Funded RIGs

2018-2019

Project title: Junior Faculty Peer Support for Interdisciplinary Book Publishing
Name of contact: Shannon Cram
Position/Rank: Assistant Professor
Other RIG members: Adam Romero, Naomi Bragin, Jade Power Sotomayor, Thea Tagle, Christian Anderson, Lauren Berliner

Summary: This research group is organized around support for a form of scholarly research and production—book manuscripts—rather than a thematic inquiry.

Purpose, significance, and objectives: The goal of the group is to facilitate peer and tangible supports for junior faculty pursuing book projects, collectivizing and sharing our experiences and insights from this arduous and complicated process for the support and betterment of all involved. 

RIG relationships and activities will be comprised of: 

1) Ongoing meetings, peer support, and skill sharing for book production from conception, through proposal and manuscript revision, all the way through to publication. Here our activities will consist of regularized meetings and conversations throughout the year, and 

2) Specific collective support for individuals at key moments in their process. This could include things like editing and reading support or advice, or support for specific aspects of the editorial and publishing process (from marketing of projects to presses, to obtaining permissions, etc. etc.) on an as-needed basis.

Funding at the level of $400 per individual member, to be used as they see fit in support of advancing their book projects (to supplement travel for research promotion, for indexing, photograph reproduction, and permissions, etc.) 

I-DISCO funding cannot be used refreshments for the activities described above: if a longer workshop that meets the requirements of food approval is held, this funding can be restored.

Funding awarded: $ 2,800

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Project title: Critical Acts: Socially Engaged Art and Performance
Name of contact: Anida Yoeu Ali
Position/Rank: Artist in Residence
Other RIG members: Jade Power Sotomayor, Naomi Bragin Thea Quiray Tagle, Minda Martin, Jed Murr, Diana Garcia-Snyder

Summary: This is an application to renew our RIG for another year of funding. Our RIG will continue to focus on expanding and deepening socially engaged arts practices at IAS and UWB by providing opportunities for students, colleagues and community members to collaborate across multiple sites with differently located practitioners.

Purpose, significance, and objectives: As scholars, artists, and educators, we are involved in a range of arts-based projects which connect local, national, and international cultural workers to IAS. The RIG works to help us further our individual research and creative practice, to materialize and strengthen the connections among our existing projects, and to build sustainable collaborations between UWB, local artists and performers, and arts institutions

We intend to produce the following outcomes with our RIG: 

  • Hold three quarterly meetings and a three-day retreat at Whiteley Center. 
  • Continue to formalize a plan for an Artist in Residency program and select an artist to participate in on campus 3-day residency as well as one off-campus event featuring the research and/or creative practice of RIG members, alongside or in conversation with regional arts exhibitions and performances. RIG will develop new and strengthen existing partnerships with local and regional artists, educators, and arts venues. We will record audience attendance at each event and build a contact list of artists, scholars, educators and presenters who attend the events from both within and outside UWB.
  • Produce “Alive 3.0 Performance Festival.” The campus-wide festival, scheduled for late Spring 2019, features students’ course-based performance projects and provides students the opportunity to share their work outside of class. Students will have the option to share their performances through an online platform, created to document student and faculty arts collaborations. We will also host the Imagine Performance Showcase. 
  • Initiate, name and develop the online sanctuary platform for sharing work.

Funding awarded: $ 3,000

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Project title: Identity and Pedagogy for Female Scholars of Color
Name of contact: Min Tang
Position/Rank: Lecturer
Other RIG members: Anida Yoeu Ali, Alka Kurian, Mira Shimabukuro

Summary: This RIG aims to bring together women of color in IAS faculty to reflect on how their embodied positionalities and pedagogy transform one another, share experiences and problems faced in the classroom setting due to their minority backgrounds, and discover possible mechanisms of support and intervention in reducing biases against them

