Autumn 2015 Discovery Core I

 

10-Credit Discovery Core Options

 

Self and Society in Everyday Life (10 credits, B CORE 104A/107A, VLPA & I&S)

Tuesday/Thursday 8:45AM - 1:00PM
B CORE 104A and B CORE 107A
Instructors: Amoshaun Toft & Christian Anderson
 

Description: Everyday life in the modern world is complicated. Even though we may not realize it, many of the things that we do all the time and take for granted: the way we eat, work, get information, and organize our day to day lives have histories and geographies that connect us to other people and places in all sorts of intricate ways. This course will explore these connections and invite you to think hard about the inevitably social character of everyday life in the modern world.  Ultimately, this class aims to show how interconnected we really are, and to closely consider what that might mean for our lives and our futures, both as individuals and as a society. You will be asked to unpack the social worlds that are already folded into their own everyday lives. You will also be introduced to key academic skills and socio-cultural concepts in the process of critically analyzing how social structures are produced in and through ordinary, everyday activities with which you are already intimately familiar.

Place and Displacement in the Americas: Human Rights, Culture and Ethnicity (10 credits, B CORE 104B/107B, VLPA & I&S and W)

Monday/Wednesday 11:0AM - 3:15PM
B CORE 104B and B CORE 107B
Instructors: Jennifer Atkinson & Julie Shayne
 

Description: Students in this course will be introduced to key academic skills and socio-cultural concepts by asking them to critically analyze how social structures are produced in and through ordinary activities. The course will be organized around a series of scaffolded project-based assignments that will provide students with the opportunity to ask interdisciplinary questions, explore multiple methods of inquiry and discovery, and build social consciousness about how the world works and their place in it. 

Los Angeles: Land of Dreams, Land of Nightmares (10 credits, BCORE 104C/107C, VLPA & I&S)

Tuesday/Thursday 1:15PM - 5:30PM
BCORE 104C and B CORE 107C
Instructors: Michael Goldberg & Amparo Padilla

Description: In the national imaginary, LA is a land of sunshine, opportunity, and eternal optimism. In reality, the power structure of the city (whether City Hall or Hollywood) worked to create and manage an ideal that was in sharp tension with the realities and aspirations of Angelenos who didn't fit neatly into the myth. We will examine four key cultural-historical crossroads: the creation of the Hollywood myth and the erasure of numerous realities, including those related to race, ethnicity, religion and sexuality; the power connection between the power elite, water and the myth of endless growth, and its impact on the environment, class and region; the effect of World War II on the shifting intersectional relationships of race, ethnicity and class; and the unraveling of the myths starting with the Watts Riot of 1965 and culiminating in the LA Riots of 1991.  We will end by exploring how activists and politicians are working to deal creatively with the complex realities of contemporary Los Angeles. The course will combine historical thinking skills, close textual analysis, geographical knowledge, and theoretical concepts to help students appreciate the complex interactions between culture, politics and social reality.  Films to be studied include: Singing in the Rain, Pillow Talk, Chinatown, Zoot Suit, Killer of Sheep, and Crash (2004).

Thinking Beyond Borders: Philosophical Explorations of Science Fiction (10 credits, BCORE 104D/107D, VLPA &I&S and W)

Monday/Wednesday 1:15PM - 5:30PM
B CORE 104D and B CORE 107D
Instructors: David Nixon & Kristy Leissle

Description: This course explores philosophical and ethical questions of humanity through science fiction film and text. We are interested in the thresholds between emotions and logic, bodies and minds, and utopias and dystopias. We emphasize the social construction of gender, ability, and race, and explore how science fiction texts and films can reinforce or disrupt these essentialist, binary constructs—revealing our own social structures even as the genre helps us imagine more just ways of living. Students in this course author an original science fiction short story as the final project, building upon multiple writing assignments and workshops over the quarter.

