Spring 2014 Discovery Core III

BCUSP 118 A - DISC CORE III: (I&S)
10812 Monday / Wednesday 1:15 - 3:15 Richardson, Pete

CULTURES OF THE NORTHWEST (5 credits)

This class will explore the Pacific Northwest and provide a short introduction to cultural anthropology by looking at how peoples of the region have experienced and defined wildness as an aspect of nature, but also as an aspect of the human, both sacred and feared. You will learn about Northwest cultures – such as the whalers working the Bering Sea millennia ago, timberworkers of the early twentieth century, and the global influences of Northwest rock and roll – while also investigating the central role of wildness to our understandings of nature and culture, both within us and without.

BCUSP 118 B - DISC CORE III: (I&S)
10813 Tuesday / Thursday 11:00 - 1:00 Redwood, Loren

AT HOME & ABROAD: TRAVEL NARRATIVES & REFLECTIVE WRITING (5 credits)

This course will use autobiographic texts written in the form of travel narratives in order to examine the process of reflection. The course will provide multiple opportunities for students to examine methods and practices of reflection as they prepare to reflect upon their own writing, progress, and complete the required capstone project for the year. Examining travel narratives from multiple sources allows students to gain insight into the authors who are reflecting on their professions, social relationships, and the time in which they lived; while making connections between these aspects of their lives.

BCUSP 118 C - DISC CORE III: (I&S)
10814 Monday / Wednesday 1:15 - 3:15 Ambikar, Rucha

INFORMATION, TECHNOLOGY, AND DEVELOPMENT (5 credits)

This course aims to explore the relationship between information, technology and society, particularly computer based information technologies and the ways in which it affects economic and social development in the world. We focus on the relationship between such technology and development in poorer countries in the world.         

The rise of information and communication technology (ICT) in the western industrialized nations has been accompanied by a more democratic and easier access to information, allowing people to participate more fully in decisions pertaining to their own development. The apparent benefits of this new information technology also raised concerns among policy makers about the so-called “digital divide”; i.e. the gap between people with access to information and communication technologies and those without.

In this course we analyze the effects of a global emphasis on ICT and the effects of such a policy in terms of development. We explore the role of information and communication technology in socio-economic development in the world and analyze this phenomenon at the local, state, national and international level. While we focus on the macro-changes in policy during this course, we undertake an analysis of numerous case-studies in order to illustrate the network of changes effected through the introduction of ICT.

BCUSP 118 D - DISC CORE III: (I&S)
10815 Monday / Wednesday 11:00 - 1:00 Nixon, David

ETHICS, RELIGION, AND THE MEANING OF LIFE (5 credits)

The core concept we'll cover is: What Is The Meaning Of Life? In other words: What aspects make one life a more worthwhile, well-lived, meaningful life than another? And conversely: what aspects would tend to make a life more likely to be a meaningless, pointless, waste of a life? We'll consider various traditional Western philosophical perspectives, and a few eastern religious perspectives.

BCUSP 118 E - DISC CORE III: (I&S)
10816 Monday / Wednesday 8:45 - 10:45 Kae, Julie

DOCUMENTATION AND THE POLITICS OF KNOWLEDGE (5 credits)

This course will be a philosophical, historical and cultural inquiry into the 'document,' a simultaneously mundane and political object of knowledge. We will begin with a discussion of the document in relation to establishment of disciplinary society. We will examine different examples of the document: N-400, application for naturalization, the U.S. citizenship application, photographs of the 1930's Dust Bowl by the Farm Security Administration, recorded oral histories by 1960's civil rights activists, and a documentary film, to ask: what makes these text 'documents'? How does reading these texts as 'documents' affect our attitudes towards their social currency? In what ways do these text support, challenge or transform how we understand official and unofficial forms of knowledge? As we explore these examples of documentation and read supporting texts, we will discuss how we attribute truth and value to these forms of knowledge. We will consider how our lives are structured by documents and how these questions apply to the production of the CUSP portfolio, a document of your intellectual history as a first year student at UW-Bothell.