Purpose, significance, and objectives: This research interest group aims to: 
- Engage in scholarship on positionality and pedagogy with regard to minority faculty groups 
- Explicate in what ways and to what extent biases exist 
- Explore supporting practices and resources for female scholars of color 
- Expand collaborative network across campus to increase awareness on the issue 

Timetable
Fall 2018: create a list of literatures on identity and pedagogy on minority female faculty(excerpts from the following titles: Presumed Incompetent: The Intersections of Race and Class for Women in Academia, Women Faculty of Color in the White Classroom, Race in the College Classroom: Pedagogy and Politics); discuss challenges faced from past experiences; brainstorm possible intervention methods in reducing biases in classroom and in evaluations; 

Winter 2019: develop workshops and pilot studies in collaborating with TLC and Diversity Center 

Spring 2019: present at annual Teaching and Learning Symposium; arrange a research retreat to the Whiteley Center; plan potential publications. 

Funding awarded: $ 1,500

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Project title: Islamophobia and the Arts
Name of contact: Silvia da Costa Ferreira
Position/Rank: Lecturer
Other RIG members: Anida Yoeu Ali, Maryam S. Griffin

Summary: We are seeking to renew our RIG so that we can deepen the work we began that brings into collaboration the arts, humanities, and social sciences in order to engage our campus community in analyzing and confronting Islamophobia, not just as an issue of individual bias, but as an issue that has structural roots and implications and that intersects with other forms of racism, discrimination, and oppression.

Purpose, significance, and objectives: During the 2018-2019 academic year, we will expand the work we began last year by drawing new voices and perspectives into our local instantiation of a broader national and global conversation about effective strategies for combating Islamophobia. We aim to do this by hosting relevant programming that brings artists, scholars, activists, and community members engaged with issues related to Islamophobia to campus, and by deepening our research capacities on this issue by attending relevant conferences. 

We will use $2000 to bring relevant guests to campus throughout the year (eg, Alma Salem, creator of the Syria Sixth Space Contemporary Art Curatorial Platform; Palestinian artist duo Basel Abbas and Ruanne Abou-Rahme; and/or New York City-based artist, cultural worker, and activist, Yalini Dream) and $1,000 in conference travel funding to enable us to circulate our research in a collaborative context beyond our home institution and to bring back the insights gained in those interactions.

Funding awarded: $ 3,000

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Project title: Art, Culture, and Technology
Name of contact: Carrie Bodle​
Position/Rank: Lecturer
Other RIG members: Abraham Avnisan, Amaranth Borsuk, Ted Hiebert

Summary: The Art, Culture, and Technology RIG brings together faculty from Interdisciplinary Arts, Interactive Media Design, and the MFA in Creative Writing and Poetics curricular areas whose creative practice intersects with emerging technologies and critical discourse in the arts. Building off of our work in the areas of digital arts, experimental practices, and interactive experiences we will exchange insights and best practices from our work in the art, culture, and technology field. We would like to build connections to the broader national and international conversations by participating in an upcoming symposium, Interrupt, hosted by the Seattle Art Museum and Eyebeam Gallery NYC. As part of our involvement we would like to bring artists from the event to our campus and facilitate workshops/talks with faculty and students. This event in the fall will be the catalyst for our continued meetings and engagements for the academic year. 

Purpose, significance, and objectives:
- Participate in the Interrupt event onsite at the Seattle Art Museum’s Olympic Sculpture Park with visiting artists from Eyebeam Gallery NYC and also bring speakers/workshops to UWB from the event 
- Shape faculty dialogue around art, culture, and technology by connecting academic discourse with artistic practice 
- Create visibility for the UWB IA, IMD, and MFA programs and represent our unique approach to socially-engaged interactive art to a national/international community 
- Make connections to community members for future collaborations and engagement with UWB 

Funding awarded: $ 3,000

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Project title: Critical Geographies of Place, Culture, and Cities 
Name of contact: Christian Anderson
Position/Rank: Assistant Professor
Other RIG members: Ben Gardner, Jin-Kyu Jung, and Amir Sheikh

