School of Science, Technology, Engineering & Mathematics

Faculty

Physical Sciences Full-time Faculty

Anderson

Peter C. Anderson, Ph.D.

Assistant Professor

Office: DISC-352H
Email: pca4@uw.edu

Peter Anderson joined the Physical Sciences Division of the University of Washington-Bothell School of STEM in 2013. He received a B.S. in chemistry and B.A. in French from Pacific Lutheran University in 2001 and received a Ph.D. in Pharmaceutical Sciences from the University of Wisconsin-Madison in 2007. Prior to coming to UW Bothell, he was a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Washington Seattle (2007-2009) and at Sandia National Laboratories in Livermore, CA (2010-2013).

Peter’s research interests focus on computational modeling and design of proteins, peptides, and protein-ligand interactions. His current research projects include: (1) high-throughput virtual screening of compound libraries to identify novel inhibitors of pathogens that cause tropical diseases; (2) molecular dynamics simulations of proteins harboring disease-causing mutations to identify the mutations’ effects on protein structure; (3) molecular dynamics simulations of non-covalent interactions between general anesthetics and ligand-gated ion channels to probe the mechanism of action of general anesthetics; (4) predicting the stability of cellulase enzymes in ionic liquids for applications in overcoming biomass recalcitrance and bioethanol production; and (5) computational de novo design of protein biosensors that recognize and bind to specific small molecules.


Buck

Warren W. Buck, Ph.D.

Chancellor Emeritus; Professor, Science & Technology

Office: DISC-352
Email: wbuck@uw.edu
Website


Daruwala

Khushroo Daruwala, Ph.D.

Senior Lecturer

Office: UWBB-244
Email: daruwala@uw.edu
 


DePies

Matt DePies, Ph.D.

Lecturer

Office: UWHH-1322
Email: mrdepies@uw.edu
Website


Finley

Brandon Finley, Ph.D.

Lecturer and Lab Coordinator

Office: UWHH-1322
Email: bfinley@uw.edu


Galindo

Heather Galindo, Ph.D.

Lecturer

Office: UWHH-1432
Email: hgalindo@uw.edu

Website

Dr. Galindo earned her Ph.D. in Biological Sciences from Stanford University’s Hopkins Marine Station in 2008. Following that she was a Postdoctoral Researcher in the School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences at UW Seattle. Just prior to joining the faculty at UW Bothell, she served for five years as the Assistant Director of Science at a small non-profit organization (COMPASS) that connects environmental scientists with journalists and policymakers.

Dr. Galindo’s research focused on combining techniques from oceanographic modeling, population genetics, and marine ecology to understand how populations of marine animals are connected to each other. She has also studied how people form mental models of scientific concepts and worked to integrate science into public policy processes. At UWB, she aims to make her classroom an inclusive place where students feel respected and challenged while gaining the contexts, knowledge, and skills to both do and communicate science in the modern world.
 


Gunnerson

Kim Gunnerson, Ph.D.

Lecturer

Office: UWHH-1322
Email: gunnek@uw.edu


Hill

Erin Hill, Ph.D.

Lecturer; Director, Quantitative Skills Center;Associate Director, Teaching and Learning Center
Office:  UW2-030C
Email: ehill07@uw.edu

Website

Dr. Hill is an alumna of the University of Washington with a B.S. in physics, and a graduate of the University of California, Irvine where she earned her Ph.D. in physics with a focus on biophysics. Prior to moving into her current positions, she was the Manager of the Quantitative Skills Center (QSC). The QSC not only provides quantitative tutoring to students, but trains undergraduates to become quantitative, peer tutors. Dr. Hill implements faculty development and student workshops with a focus on quantitative reasoning.

Dr. Hill has implemented active learning, evidence-based methods in an introductory physics course, and redesigned the introductory physics lab sequence, to increase students’ conceptual understanding, teamwork skills, critical thinking, and reflection, and to encourage hands-on learning. She is currently assessing these pedagogical approaches. Dr. Hill’s interests are in physics education research, applications of physics to technology, biology, and medicine, and in quantitative literacy across all disciplines.

 


DePies

Charles Jackels, Ph.D.