Island and City: Discovering San Juan's and Seattle's History through Butterflies, Newspapers, Museums and Place (10 credits, BCORE 104E/110A, VLPA & NW)

Tuesday 8:45AM - 10:45AM and Friday 8:45AM - 1:00PM

Field trips TBA (primarily Fridays and Saturdays, including one overnight at San Juan Island from Friday, Oct.23, to Saturday, Oct. 24)
B CORE 104E and B CORE 110A
Instructors: Amy Lambert & Kristin Gustafson

Description: What happens when a butterfly species disappears for 90 years? Or a community's newspaper record can no longer be found? Students in this course look at absences and archives. We explore what gaps in the record mean and what is at stake when these occur. We look at the absences that are central to research produced by the two instructors. We visit to off-campus sites to explore how people across the arts, humanities, social sciences, and sciences creatively describe gaps in archives. We meet once a week for a two-hour, on-campus class meeting. This orients us to UWB and first-year learning experiences. We also engage on Fridays through extended off-campus activities and immersion in discovery. We will explore public art, dig into library microfilm, interview people, count invertebrates, and discover together. We spend the fourth Friday and Saturday of October on a two-day visit to Friday Harbor on San Juan Island, where we will conduct field research on butterflies and interview producers of a community newspaper. This experiential learning enables us to see what is present in the record, as we simultaneously explore what is not present; it provides space for students to reflect on this dynamic. Island and City Histories is a portfolio-based class that features students' creative communication to describe gaps in the record.

Gender Under Construction: Intersections, Roadblocks, Detours (10 credits, B CORE 107J/B WRIT 134O, I&S and C)

Monday/Wednesday 11:00 AM - 3:15PM
B CORE 107J and BWRIT 134O
Instructors: Karen Rosenberg & Lauren Lichty

Description: In this course we will consider gender as a social construct and lens through which we all experience our lives.  Through active inquiry and careful study we will develop a set of theoretical tools to examine how gender operates in our own lives and the spaces we inhabit.  We will consider gender at the intersection of other categories of difference, including race, class, sexuality, and nationality. We will use our theoretical tools to inform fieldwork and media analysis that we will conduct both in and outside of class.  Working collaboratively, we will pay particular attention to uncovering assumptions about gender roles and norms that we may have accepted as "natural."

Metro Rhetorics: Representations of Cities and Suburbs (10 credits, B CORE 107G/B WRIT 134M, I&S and C*)
*This course can also be taken as a 5-credit option without the composition (B WRIT 134M) See 5-credit Discovery Core Options for more information.

Monday/Wednesday 8:45AM - 1:00PM
B CORE 107G and  B WRIT 134M
Instructors: Ian Porter & Kristine Kellejian

Description: When you decided to attend university at UW Bothell, you chose a university campus situated among a sprawling metropolitan area, that is, a large geographic area composed of cities and suburbs. Metropolitan areas are made of more than buildings, streets, neighborhoods, and highways; they also emerge from the ways people imagine, remember, and depict their spaces, places, people, and boundaries. In this class, you will help to situate yourself in the context of this metropolis by using the artful practice of rhetoric. We will examine representations of the metropolis by looking at how humans construct urban and suburban spaces and places in acts of speaking, writing, making, and doing. This is useful in a practical way, because transitioning to college (often requiring you to travel long distances and live away from your family for the first time) can be disorienting and leave you feeling out of place. This class will help you re-orient yourself to this new space and place. But, it is also useful intellectually to begin thinking critically about how metropolitan spaces and places are made from language, culture, identity, memory, and history as much as from industrial materials like concrete and lumber. By analyzing historical and cultural texts, conducting fieldwork in the Seattle metropolitan area, and composing multimedia projects, you will situate your own first-year student experiences in the broader Seattle metropolitan environment.

Race and Racism in Higher Education (10 credits, B CORE 107I/B WRIT 134N, I&S and C)

*This course can also be taken as a 5-credit option without the composition (B WRIT 134N). See 5-credit Discovery Core Options for more information.

Tuesday/Thursday 8:45AM - 1:00PM
B CORE 107I and  B WRIT 134N
Instructors: Wayne Au & Mira Shimabukuro

Description: Issues of access to, and successful retention within, higher education are particularly salient for students of color, many of whom have been historically and culturally marginalized within systems of education in the United States. In addition to the expectations typical of a DCI course with regards to college resources, this course will look at the interplay of race (a biological fallacy) and racism (a socio-political fact) in the experiences of college-going students. In particular this course will explore issues such as college-entrance tests, affirmative action, stereotype threat, model minorities, and the relationship between language and student identity.