Summary: We pursue several overlapping interests. Broadly speaking, we focus on the intersections among cultural, social, political-economic, and historical-geographical processes in space—especially in an urban context. Alongside pertinent theoretical considerations, we collaboratively integrate different methodological approaches (spanning discourse analysis, ethnography, GIS and Geo-visualization, and other place-based and participatory qualitative methods) to produce innovative research and teaching on these topics. Integral to these ends, we continue to work to identify and pursue opportunities for place-based/community engaged collaborative research in the Seattle metro area and beyond, especially under the broad umbrella of the People’s Geography of Seattle project that has emerged as a direct result of our collaborations to date. 

Purpose, significance, and objectives:
--To begin a theoretically grounded and methodologically diverse discussion of critical urban geographical issues among UWB/IAS faculty with different but overlapping research agendas 
--To locate collaborative methodological intersections between our work 
--To pursue opportunities to leverage both of the above stated goals into innovative, community engaged teaching and research. 

Activities:
1) Seattle Public Library event with community partners, AUTUMN 2018:

2) EXPEDITION SEATTLE Class, Autumn 2018: Christian Anderson will be teaching an elective graduate course in the Master of Arts in Cultural Studies program, which will act as a space of study, workshopping, and researching on the themes that have begun to emerge in the preliminary People’s Geography Conversations.

3) Workshops, Tours, site visits, and consultation with community participants in relation to the above, coordinated with the assistance of program manager Amir Sheikh

4) Digital Archive development: This in particular will be the focus of an upcoming submission for a grant from the Simpson Center, and is one of the main areas of activity we hope to further develop in conversation with our growing network of collaborators over the upcoming year. 

Funding awarded: $ 3,000

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Project title: Expanding the Environmental Humanities
Name of contact: Jennifer Atkinson
Position/Rank: Senior Lecturer
Other RIG members: Shannon Cram, Adam Romero

Summary: This research interest group seeks to advance members’ interests in Environmental Humanities scholarship and teaching, and to explore potential collective work as we develop a new curricular area in EH for our revised Environmental Studies major. At present, RIG members are engaged in separate initiatives but share common interests in promoting understanding and exchange across fields and approaches, engaging our Environmental Studies students in humanistic modes of inquiry, and bringing UWB into conversation with other scholars and institutions working in this interdisciplinary field. The Environmental Humanities RIG is intended to promote exchange around these efforts and explore how they might expand.

Purpose, significance, and objectives: We plan to jointly attend at least two more conferences in 2018-19, continue research on our respective book projects, examine Environmental Humanities models/programs at other institutions, and meet with our three new CRESS colleagues to explore potential collaborations that connect humanities scholarship with their research efforts. Building on our work from 2017-18 (including our collaborations and presentations at the Knowledge/Culture/Ecologies Conference), we are also designing a new core course for the major, "Environment and Humanities," which we will team-teach in spring 2019. 

Funding awarded: $ 3,000

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2017-2018

Project title: Expanding the Environmental Humanities
Name of contact: Jennifer Atkinson
Position/Rank: Lecturer
Other RIG members: Shannon Cram, Adam Romero

Summary: This research interest group seeks to advance members’ interests in Environmental Humanities scholarship and teaching, and to explore potential collective work as we develop a new curricular area in EH for our revised Environmental Studies major.  At present, RIG members are engaged in separate initiatives but share common interests in promoting understanding and exchange across fields and approaches, engaging our Environmental Studies students in humanistic modes of inquiry, and bringing UWB into conversation with other scholars and institutions working in this interdisciplinary field.  The Environmental Humanities RIG is intended to promote exchange around these efforts and explore how they might expand. Our efforts will begin with RIG participants proposing a panel and then presenting our work at the Knowledge/Culture/Ecologies International Conference. That event will then be followed by monthly meetings to explore connected research interests, revise/expand the humanities curricular area in our ES major, and explore Environmental Humanities models/programs at other institutions.