Professor Emeritus

Office: UWHH-1323
Email: jackels@uw.edu
Website

Dr. Jackels received his Ph.D. in physical chemistry from the University of Washington in 1975.   Prior to coming to UW Bothell in 1995, he was a Postdoctoral Researcher at Battelle Memorial Institute (Columbus, OH) and Professor of Chemistry at Wake Forest University (Winston-Salem, NC). 

His recent research has been part of an international service project in support of small-holder coffee producers in the developing world.  Specifically, he and his collaborators have carried out field- and laboratory studies aimed at improving the quality of Nicaraguan coffee and addressing the “potato taste” defect frequently found in Rwandan coffee.  Prior to the initiation of the coffee research, Dr. Jackels’ work had focused on application of computational quantum chemistry to chemical and physical problems involving small molecules, especially those that are of importance in Earth's atmosphere. 
 


 

Dan-Jaffe.pngDaniel Jaffe, Ph.D.

Chair of Physical Sciences Division; Professor

Office: DISC-452E
Email: djaffe@uw.edu
Website

Dan Jaffe is a Professor of Environmental Chemistry at the University of Washington. He received his B.S. in Chemistry from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and his PhD in Chemistry from the University of Washington. He is expert on atmospheric chemistry, ozone photochemistry, urban and regional smog and long range transport of pollutants and is the author of more than 150 peer-reviewed publications on ozone, aerosols, mercury and other air pollutants. Co-authors on these papers include his graduate students, post-doctoral fellows, and numerous UWB undergraduates. 

Dr. Jaffe is widely recognized as an expert on global transport of pollutants, especially transport from Asia to the U.S. and has several papers on the influence of background sources on regional and urban air quality. He recently participated on the panel for the National Academy of Science’s study on The Significance of Intercontinental Transport of Air Pollutants and was chosen as the Fulbright Distinguished Chair in Environmental Sciences. His research has been funded by the National Science Foundation, NOAA, NASA, EPA and industry partners. Recently he has had several projects funded via “crowd-funding”. Dr. Jaffe’s current projects include studying ozone and particulate matter from global and regional air pollution sources at the Mt. Bachelor Observatory, studying the impacts of wildfires on air quality in the Western U.S. and studying the impacts from diesel powered trains and coal-trains.


 

Daruwala

Joey S. Key, Ph.D.

Assistant Professor

Office
Email

Dr. Key earned her Ph.D. and M.S. in physics at Montana State University in 2010 and 2014, respectively. She completely her undergraduate degree in Astrophysics with highest honors from Williams College. From 2010 to 2013, she worked on the Montana Space Grant Consortium and Montana NASA EPSCoR program as an Education Specialist and Faculty Advisor. Since 2013, she has been a Research Assistant Professor and Director of Education and Outreach at the Center for Gravitational Wave Astronomy, University of Texas Rio Grande Valley.

She works in computational physics as a member of international collaborations to detect gravitational waves, including the NSF Laser Interferometer Gravitational Wave Observatory (LIGO) project. Her research includes astrophysical parameter estimation for gravitational wave signals across the gravitational wave frequency band. She is also dedicated to education research to better understand how to best teach physics and astronomy with diverse student bodies.


 

Charity-Lovitt.png

Charity Lovitt, Ph.D.

Lecturer

Office: UWHH-1323
Email: lovittc@uw.edu

Dr. Lovitt earned her Bachelor’s of Science in Chemistry (Cum Laude, 2003) from Kentucky Wesleyan College and her Ph.D. in Chemistry (2009) from University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Her graduate work spanned many fields, from using computer modeling to understand and predict the outcomes of organometallic reactions to using educational research methods to study the effectiveness of introductory chemistry courses.  She continued her work in computational chemistry Fulbright Fellow to Germany in 2008-2009 and postdoctoral fellow at University of North Texas in 2010.  Prior to UW-Bothell, she taught at Bellevue College and Seattle University.