BCUSP 118 F - DISC CORE III: (I&S)
10817 Tuesday / Thursday 1:15 - 3:15 Sands, Travis

CITIZENSHIP AND THE UNIVERSITY (5 credits)

What is a nation? Who counts as a citizen and who gets discounted? How do the forms and practice of national and communal belonging inform our understandings of identity? In this course we will take up these and other questions as we work to complete your first-year Discovery Core portfolio. A range of recent laws, films, novels and academic studies will offer us points of entry for thinking about the multiple forms citizenship takes in the contemporary United States. Given that the university has been and remains an important institution for both the production and contestation of citizenship and its norms in the U.S., we will collaboratively reflect on the extent to which your studies have positioned you as a “citizen� of the classroom, the university, the nation, and the globe, and we will use the portfolio as an opportunity to critically engage with this positioning. We will conclude this course with a "conference" in which each of you will present original research that explores a question related to citizenship, and that is oriented to your academic and personal goals in the years to come.

BCUSP 118 G - DISC CORE III: (I&S)
10818 Tuesday / Thursday 8:45 - 10:45 Oppenheimer, Robin

AUTOBIOGRAPHY AND MEDIA STORYTELLING (5 credits)

This course explores the cultural and technological issues, ideas, and creative practices around diverse media forms of autobiography found in experimental film, video art, documentary, and, more recently, social media platforms such as YouTube and Facebook. Works by media artists are viewed and analyzed to reveal a wide range of styles and approaches to telling a person’s life story through digital images, sounds, and texts. Students will study literary and media autobiography theorists as they learn to create a short video for their portfolios based on a personal story. They will integrate their CUSP writings and autobiographical creations into a final class presentation and their DCIII e-portfolio.

BCUSP 118 H - DISC CORE III: (I&S)
10819 Tuesday / Thursday 11:00 - 1:00 Gustafson, Kristin

JOURNALISTIC INTERVIEWING - CRITICAL AND CREATIVE INQUIRY (5 credits)

By conducting journalistic interviews, designing a first-year learning portfolio (which includes critically reflecting on three artifacts of learning), and critically reading and responding to popular and scholarly writing, students who take this course will draw connections between their own experiences and notions of civic/amateur/alternative journalism and public scholarship. Critical reflection on one's self, one's ideas, and one's work, all crucial for deep learning and engaged scholarship, will serve as a foundation for the course. Students will engage with the dialogue, interpretation, reporting, and aesthetics of journalistic interviewing in order to investigate and make sense of their first year of learning at UW Bothell. Articulating a notion of public scholarship or public intellectualism vis-a-vis their own experiences and work will frame their perspective on their future undergraduate studies. Students will have the opportunity to practice communication skills including critical reading; media literacy; and written, visual, online, and oral presentation.

BCUSP 119 A - DISC CORE III: (NW)
10820 Monday / Wednesday 8:45 - 10:45 Brockhaus, Andreas

HACK THE CLASSROOM! LEARNING IN THE DIGITAL WORLD (5 credits)

Technology is having a radical effect on teaching and learning. From MOOCs to flipped classrooms, YouTube to eTextbooks, active learning classrooms to social networks, technology is impacting education and educational institutes. So what is the learner’s role in this evolving and hyper-connected digital world? What impact is technology having on how, where and how well students learn? How is technology changing higher education?

In this course we’ll examine definitions and theories of learning and look at how technology is shifting educational expectations and delivery modes. We’ll also study how the concept of a learner is changing and what impact that’s having on the student and on society in general. We’ll examine the disruptive effect of technology on universities and other educational institutions and consider the various perspectives on how technology will affect the future of learning. We’ll also raise questions about the effectiveness of various modes of learning with technology and examine differing arguments on how technology is helping or hindering effective learning.

This course will be offered as a hybrid course so that students will have additional opportunities to experiment and analyze various online learning modalities. A consideration of eportfolios will evolve naturally out of course activities as an example of digital learning, and we will use eportfolios as a practical example for class discussions on how to effectively use technology in learning.