Purpose, significance, and objectives:  The Environmental Humanities RIG is intended to promote exchange around these efforts and explore how they might expand, through participation in the Knowledge/Culture/Ecologies International Conference in Santiago, Chile and monthly meetings  that will explore connected research interests, revise/expand the humanities curricular area in our ES major, and explore Environmental Humanities models/programs at other institutions

Funding awarded: $3,000

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Project title: Exploring and Confronting Islamophobia: Combining Evidence and the Arts
Name of contact: Karam Dana   
Position/Rank: Assistant Professor
Other RIG members: Anida Yoeu Ali, Silvia C. Ferreira/ Lecturer

Summary: Our group will synthesize already existing knowledge that explains Islamophobia and explores new ways to study the phenomena of Islamophobia primarily in the US, and to a lesser extent in Europe. We employ new approaches and methodologies utilizing artistic expressions in our work, through multiple interdisciplinary lens. We approach the issue of Islamophobia through an interdisciplinary social science lens, informed by the humanities and the arts to identify, address, and confront the origins, the progressions, and the consequences of Islamophobia on various local, national, and transnational scenes.

Purpose, significance, and objectives: Planned activities include focus groups with Muslim students, writing/artistic expression retreats at the Whitely Center and conference participation, to support the production of two academic journal articles addressing (1) pedagogical challenges in the classrooms on issues related to Islamophobia and (2) the role of the arts in confronting social and political exclusion, utilizing Islamophobia as a case study.

Funding awarded: $3,000

*     *     *

Project title: Critical Geographies of Place, Culture, and Cities
Name of contact: Christian Anderson
Position/Rank: Assistant Professor
Other RIG member: Ben Gardner, Jin-Kyu Jung, Amir Sheikh

Summary: We will pursue several overlapping interests. Broadly speaking, we will focus on the intersections among cultural, social, political-economic, and historical-geographical processes in space. Alongside pertinent theoretical considerations, we will collaboratively explore how our different methodological approaches (spanning discourse analysis, ethnography, GIS and Geo-visualization, and other qualitative methods) could be integrated to produce innovative research and teaching on these topics. Integral to these ends, we will identify and pursue opportunities for place-based/community engaged collaborative research in the Seattle metro area and beyond.

Purpose, significance, and objectives:

  1. To begin a theoretically grounded and methodologically diverse discussion of critical urban geographical issues among UWB/IAS faculty with different but overlapping research agenda
  2. To locate collaborative methodological intersections between our work
  3. To pursue opportunities to leverage goals A and B into innovative, community engaged teaching and research.

Funding awarded: $3,000

*     *     *

Project title: Journalism Histories and Social Justice in Global Context
Name of contact: Kristin Gustafson
Position/Rank: Lecturer
Other RIG members: Susan Harewood

Summary: This research interest group explores journalism histories in the U.S. and English-speaking Caribbean through the lens of social justice. We are especially interested in global events and activism that engaged certain journalism producers and production, particularly in the years before, during, and after the early 1970s. We share our research and conduct mutual readings that support our interest in identifying particular cultures, activism, and social institutions that have played a role in our case studies of journalism production and related political/social/cultural/community activism. We are also exploring journalism pedagogies and historiography. Our collaboration builds on our shared curriculum affiliations of Media and Communication Studies and Masters of Arts in Cultural Studies, as well as our individual engagement with Global Studies and American and Ethnic Studies curriculum.  Funding supports panel development and travel to conferences. 