Dr. Lovitt is a lecturer in the Physical Sciences Division, teaching introductory science courses in chemistry, climate science, and introductory science. Her scholarship emphasis is on fostering engagement in introductory science courses by increasing information literacy and pairing students with community partners. She is a 2015-2016 fellow in Community Based Learning and Research, developing curriculum that engages science students with staff at the Pacific Science Center and Mercer Slough. In addition to teaching, she maintains a small research focus on computer modeling of organometallic reactions and is faculty advisor for the Science and Technology Living Learning community.
 


Finley

Lori Robins, Ph.D.

Assistant Professor

Office: DISC-452
Email: LRobins@uw.edu


Eric-Salathe.jpg

Eric Salathé, Ph.D.

Associate Professor

Office: DISC-352J
Email: salathe@uw.edu
Website

Prof. Salathé earned a Ph.D. in Geology and Geophysics from Yale University and a BA in Physics from Swarthmore College.

He conducts research on regional climate change and the impacts of climate change on human and natural systems. This research supports climate impacts applications in many fields including air quality, hydrology, agriculture, and human health with a focus on the U.S. Pacific Northwest. His current research focuses on how local weather and land-surface processes can affect the regional response to the increased risk of flooding as a result of climate change. His teaching interests include climate science and applied mathematics.


Salathe

David Sommerfeld, Ph.D.

Senior Lecturer

Office: UW2-345
Email: dsommerf@uw.edu


Finley

Muralidhara Thimmaiah, Ph.D.

Senior Lecturer

Office: UWBB-252
Emailmthimmai@uw.edu
 


Physical Sciences Part-time Faculty

binder

Breanna Binder, Ph.D.

Part-time Lecturer

Office: Truly House
Email: bbinder@uw.edu

Website

Dr. Binder received her Ph.D. in astronomy from the University of Washington in 2013. In addition to teaching physics and astronomy at UW Bothell, she is a research associate in the Astronomy Department at UW Seattle.

Her research is on massive binary star evolution, and she specifically uses multiwavelength observations of high mass X-ray binaries to understand their formation, evolution, and the effects they have on the environments of their host galaxies. Dr. Binder’s research utilizes observations from the Hubble Space Telescope and the Chandra X-ray Observatory. She regularly teaches introductory astronomy, physics, and laboratory classes at UW Bothell.
 


Gliboff

Matthew Gliboff, Ph.D.

Part-time Lecturer

Office: Truly House
Email: glib@uw.edu



Subramanian-Ramachandran.jpgSubramanian Ramachandran, Ph.D.

Part-time Lecturer

Office: Truly House
Emailramacs@uw.edu

Dr. Ramachandran received his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Physics from the University of Washington (UW), Seattle in 2007.  He has been teaching at the UW Bothell since 2013. As a visiting lecturer, he has been teaching undergraduate physics courses during the summer quarter in the Department of Physics at the UW Seattle. He is also an adjunct faculty in the Division of Humanities and Sciences at Cornish College of the Arts in Seattle, WA where he teaches a course related to physics in the arts. He has also taught at Seattle University and DeVry University. Prior to his return to an academic setting, he had worked as a Research Scientist at Energy Conversion Devices, Inc in Michigan.  As a Research Scientist, he had worked on materials for renewable energy applications, specifically for hydrogen storage and to harness thermoelectric effect. His research and development activities included designing hydrogen storage systems to be used along with internal combustion engines or fuel cells, and developing renewable hydrogen energy systems based on photovoltaics and water electrolyzers.


His academic research interest covers two aspects –
i. Materials: Study physisorption and chemisorption of hydrogen in materials such as nanotubes and compound alloys. These may employ low temperature measurement techniques and high pressure chemisorption studies.
ii. Systems: Develop a renewable energy system based on hydrogen to assess its technical feasibility with due consideration to hydrogen safety, greenhouse gas mitigation and overall energy efficiency compared to other renewable / non-renewable systems

He is also interested in studying physical phenomena (phases and phase transitions) at cryogenic temperatures and developing thermoelectric material with a higher figure of merit.
 


Smits

Jacqueline Smits, Ph.D.

Part-time Lecturer

Office: Truly House
Emailjsmits@uw.edu


Symon

David Symon, Ph.D.

Part-time Lecturer

Office: Truly House
Emaildasymon@uw.edu

 

Go to the Physical Sciences webpage for more information on Majors and Minors in the physical sciences!