5-Credit Discovery Core Options     

 

Taking It Global: Skill Development for Business, Communications, and Humanities (5 credits, B CORE 104F, VLPA and W)

Tuesday/Thursday 8:45AM - 11:00 AM
B CORE 104F
Instructor: Tasha Butler

Description: This course develops skills employers currently look for: problem-solving and time management with proven experience in collaborating across diverse cultures and in virtual teams. We introduce students to academic expectations, to the Student Success Center, library tools, WACC, and QSC. The course prepares students to do well in their writing classes since assignments are scaffolded to build writing and digital media skills. We will be collaborating with peers in India and Brazil via Skype and Facebook on small group projects that teach research and collaboration. Students will practice finding alternative solutions when awkward cultural moments or technical difficulties arise, nurturing mental flexibility and effective problem-solving. 

Words, Voice, Movement: Reimagining Performance (5 credits, B CORE 104G, VLPA and W)

Tuesday/Thursday 11:00AM - 1:00PM
B CORE 104G
Instructor: Deborah Jacoby

Description: In this course we will work individually and collectively to create original performances in a supportive and interactive classroom community. This introduction to performance and writing will allow you to develop your artistic voice, and use movement to convey ideas. Through active participation in in-class writing and movement exercises, you will develop skills for devising performance projects and creating original compositions. This work will give you significant practice expressing yourself in writing and speaking in front of others--skills that are relevant in other classes and workplace contexts. My hope is that you will leave this course with a greater capacity for self-expression and connection to others.

Seeing is Believing (5 credits, B CORE 104H, VLPA)

Monday/Wednesday 11:00AM - 1:00PM
B CORE 104H
Instructor: Howard Hsu

Description: Seeing is Believing, introduces students to both the science of light and the photographic recording of light for personal expression. During the course, students will be introduced to the following topics and concepts: photography as a means of communication and an art form, the physical properties of light and its effect in the natural world, philosophical and early theories on light, and historical and contemporary photographers. The course will include in-class labs, demonstrations of physical properties of light and photographic principles, a research paper exploring a scientific phenomenon of light, and culminate with a personal photographic essay/series for the final project.

Arts in Healthcare (5 credits, B CORE 104I, VLPA)

Tuesday/Thursday 11:00AM - 1:00PM
B CORE 104I
Instructor: Andrea Kovalesky

Description: In this course we survey the use of various art modalities such as expressive writing, 2- and 3D  visual arts, music, dance, landscaping, and interior design currently being used in a wide range of healthcare settings (hospitals, skilled nursing facilities for elders, incarcerated youth settings, community centers). We use the book, Perceiving the arts:  An introduction to the humanities (Sporre, 2011, 10th ed.), as well as reading selected scholarly and popular articles for which reading guidelines are provided, and perusing related websites. Students also complete a weekly entry in a semi-structured journal entitled "Chill and Spill".

The Art of Myth: Sacred Stories Brought to Life (5 credits, B CORE 104J, VLPA and W)

Tuesday/Thursday 3:30PM - 5:30PM
B CORE 104J
Instructor: Gavin Doyle

Description: An exploration of folk tales, myths, & sacred stories selected from a diverse range of cultures, this class asks students to study differences, commonalities, and meaning. Further, students are asked to re-imagine stories and communicate their interpretations to an audience of peers through creative writing, spoken word, and stage movement. Students will write directed journals (reflecting on truths and stories important to themselves as individuals & as members of larger groups). Readings, assigned essays, & class discussions will pair with exercises. Student artifacts from the course will be transformed into final group performances and/or readings where students will re-create their own personal stories in the form of mythic tales.

Undocumented, Unafraid, Unapologetic: Youth Resistance and Social Change (5 credits, B CORE 107E, I&S)

Tuesday/Thursday 1:15pm - 3:15 PM
B CORE 107E
Instructor: Loren Redwood

Description: This course examines youth activism though a study of the growing movement of undocumented youths and a particular focus on immigration reform regarding access to education; specifically through the fight for government support of the Defense, Relief, and Education of Alien Minors Act, they are known as the DREAMers. These youth have taken a leading role in the debate over immigration reform building on a long history of immigrant resistance and social change. In this course students examine the emergence and growth of the movement and investigate the ways in which they were able to organize and collaborate with others. This course is also designed to connect students to the campus community through involvement in on-campus social action.

Metro Rhetorics: Representations of Cities and Suburbs (5 credits, B CORE 107F, I&S*)

*This class can also be taken as a 10-credit class with Composition. Refer to 10-credit Discovery Core options for more information.