Purpose, significance, and objectives: We aim to accomplish three things -- First, synergies between our case studies. The structure of the conference presentation/panel formalizes a way for us to engage this with our scholarly communities. Second, engagement with others in IAS. One of the steps in our process requires us to reach out within IAS. Next year we anticipate refining MCS and MACS curricula

Funding awarded: $ 1500 x 2

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Project title: Critical Acts: Socially Engaged Art and Performance
Name of contact: Anida Yoeu Ali
Position/Rank: Artist is Residence
Other RIG members: Naomi Bragin, Diana Garcia-Snyder, Minda Martin, Jed Murr, Jade Power-Sotomayor, Thea Quiray Tagle

Summary: Our RIG will focus on expanding and deepening socially engaged arts practices at IAS and UWB by providing opportunities for students, colleagues and community members to collaborate across multiple sites with differently located practitioners. As scholars, artists, and educators, we are involved in a range of arts-based projects which connect local, national, and international cultural workers to IAS. The RIG will help us to further our individual research and creative practice, to materialize and strengthen the connections among our existing projects, and to build sustainable collaborations between UWB, local artists and performers, and arts institutions. Our RIG’s objectives not only include connecting with one another as faculty within this research framework but also to enrich campus wide cultural literacy through regular and diverse interfaces with socially engaged art. We will achieve this by activating the UWB community through an annual performance festival, the establishment of an IAS Residency program, and the creation of an online “sanctuary” space.

Purpose, significance, and objectives:

  1. Deepen our collaborative process, develop individual and seed new collaborative work, and plan our annual performance festival.
  2. Create and formalize a plan for an Artist in Residency program and invite artists to participate in on campus 3-day residency; to develop new and strengthen existing partnerships with local and regional artists, educators, and arts venues.
  3. Produce  a second annual campus “Alive: A Performance Festival,”  featuring students’ course-based performance projects.

Conceive an online “sanctuary” space for UWB students, faculty, and community members that will function as a curated platform for socially engaged works of imagination and art, housing works (short films, poetry, performance documentations, photography, etc) by UWB students, faculty and guest artists that specifically address urgent societal issues and provide a forum for critical exchange curated by RIG members. This comes as a response to students who have voiced concerns about the lack of “safe spaces” to exhibit politically charged works responding to urgent contemporary matters.

Funding awarded: $ 3000

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Project title: Contemplative Practice as Pedagogy
Name of contact: Alice Pedersen
Position/Rank: Lecturer
Other RIG members: Kristin Gustafson, Amy Lambert

Summary: This RIG convenes faculty who are interested in integrating contemplative practice into their classroom pedagogies. “Contemplative practice” includes, but is not limited to, silent meditation, guided meditation, somatic movement, forms of self-study, and varying mindfulness practices. Contemplative practice can help to create a healthy work environment, contribute to deepened reflection on the scholarship of teaching and learning, disrupt unhealthy patterns related to work load and anxiety, enrich our conversations with colleagues, and in general help us to become more compassionate instructors. How does introducing these practices into the classroom impact the learning environment? What forms of knowledge, ways of knowing, and encounters with the material might they make possible for students?

We represent a wide spectrum of disciplines, from the humanities to the social sciences to science and art. While it is not our intention to universalize the experience of contemplative practice, we do want to explore how making space for non-rational, embodied experiences can contribute to our teaching and students’ learning in these diverse spaces. We plan to share readings and resources on how to facilitate contemplative practice in the classroom; workshop our own ideas and develop them into lesson plans; implement the lesson plans and debrief them with the group; lead one another in our lessons/practices; and, if possible, begin developing our findings into an article. We would also be happy to share our best practices, or findings, with the wider IAS faculty.

