLPA or B CORE 107, I&S)

 

Understanding the Natural World at the Intersection of Art and Science
5 credits

Monday/Wednesday 8:45 AM - 10:45 AM
B CORE 110A, NW or B CORE 104E, VLPA - Select one only
Instructor: Salwa Al-Noori and Gary Carpenter

This co-taught 5-credit Discovery Core I course introduces students to the intersection of art and science in developing a deeper understanding of the natural world. The sciences and the arts as valuable research tools have propelled discovery and informed each other throughout history. In anatomy and physiology, the intersection of these disciplines provides a more complete understanding of the close correlation of structure and function in biology. From Leonardo da Vinci's depiction of human anatomy and biological processes through observation and the arts, to Santiago Ramon y Cajalâ's pioneering drawings of brain cells in the field of neuroscience, our history is rich in examples that highlight the collaboration and intersection of science and art. Furthermore, the contribution of artistic perspectives to the understanding of biological science necessitates, in turn, an appreciation for the contribution of science as an inspiration for art.

This course examines the relationship of structure (morphology/anatomy) and function (physiology) through a variety of artistic mediums (drawing, painting, sculpting, graphics, etc.) improving observational skills and enhancing critical thinking.  Creativity and innovation help students address natural world explorations into "why our brains are structured the way they are," "why the inside of the kidney looks like it does," "what allows a plant to breathe" and "what the transport system in plants looks like" and many more such questions. Individual and group projects will culminate in an exhibition highlighting the symbiotic relationship between art and science.  This course brings together a scientist and an artist with a mutual appreciation of these disciplines as research methodologies and meets the FYPP Learning Goals of critical and creative inquiry and communication. 

Zika and other Viral Epidemics
5 credits

Monday/Wednesday 8:45 AM - 10:45 AM
B CORE 110B, NW or B CORE 107I, I&S - Select one only
Instructor: Susan McNabb

Late in 2015, news of a new epidemic caused by the Zika virus started to reach the consciousness of people in the US. Although it had been described decades earlier, something was causing it to spread more widely and swiftly than seen previously. It was particularly devastating when it caused life-threatening microcephaly in the children born to mothers who were infected while pregnant. What is the Zika virus? How is it related to other viruses, and do those relationships offer clues to its effects? How do viral diseases arise, how are they spread, and how do they become epidemics? How do we stop them? We will investigate the nature of biological organisms vs. viruses, viruses as a major cause of infectious human disease, the origins of viruses that have jumped to humans, the involvement of insect vectors, how disease is tracked by the Centers for Disease Control and the World Health Organization, the development of vaccinations and treatments, and why Zika affects brain development in the fetuses of infected mothers.

Nutritional Science
5 credits

Tuesday/Thursday 11:00 AM - 1:00 PM
B CORE 110C, NW
Instructor: Grace Lasker

This course introduces key concepts of nutritional science: biochemistry, anatomy and physiology, diet analysis, and scientific principles of investigation. Students will explore components of a healthy diet in the context of health and wellness, self-discovery, research analysis, and current issues.

Farm to Fork (Fa2Fo): Local 2 Global Perspectives
5 credits

Fridays 11:00 AM - 3:15 PM
B CORE 110D, NW or B CORE 107F, I&S - Select one only
Instructors: Annie Bruck and Mo West

Our day-to-day decisions surrounding food have important personal and local to global community consequences. Misinformation and conflicting messages about the quality, safety and health benefits of our food supply are common, making it difficult to know what to eat, as well as where to buy and how best to prepare various foods. In this course we will integrate topics that include understanding select historical and cultural paradigms of food cultivation and consumption; identifying major nutrition problems and guidelines; generating sustainable solutions from individual, local, and global perspectives; and participating in a community food service project.  Fundamental to the journey throughout this course will be advancing students' familiarity with campus resources, the assurance of at least two reflective essay contributions to students' e-portfolio.

 

Area of Knowledge Key:

 

VLPA - Visual, Literary, and Performing Arts
I&S- Individual and Societies
NW- Natural World
W- Writing
C- Composition