BCUSP 119 A - DISC CORE III: (NW)
10821 Tuesday / Thursday 11:00 - 1:00 Schinneman, Avery

CLIMATE CHANGE IS HISTORY (5 credits)

Modern debates on implementation of climate policy and the rigor of climate science are common media topics, but they haven’t always been part of the social and political landscape. Although the “greenhouse effect” and the dynamic nature of Earth’s climate were recognized almost 200 years ago and the first calculations of anthropogenic contributions to greenhouse gasses were published before the turn of the 20th century, the discussion of “climate change” in the public arena began in the 1970s, becoming widespread only 20 years ago. These scientific discoveries and debates have evolved over two centuries; to fully appreciate the subject and understand it’s complexity, a complete history is needed, including all the players — mathematicians and biologists, lab technicians and bureaucrats, industrialists and politicians, reporters and citizens. We will learn about the main players in early climate science, including the contributions of mathematician and physicist Joseph Fourier (1768-1830), physical chemist Svante Arrhenius (1859-1927), oceanographer Charles Keeling (1928-2005), and modern scientists, economists, and politicians who are shaping the way we understand and respond to climate change today. As we reconstruct the development of climate science from the first discoveries to the threshold of modern science, we will learn who asked the first questions about climate, and why? We will ask what assumptions about climate have changed in the past 200 years, and what discoveries led to those changes? We will investigate the science as it is understood today, using practical exercises and case studies to better understand climate research and we will read and compare media accounts of climate science from the 1930s, 1970s and today, striving to understand the events that brought climate science into the public sphere.

BCUSP 119 B - DISC CORE III: (NW)
10822 Tuesday / Thursday 3:30 - 5:30 Finley, Brandon

CHEMISTRY IN THE COSMOS (5 credits)

This course will continue promoting the objectives of the Discovery Core series: interdisciplinary learning, research and communication, and active reflection on your experiences. We will pursue these objectives through the lens of astronomy and a study of the cosmos. We will explore the big topics of the universe - light, space, and time. We'll also discuss the birth and death of stars, planets, and galaxies. We'll look at recent successes and failures in our exploration of space and use these as a way to study our own successes and failures and determine how best to move forward. All of our topics will be tied to the personal reflection that you will demonstrate in the portfolio project.

BCUSP 119 C - DISC CORE III: (NW)
10823 Monday / Wednesday 3:30 - 5:30 Anderson, Laurie

LEARNING FROM NATURE IN THE CITY (5 credits)

BCUSP 119C Learning from Nature in the City: Through a series of exercises and homework, in-class videos, discussions, and readings, students will gain new and varied perspectives about themselves in relationship with nature. Nature will be examined as manicured settings, as landscapes with wild edges, at its worst (e.g., water runoff, waste treatment plants, hurricanes, floods), in preconceived settings (e.g., zoo, aquarium), and as a practice for life (e.g., sustainability, wilderness preserves, parks). The primary goal is for students to re-identify with nature. In conjunction with this work, students will be led in various exercises through reflective introspection and faculty assessment to help them assess and complete their final Student Portfolio.

BCUSP 120 A - DISC CORE III: (VLPA)
10824 Friday 11:00 - 3:15 Kurian, Alka

SOUTH ASIAN CINEMAS (5 credits)

South Asian Cinemas: In this course students will assemble and finalize their E-Portfolios illustrating their reflection on and revision of the work they will have done during the first year of their college and in their extracurricular activities. The course will be divided between work on the E-portfolio (30%) and an investigation of South Asian cinema (70%) as their themed course, which constitutes the culmination of the three interlinked DC courses on film studies. Here we will examine some of the significant trends, films, and filmmakers of Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Nepal, India, Pakistan, and Sri Lanka. We will begin by studying early cinema in South Asia and go on to investigating the different genres such as historical, social, art, diasporic, short, and documentary through an examination of certain key moments of its development during the 20th and 21st centuries. Students will also explore how film has been used as a medium to represent the history and contemporary realities of the region such as the anti-colonial movement, decolonization, various movements of partition and secessionism, the communist rebellion, terrorism, neocolonialism, right-wing fundamentalism, Bollywood, and the NRI cinema.

BCUSP 120 B - DISC CORE III: (VLPA)
10825 Tuesday / Thursday 8:45 - 10:45 Courtmanch, Randi

COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT THROUGH THE ARTS (5 credits)

This course will look at how artists, collectives and organizations work within community settings to produce and create art. Through readings, discussions, experiential activities, and artist screenings we will explore how the practice and process of art can be used to generate dialogue, knowledge, and work across difference. We will utilize this learning by looking at our own community within UWB and creating group projects that address specific needs, spaces, and/or communities within the campus. Come prepared to collaborate and share in a generative process of learning and exploration.