Purpose, significance, and objectives:

  1. Continue to deepen pedagogical practice through course design, mindful and somatic awareness, and reflection on the stakes/challenges of this work
  2. Share our work with a wider community, including IAS faculty
  3. Finish our article and publish (previously developed through the RIG and shared at a national conference)
  4. Develop new workshops and practices

Funding awarded: $ 1850


2016-2017

Project title: Critical Geographies of Place, Culture, and Cities
Name of Contact: Christian Anderson
Position/Rank: Assistant Professor
Other RIG members: Jin-Kyu Jung, Ben Gardner, Lauren Berliner, Dan Berger

Summary: We will pursue several overlapping interests. Broadly speaking, we will focus on the intersections among cultural, social, political-economic, and historical-geographical processes in space. Alongside pertinent theoretical considerations, we will collaboratively explore how our different methodological approaches (spanning discourse analysis, ethnography, GIS and Geo-visualization, and other qualitative methods) could be integrated to produce innovative research and teaching on these topics. Integral to these ends, we will identify and pursue opportunities for place-based/community engaged collaborative research in the Seattle metro area and beyond. We will also act as an incubator for the elements of and connections between the Lake City Collaboratory and Beyond the Carceral State initiative.

One explicit activity this RIG would like to sponsor would be a conversation on Critical Geography and the Carceral State in February with Rashad Shabazz from Arizona State (who will already be in town) and Tamara Spira from Western Washington University (Dan Berger is helping organize/fund this on other fronts as well).

Funding awarded: $1000

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Project title: Rethinking Economies
Name of Contact: S. Charusheela
Position/Rank: Associate Professor
Other RIG members: Susan Harewood, Christian Anderson

Summary: The Rethinking Economies RIG aims to constitute a ‘research institute’ at IAS.  The idea for this RIG began as part of the redesign of the MACS degree to promote more integration of community engagement, research, and scholarly activity within the program.  While the RIG has its origins in curricular redesign, our purpose is to not only facilitate connections between our research and teaching, but also to promote spaces for collaboration in our research, by coordinating community and global education elements into our course work and scholarship. 

Group aims for this year are:

  • To cultivate and develop the Lake City Collaboratory;
  • To work on cultivating transnational links for graduate scholarship.  One aim for the coming year (or two) will be to set up options for course collaboration between graduate students at IAS and graduate programs at the University of the West Indies, Universities of KwaZulu-Natal and Cape Town, and University of Western Sydney;
  • To work on constituting some community oriented/public scholarship oriented elements for our courses reflecting the development of approaches to rethinking economies. 

This RIG aims to be able to unveil at least one graduate elective in 2016-2017 that has the elements of public scholarship and/or transnational collaboration with other universities.

Funding awarded:  $1000

*     *     *

Project title: Hybrid Epistemologies of Socio-Environmental Change
Name of Contact: Santiago Lopez
Position/Rank: Assistant Professor
Other RIG members: Jin-Kyu Jung; Felipe Murtinho, Assistant Professor, Seattle University

Summary: In this RIG, we will pursue several overlapping interests.  We will focus on the challenges and opportunities of applying a hybrid epistemological framework in environmental change research. We will specifically explore ways on how to integrate mixed-methods approaches in socio-environmental research (grounded theory, ethnography, qualitative and quantitative spatial analysis and geovisualization, spatial econometrics, remote sensing, GIS) to produce innovative work in topics related to the human dimensions of global change.  To these ends, we will build on ongoing research activities in South America and pursue new opportunities to engage in collaborative community-based research locally and internationally.

RIG goals will be:

  • To expand our collaborative network and identify intersections between our different types of work.
  • To engage in applied research that combines qualitative and quantitative methods to advance the understanding of global environmental change.
  • To enable the completion of ongoing research in South America and pursue new collaborative opportunities to engage in innovative and community-based research and teaching.

The expected outcomes of this RIG are multiple. First, we will produce materials (maps, reports, and audiovisuals) that will be used in future academic presentations and publications and that will be shared with the communities we worked in the summer of 2015. Second, we will publish at least two articles from this RIG next calendar year based on the material we will generate and data that we are currently processing.  Third, we will develop and share teaching materials for curriculum development promoting hybrid methods.   Fourth, we will expand and enhance our collaboration network with local researchers from the Seattle area who also work in the Andean region and have overlapping interests.

