Center for International Education

Alumni

If you can imagine it, you can achieve it.
If you can dream it, you can become it.

-William Arthur Ward

Congratulations on your graduation! This is a big milestone for you, and CIE is very proud of you! The following are helpful resources to guide you through the next steps as you prepare for your next big steps!

 Network with Alumni and Current UWB International Students through
UW Bothell's International Student LinkedIn Group

Networking is a fantastic and effective strategy to help you find internship and job opportunities in the U.S. and back in your home country. You should always make sure that your LinkedIn profile includes current information and a professional photo.

  Are you interested to work in the U.S. after graduation? Apply for Optional Practical Training (OPT) with the CIE Office at the start of your graduation quarter

OPT is work authorization in the U.S. after you graduate. It is an opportunity for you to gets professional work experience related to your degree after graduation. Students must apply to USCIS within 90 days before the end date of the quarter in which they anticipate to graduate. We encourages to you attend an upcoming OPT Workshop to learn about the application process.

  Does Your Family & Friends Want to Attend the Graduation Ceremony?
  Support Your Family & Friends' Tourist (B) Visa Application

As the student in the U.S., you can help support their Tourist (B) Visa application. We have put together a handout with information on to help you and your family.

 

  Join UW Bothell Alumni Association / Find Huskies in your Region & Home Country
  through the Alumni Map

Being part of the UW Alumni Association has many benefits and discounts. We also encourage you to connect with our  UW Bothell Alumni Association and visit their Facebook page ! Huskies can be found across the United States and around the world. Browse the Alumni Map to see our regional and international groups. 

travel-home.jpg  Plan Your Return Home : Preparing for Reverse Culture Shock


Think back to your first few weeks in the United States. Do you remember feeling excited, nervous, anxious or even a bit stressed? The emotional highs and lows that you experience while adjusting to the American way of life are also experienced when you return home. This experience of "re-entry shock" is normal and we hope that you use the following suggestions to help you prepare for returning home.

Some common feelings about returning home are:

  • Everyone at home has changed. I've changed.
  • Everyone at home looks the same, where’s the diversity?
  • I miss the freedom and independence I felt while I was in the U.S.
  • Why do I feel so bad about being home? Why don’t they believe me that this transition to return home is hard?

Strategies to help you deal with re-entry:

One of the best ways to cope successfully with the re-entry process is to prepare yourself before returning home. It is helpful to have realistic expectations and to have thought through the re-entry process before experiencing it.

  • Be patient with yourself and others.
  • Befriend other people who have had an intercultural/international experience.
  • Keep in touch with your friends, professors, co-workers, and advisors in Washington.
  • Understand that it is ok and only natural to compare cultures, but try not to be too negative or boastful. Rather, focus on adopting positive aspects of both cultures for yourself.
  • Remember that “home” is within yourself; there is always a choice which set of cultural values you will use in any given situation.
  • Find creative ways to keep up with your English skills, such as watching American movies, and reading books, magazines or newspapers in English.
  • Use your English skills in a helpful way with others.
  • Meet with a career counselor to go over your resume and career options to include your international experience in a culturally appropriate manner.
  • Volunteer to give a presentation about your experience in the U.S. to a local school.
  • Check with local study abroad recruitment services and/or universities to see how you can help recruit students to study overseas or volunteer to help at an orientation for international students.
  • Join an English club or volunteer to teach English at a school or to family members/friends.
  • Organize a gathering of fellow UW alumni.
  • Volunteer to become a host family or language partner for an international student.
  • Join a professional organization in your field.