Additionally, we will take this dynamic learning and turn inward to the work and knowledge students have built over their freshman year. Students will build connections between their academic work, extracurricular activities, and their future goals to develop a comprehensive portfolio and reflective essay of their first year at UWB. This will be done through peer feedback, experiential activities, and the development of short reflective essays.

BCUSP 120 C - DISC CORE III: (VLPA)
10826 Monday / Wednesday 3:30 - 5:30 Doyle, Gavin

SONNETS, SEX, POWER: SHAKESPEARE ON CAMPUS (5 credits)

This class asks students to explore the themes of Shakespeare and to connect them to their own lives on campus. We begin with an exploration of the Bard’s sonnets and conclude with the creation of a book of Shakespearian-styled sonnets written by and about our class. Our creative efforts are balanced by analysis, discussion, and reading of two of his works—Much Ado About Nothing and Macbeth. Students can expect to write creatively, engage in class discussions and readings, perform a Shakespearian monologue or scene, and produce reflective papers on their work and studies.

BCUSP 120 D - DISC CORE III: (VLPA)
10827 Monday / Wednesday 1:15 - 3:15 Hsu, Howard

PICTURE YOURSELF: PHOTOGRAPHY AS PERSONAL EXPRESSION (5 credits)

This course examines photography as means of personal expression. It has been said, “every photograph taken is a self-portrait." Each photograph is in some way, shape, or form an insight into the photographer's mind. The course will encourage students to look introspectively at their past, present, and future and incorporate aspects of themselves into their photography.

Students will develop technical photographic skills, learn about contemporary photographers, and explore personal identity, cultural perspectives, and ideological views of the world.

BCUSP 120 E - DISC CORE III: Media in Everyday Life: Aesthetic and Cultural Approaches (VLPA)
10828 Friday 8:45 - 1:00 Porter, Ian

Media in Everyday Life: Aesthetic and Cultural Approaches (5 credits)

THIS COURSE IS 25% HYBRID, meaning that CLASS WILL START AT 10 AM everyday, instead of at 8:45 AM.

The plural of ‘medium,’ the term ‘media’ signifies the various means, materials, and milieux of human expression and action. In his book Understanding Media, Marshall McLuhan counts clocks, railroads, electric light, and bicycles alongside radio, film, and television as forms of media. If all of these things are media, what makes a medium a medium? What are the formal and cultural characteristics of a medium? More to the point, why is mediation seemingly so important in our everyday lives? In this class, we will answer these questions by reflecting on and interpreting media in everyday life, and we will also produce media to respond to everyday life. At its core, this class is about the critical and creative endeavor of interpretation. By interpreting media in everyday life, students will develop strategies to interpret their own first-year experiences as they produce the culminating CUSP Student Portfolio. As the keystone of the Discovery Core sequence, the CUSP Student Portfolio provides an opportunity for students to reflect on their first year experiences in order to better understand their own development and their goals for the future. In addition to the portfolio assignment, students will engage a variety of media theories and artifacts to develop their critical skills. Students will produce at least one media artifact, though no prior media production experience is expected.

BCUSP 120 F - DISC CORE III: (VLPA)
10829 Monday / Wednesday 11:00 - 1:00 Crowley, Sharon

IMAGINING TOMORROW: UTOPIAN / DYSTOPIAN LITERATURE (5 credits)

In this course, students will finish creating their year-one CUSP portfolios. As they engage reflectively with their own academic work, our readings in utopian/dystopian literature will explicitly encourage them also to think critically and imaginatively about how they will inhabit and help to build the world around them. Some have argued that a recent uptick both in production and popularity of utopian/dystopian SF is a symptom of late capitalism's tight hold on culture and politics. Explicitly future-facing "thought experiments" can serve as a crucial venue for imagining cultural and political possibilities that cannot be fully expressed in other forms. This literature raises important questions about how we imagine a future world and our own role(s) in building it: What from the present do we hope to preserve, or to change, and why? How are one's answers to those questions shaped by culture, history, and lived experience? What might a future look like, that "solves" the most pressing problems we face today? How do we account for the observation that one person's utopia is another's dystopia, and what implications does this have for us, as we make educational, political, and personal choices in the "real world"? In this VLPA course, students will consider these questions while reading a variety of utopian/dystopian texts, and constructing portfolios that are both reflective and projective.

Did You Know?

UW Bothell has been designated a veteran-friendly campus by the Washington State Department of Veterans Affairs.