The success of this RIG will be evaluated based on number and quality of publications, reports, maps, teaching materials, and future research proposals that will be generated throughout the year.

Funding awarded: $3000

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Project title: Identifying Overlaps in Research Questions for Teaching Science, Art, and STS
Name of Contact: Becca Price
Position/Rank: Associate Professor
Other RIG members: Tyler Fox, Amy Lambert

Summary: This RIG has two goals: (1) to identify overlaps in how IAS faculty approach teaching life sciences, arts practice, and STS, and (2) to, if possible, generate a grant proposal to NSF about developing and assessing modules for using science-arts to teach students about the connections between science and society. IAS—and UWB more generally—have a number of faculty who teach in these areas, but we have not had the chance to carve out space to share our ideas. Moreover, true to our interdisciplinary vision, we often have formal training in only one of these areas.

The time is ripe for these conversations within the biology education research community, as well. The Vision and Change Report (AAAS, 2011) highlights biology and society as one of six core competencies. Specifically, the Report states that every biology students should “Have the ability to understand the relationship between science and society” and that “biology is conducted in a social context.” While the other five competencies have generated lots of research within the biology education community about how best to teach them, the competency around biology and society remains largely untouched. Perhaps this gap exists because biologists lack training in STS. The unique combination of life scientists, STS scholars, and science artists in IAS (and at UWB more generally) make this a great place to identify strategies for filling this gap. Eventually we would like to submit a grant proposal to NSF, but it is currently unclear whether this is achievable within a year.

The core members will meet monthly and, possibly, biweekly once we begin to write the grant proposal. We will refine ideas generated at weekly and quarterly meetings to identify the areas of overlap that the RIG identifies. In the initial stages, the bulk of the work will be done at meetings. However, once grant writing begins, we recognize that the core members will need to present deliverable products at each meeting.

Funding awarded: $1500

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Project title: Advancing SoTL
Name of Contact: Linda Watts
Position/Rank: Professor
Other RIG members: not named

Summary: This spring 2016 RIG will support the efforts of IAS faculty members seeking intellectual community around specific projects contemplated or underway in the scholarship of teaching and learning.  It proposes to:

  1. provide ongoing structure and support for faculty exploration of SoTL
  2. promote best practices in SoTL at UWB
  3. encourage dissemination of instructional innovations and insights, both at and beyond UWB

The RIG responds to the expressed needs of participants in two currently active faculty learning communities (Reflective Practice FLC and CBLR Fellows Program) for mentoring, peer guidance, and ongoing support for projects (especially first forays) into SoTL. Participation is not limited to these groups, but will likely bring together IAS faculty members of both groups with IAS faculty who have not been a part of those two specific ventures.

During Spring quarter 2016, 4-8 participants will meet every other week for 60-90 minute discussions. Each session will combine multiple elements: guidance in best practices of SoTL, touch-base conversations about works-in-progress, and targeted discussions/feedback on individual participant's projects.   Funding is set aside for production for 'Advancing SoTL' participants to produce and present poster sessions on work at conferences and symposia if claimed by June 2016.

Budget granted: $1000

*     *     *

Project title: Contemplative Practice as Pedagogy
Name of Contact: Alice Pedersen
Position/Rank: Lecturer Full-Time (IAS)
Other RIG members: Kristin Gustafson Amy Lambert

Summary: This RIG convenes faculty who are interested in integrating contemplative practice into their classroom pedagogies. “Contemplative practice” includes, but is not limited to, silent meditation, guided meditation, somatic movement, forms of self-study, and varying mindfulness practices. As a group, we bring many years of collective contemplative practice to the table, and have seen how it enriches our own lives. For example, contemplative practice can help to create a healthy work environment, contribute to deepened reflection on the scholarship of teaching and learning, disrupt unhealthy patterns related to work load and anxiety, enrich our conversations with colleagues, and in general help us to become more compassionate instructors. We are curious, therefore, how introducing these practices into the classroom will impact the learning environment, and what forms of knowledge, ways of knowing, and encounters with the material they might make possible for students. We represent a wide spectrum of disciplines, from the humanities to the social sciences to science and art. While it is not our intention to universalize the experience of contemplative practice, we do want to explore how making space for non-rational, embodied experiences can contribute to our teaching and students’ learning in these diverse spaces.

