Global Initiatives

Intercultural Education Bibliography

Compiled by Aaron Huston, Class of 2013. Links are accessible with UW NetID.

Amosa, Wendy and Paul C. Gorski. “Directions and Mis-Directions in Multicultural Education: An Analysis of Session Offerings at the Annual Conference of the National Association for Multicultural Education. Personal Perspective 10.3 1 July 2008: 167-174. 21 May 2012

This is a study about how the professors in higher education feel about the presence of having international students in their classrooms.  Many of them said it provided and was a benefit to their education about other cultures, which broadens their minds.  Sometimes professors would change their teaching habits to accommodate the international students though which was a challenge for some because they had to find an effective way of addressing language barriers.  The attitude of intercultural integration and the differences between cultures is modeled through six stages: denial, defence, minimization, acceptance, adaptation, and integration.  The study in this paper was a survey given to the staff at a university in Australia to see what their views towards their methods of instruction were and their view towards international students.

Baker, Trish and Jill Clark. “Intercultural Education.Cooperative Learning – A Double‐Edged Sword: A Cooperative Learning Model for use with Diverse Student Groups 21.3 16 Aug. 2010: 257-268. 3 Apr. 2012

This article is about the benefits and challenges of cooperative learning (CL) with ethnically and linguistically diverse classes.  It can be seen as a sword by if CL is done correctly; it will be useful and beneficial for the group.  If it is not, it will be ineffective and disastrous. Researchers have concluded that students who learn in groups develop increased intercultural understanding, improved interpersonal skills, and that they are better prepared for the modern participative workplace or as essential preparation for participating in a democratic society.  This is a study about how professors can understand the challenges of CL so they can be more pedagogically sound and culturally accommodating for international students.

Banks, James A. “Multicultural Education: For Freedom’s Sake.Educational Leadership 49.4 1 Dec. 1991: 32-36. 21 May 2012

Banks writes about how education in a diverse society helps students understand community cultures and how to gain the required knowledge to strive in an equitable and just society.   Western traditionalists hold the power in education and curriculum mainly teaching American history and a one-sided story of other cultures that doesn’t depict the correct reality.  It is predicted that in 2020 half of the American citizens will be of color so suppressed voices, opinions, and perspectives will need to share the power that education holds.  Classrooms and society should be more democratic to openly discuss worldly issues and it would be achieved in a respectable, non-judgmental society.

Erlenawati, Sawir. “Dealing with Diversity in Internationalized Higher Education Institutions.Intercultural Education 22.5 15 Dec. 2011: 381-394. 3 Apr. 2012

This is a study about how the professors in higher education feel about the presence of having international students in their classrooms.  Many of them said it provided and was a benefit to their education about other cultures, which broadens their minds.  Sometimes professors would change their teaching habits to accommodate the international students though which was a challenge for some because they had to find an effective way of addressing language barriers.  The attitude of intercultural integration and the differences between cultures is modeled through six stages: denial, defence, minimization, acceptance, adaptation, and integration.  The study in this paper was a survey given to the staff at a university in Australia to see what their views towards their methods of instruction were and their view towards international students.

Gay, Geneva Dr. and Mary M.Atwater. “Multicultural Education for All Disciplines.” (n.d.): 160-162

This article is from a phone interview from Dr. Geneva Gay who is currently a professor at University of Washington, Seattle, in the College of Education’s Department of Curriculum and Instruction and she openly discusses incorporating multicultural education and cultural diversity in science classrooms.  She offers her advice of what teachers should do if they want to implement cultural aspects into the curriculum and she says that teachers need to try to discuss relevant things for different cultural orientations that is meaningful to them.  Having multicultural education constructs a family which is very exciting to be a part of and is inviting as well.

Johnson, Judith. “SPARCS Ignites Multicultural Education.Educational Leadership 51.8 1 May 1994: 36-39. 22 May 2012

Solving Problems and Revitalizing Curriculum in Science (SPARCS) is a program used in schools that teachers use to draw students to be interested in learning about science.  Students shouldn’t have to learn and memorize material through the curriculum, but they should want to learn it to pursue their own interests and to focus learning around the community so it can be incorporated into real life.  SPARCS changes the methods of teaching so students can ask more questions rather than following a schedule.  When questions are asked, students can critique each other and have critical thinking which engages more students in open, respectful discussions that also hold value in diversity.

Luciak, Mikael. Educating Teachers for Diversity: Meeting the Challenge. N.p.: Paris: OECD, ©2010, 2010. 3 Apr. 2012

This book encyclopedia is about education in general and having diversity involved into the curriculum.  Having diversity and having minorities in the school system can bring unfairness, racism, and labeling, but there are benefits to having a diverse classroom and learning about someone else’s culture during lecture or having it be a part of the lecture.  It’s good to learn about your own history, but it’s better to learn about someone else’s so you can learn about how other people have been oppressed.  Being different brings people closer.  It lessons racism, brings closeness, educates students, and you can learn more from someone else and value each other better since there is a different mindset and belief.  Social interaction can bring social change and change the way of how one sees the world.

Ortiz De Montellano, Bernard R. “Multicultural Science: Who Benefits?Science Education 85.1 5 Dec. 2000:  N. pag. 23 May 2012

This article questions what we should be teaching in elementary schools because the curriculum taught is supposed to prepare children to be successful in the work place.  Science needs to be culturally relevant to the students and not false, counterproductive information being taught.  Western modern science has many different methods and topics so there is never a necessary and sufficient way to conduct science, but a practical approach to a school’s curriculum is needed.  Scientific knowledge for multiculturalists is sometimes ignored and western modern science takes over the curriculum.  For students to get the maximum potential from education, information needs to be scientifically and anthropologically correct with valid evidence and examples from intercultural backgrounds and history.

Sidanius, James and Peter Schmidt. “The Mixed Benefits of Diversity.” The Chronicle of Higher Education 54.25 (27 Feb. 2009): 4.

This is an email interview between The Chronicle of Higher Education and James Sidanius, a professor of psychology and of African and African-American studies at Harvard University.  Professor Sidanius did a research study on cultural diversity and multicultural practices at UCLA and his findings suggest that there were neither a positive or negative effect on students’ ethnic identities or cause of ethnic conflict or separation on campus.  Yet, the study shows benefits of the cultural diversity on campus by students having less politically conservative, ethnocentric, and racist views and there were also increased intergroup interaction.  The negative effects were with student organizations like in fraternities and sororities, for example, there were high levels of ethnic identities in one group that lead other students of similar ethnic backgrounds join.  Student organizations like these are open for all ethnic groups to join, but one group tends to join groups of the same race so it eliminated interethnic interaction.

Todd, Sharon. “Educating Beyond Cultural Diversity: Redrawing the Boundaries of a Democratic Plurality.Studies in Philosophy & Education 30.2 9 Dec. 2010: 101-111. 3 Apr. 2012

This article is about how merging individuals together from different cultural backgrounds reduces conflict and tension.  It’s like an intervention for solving problems if there is a bad perspective towards another culture or race.  When people from different cultures work together, they learn about competing worldviews, beliefs, and knowledge.  The intended solution would be that these different cultural backgrounds would live in harmony with one another.  Intercultural education is a necessary tool to solve issues of democracy.  Individuals can learn from one another and the personal encounters will be meaningful far beyond the expectations of simply tolerating diversity.