Monday/Wednesday 8:45AM - 10:45AM
B CORE 107F
Instructors: Ian Porter & Kristine Kellejian 

Description: When you decided to attend university at UW Bothell, you chose a university campus situated among a sprawling metropolitan area, that is, a large geographic area composed of cities and suburbs. Metropolitan areas are made of more than buildings, streets, neighborhoods, and highways; they also emerge from the ways people imagine, remember, and depict their spaces, places, people, and boundaries. In this class, you will help to situate yourself in the context of this metropolis by using the artful practice of rhetoric. We will examine representations of the metropolis by looking at how humans construct urban and suburban spaces and places in acts of speaking, writing, making, and doing. This is useful in a practical way, because transitioning to college (often requiring you to travel long distance and live away from your family for the first time) can be disorienting and leave you feeling out of place. This class will help you re-orient yourself to this new space and place. But, it is also useful intellectually to begin thinking critically about how metropolitan spaces and places are made from language, culture, identity, memory, and history as much as from industrial materials like concrete and lumber. By analyzing historical and cultural texts, conducting fieldwork in the Seattle metropolitan area, and composing multimedia projects, you will situate your own first-year student experiences in the broader Seattle metropolitan environment.

Race and Racism in Higher Education (5 credits, B CORE 107H, I&S*)

*This class can also be taken as a 10-credit class with Composition. Refer to 10-credit Discovery Core options for more information.

Tuesday/Thursday 11:00AM - 1:00PM
B CORE 107H
Instructors: Wayne Au & Mira Shimabukuro

Description: Issues of access to, and successful retention within, higher education are particularly salient for students of color, many of whom have been historically and culturally marginalized within systems of education in the United States. In addition to the expectations typical of a DCI course with regards to college resources, this course will look at the interplay of race (a biological fallacy) and racism (a socio-political fact) in the experiences of college-going students. In particular this course will explore issues such as college-entrance tests, affirmative action, stereotype threat, model minorities, and the relationship between language and student identity.

Farm 2 Fork (Fa2Fo): Local to Global Perspectives (5 credits, B CORE 110B, NW and W)

Friday 11:00AM - 3:15PM
B CORE 110B
Instructors: Maureen "Mo" West & Annie Bruck

Description: Our day-to-day decisions surrounding food have important personal and local to global community consequences.  Misinformation and conflicting messages about the quality, safety and health benefits of our food supply are common, making it difficult to know what to eat, as well as where to buy and how best to prepare various foods. In this course we will integrate topics that include understanding select historical and cultural paradigms of food cultivation and consumption; identifying major nutrition problems and guidelines; generating sustainable solutions from individual, local, and global perspectives; and participating in a community food service project.

Dice, Cards, and Pieces: The Hidden History of Science of Games (5 credits, B CORE 110C, NW)

Tuesday/Thursday 3:30PM - 5:30PM
B CORE 110C
Instructor: Brandon Finley

Description: This course uses games as a means of cross-discipline exploration.  Through the study of specific games (dice, cards, chess, Monopoly) students are introduced to history, economics, mathematics, arts, and psychology.  Games are used to develop and discuss critical thinking, strategy vs. tactics, resource management, and other skills students will be able to link to their college experience.  The course environment encourages both cooperation and friendly competition with lots of opportunity for interaction in- and outside of the games themselves.  As a crowning project students will develop and teach others to play an original game and use this as a base for reflection on how their game builds on the themes discussed in the course.

Mythbusters! (5 credits, B CORE 110D, NW)

*This class is reserved only for students who are participating in the STEM Living Learning Community*

Tuesday/Thursday 1:15PM-3:15PM
Instructor: Charity Lovitt

Description: In many ways this is not a science course, but a course about science. We aren’t here to focus on learning the right equations, codes, or formulas to answer any particular question, but to spend time discussing, practicing, and reflecting on what it means to be a scientist and how scientists approach the world around them. This course, and the linked residential community, is for students who have a passion for innovation and discovery in the fields of science and technology. This community welcomes students interested in environmental, biological, and health sciences, as well us electrical engineering, math, physics, computing & software systems, and video game technology. What all of these fields share are scientific habits of mind – habits like curiosity, skepticism, and investigation – that build new and innovative ideas.  The experiments and projects will be developed around your own interest, but rockets, catapults, and other “do not try this at home” activities are not out of the question!  

 

Area of Knowledge Key:

 

VLPA - Visual, Literary, and Performing Arts
I&S- Individual and Societies
NW- Natural World
W- Writing
C- Composition