During the course of this RIG, we plan to share readings and resources on how to facilitate contemplative practice in the classroom; workshop our own ideas and develop them into lesson plans; implement the lesson plans and debrief them with the group; lead one another in our lessons/practices; and, if possible, begin developing our findings into an article. We would also be happy to share our best practices, or findings, with the wider IAS faculty.

Activities:

Fall: create bibliography of resources; initial meeting to discuss our own practices and goals for introducing contemplative practice in the classroom

Winter: workshop and develop lesson plans; implement lesson plans; debrief

Spring: retreat to Whiteley Center: each participant will lead the group in a practice that they use in class, and explain how it supports the Learning Objectives of the course. Debrief on the stakes, obstacles, and issues that come up from using these practices in the academic classroom. Discussion of next steps as a RIG, including potential publication.

This proposed RIG is the extension of a TLC started in Fall 2016. One of our primary aims is to solidify our work together, heighten its visibility on campus, and thereby be able to offer these practices and insights to the wider community from a place of support and collaboration.

Budget granted: $1000

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Project title: Urban Gardens
Name of Contact: Martha Groom
Position/Rank: Professor
Other RIG members: Christian Anderson, Jennifer Atkinson, Jin-Kyu Jung, Amy Lambert, Lauren Lichty, Santiago Lopez, Rebeca Rivera, Adam Romero

Summary: This research interest group seeks to support members’ individual interests in urban agriculture and to explore potential collective work.  At present, RIG members are engaged in separate initiatives.  They share common interests in enhancing curricula in ways that help engage students in food system research on campus and near campus community gardens and working farms.  The Urban Gardens RIG is intended to promote exchange around these efforts and explore they might fruitfully be grown. Monthly meetings (rotating among community gardens/farms; at the site of the future UWB Campus Garden, etc) will discuss connected research interests and promote greater knowledge of local opportunities.

Funding will support group travel to local garden/farm sites in the region (using UW vehicles), pilot projects that could help support larger funding requests, and regional speakers for a colloquium series.

We will consider the project successful if we have a stronger plan for both research and teaching about urban gardens/agriculture/food systems, with our efforts better mapped across our curricula, and individual or collective efforts advanced to new stages.

Budget granted: $1500

*     *     *

Project title: Investigating Racial Disparities in Health
Name of Contact: Shauna Carlisle
Position/Rank: Assistant Professor
Other RIG members: Andrea Stone (Assistant Professor, NHS), Geetha Thamalirasu (Assistant Professor, STEM/CSS)

Summary: The purpose of this research group is to examine social and racial inequalities that result in health disparities. We will examine the social context and social predictors of poor health across multiple chronic health indicators and across a diverse group of foreign- and native-born respondents. A key focus of this group is to examine the relationship between perceived and actual racial/ethnic discrimination and health.  We will launch two studies 3-4 months apart.  The first is an adolescent health study for which we are seeking IRB approval, and a second the Black women's health study for which we have just received IRB approval.

This truly interdisciplinary research interest group has drawn on the expertise and interests of each member in its project design and development.  Geetha Thamilarasu (and her undergraduate student) have contributed to the development of a health information AP that will assist in collecting health related qualitative data from participants.  Shauna Carlisle and Andrea Stone have developed the survey instruments, research design, and have recruited a team of 5 undergraduate students to work on both research projects.  We intended to launch and complete data collections for both pilot studies and use the findings to write or resubmit grant proposals for a larger study, according to the timeline below.  We anticipate that each investigator will have one first authored publication in draft form by the end of the RIG.

Budget granted: $3000