Community Based Learning and Research

CBLR Faculty and Staff Fellows 2013-2014

 


 

Christian Anderson, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor, School of Interdisciplinary Arts and Sciences
http://www.uwb.edu/ias/faculty-and-staff/christiananderson

Fellowship Project
Strategic Organizing for Community Relationships and
Participatory Action in Lake City/Northeast Seattle

My research focuses on the ways that everyday practices intersect with broader political-economic and cultural processes in and across space, particularly in cities. I approach these questions using ethnography to empirically examine everyday life. In so doing, I emphasize the actual experiences and lived details of processes—for example, globalization and gentrification—that have previously been understood largely through abstract macro theory. My work also grapples with disquieting questions of inequality, structural violence, and human struggle as they are lived within these contexts.

 


 

Aina Braxton
Program Coordinator, Digital Futures Lab
http://www.bothell.washington.edu/digitalfuture/about/staff

Fellowship Project
Strategic Organizing for Community Relationships and
Participatory Action in Lake City/Northeast Seattle

Aina Braxton is the Program Coordinator at the Digital Future Lab.  She graduated in 2012 from the University of Washington Bothell with her B.A. in Law, Economics, and Public Policy and a minor in Human Rights. She has been a performance artist and community activist in the greater Seattle area since she was four years old participating in events such as North West Folklife Festival, Fremont Street Fair Parade, Tacoma First Night, and partnerships with the Greenwood Senior Center, Indian Heritage Middle College, and University Beyond Bars.  Her passion for social justice, education, and performance drive her work.  She is interested in the overlaps between performance art and digital technology and how new technology can be used as an instrument for emancipatory education and social change.  At the DFL she worked as unit director on an experimental film, oversaw a multi class and multi-vendor public art project, and hosts various human rights advocates as guest lecturers.

 


 

Johanna Crane, Ph.D.
Lecturer, School of Interdisciplinary Arts and Sciences
http://www.uwb.edu/ias/faculty-and-staff/johannacrane

Fellowship Project
Community-Based Research on Health and Aging in Prison

Johanna’s ICBLR project is part of a groundswell of interest in and work related to incarceration on the UW-Bothell campus. Johanna aims to develop a Community-Based ethnographic research project that examines practices and experiences of prison medicine at the Washington State Reformatory (WSR) in Monroe, WA. Some of the questions she hopes to explore through her project are... what does it mean to seek (and deliver) care in a context of punishment?  How are aging and illness managed in a correctional context?  What are the concerns and priorities of prisoners, families, and medical professionals regarding health and aging in prison?  The project aims to both improve incarcerated individuals’ access to and experiences with medical care, and contribute to broader efforts to end mass incarceration.

 


 

 

Kristin Gustafson, Ph.D.
Lecturer, School of Interdisciplinary Arts and Sciences
http://www.uwb.edu/ias/faculty-and-staff/kristingustafson

Fellowship Project
Community-Based Research on Health and Aging in Prison

Questions about journalism practices drive my current research. These practices are found as part of organizations, within marginalized communities, during different periods of history, and in varied formats of media. My research examines the symbiotic relationship between social movements and grassroots U.S. newspapers that is both historically and politically intertwined. I ask how these newspapers began, how they operated, how they changed over time, how workers operated as journalists, and how they balanced loyalties. The answers add complexity to the role of media in democracy and the role of community and activism in journalism. My most recent project focuses on the histories of two grassroots, activist Seattle newspapers that emerged in the post-Civil Rights era. Both newspapers published for more than thirty-five years since the 1970s and provided a voice initially absent from or oftentimes stereotyped in mainstream media—the first for multiple generations of Chinese, Japanese, Filipino, Korean, Vietnamese, and other Asian Americans living in or associated with the Seattle’s International District, and the second for gay, lesbian, bi-sexual, transgender, and queer people in Seattle. Related to these questions about journalism practices, I also ask where and how marginalized communities use their political voice. This resulted in participatory action research with and a manual for people (teachers and policymakers) conversing about issues of climate, sustainability, and environment.

 


 

Janelle M Silva, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor, School of Interdisciplinary Arts and Sciences
http://www.uwb.edu/ias/faculty-and-staff/janellesilva

Fellowship Project
Developing & Evaluating a Pilot K-12 Program for
Global Citizenship and Leadership Skills

 

As a community psychologist, my overarching research examines how social institutions can empower and engage young people to be positive agents of change in their communities; in turn, developing skills for the future. In collaboration with Dr. Paul Markham and founder of Power to Define Luis Ortega, we are developing a pilot program for the Secondary Academy of Success (SAS) in the Northshore School District.  Entitled the “21st Century Global Citizenship & Leadership Lab,” this pilot program focuses on positive youth development to facilitate students’ skill development.  UWB undergraduates will take on the role of “coaches” in the school as they work with students from across the K-12 classrooms. The overall objectives of the program are to foster positive identity, social competencies, a commitment to learning, and positive values. 

 


 

Bill Erdly, Ph.D.
Director, Interactive Media Design
http://www.uwb.edu/css/about/faculty/research/erdly

Fellowship Project
The Tribal Education Network (T-E-N)

 

Bill is a graduate of the University of Washington where he received his Ph.D. in social/organizational psychology.   He has held significant leadership positions in a variety of industry and government technology organizations – and continues his involvement in software innovation with industry and community partners. This on-going experience serves as a baseline for his research interests in social computing/analytics, human-computer interaction, game design/mechanics, wide area network (WAN) design, computer science research methods, health care informatics and software engineering/project management.  He was the founding Director of the CSS program, and currently serves as the Director of the newly launched Interactive Media Design (IMD) degree.

 


 

Deanna M. Kennedy, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor, School of Business
http://www.uwb.edu/business/faculty/dkennedy/dkennedy-bio

Fellowship Project
The Tribal Education Network (T-E-N)

 

Deanna M. Kennedy is an Assistant Professor in the School of Business at the University of Washington Bothell. She holds a B.S. in Biological Sciences from the University of California, Davis and an MBA with honors from Golden Gate University in San Francisco, California. She received her PhD in Management Science from the Isenberg School of Management, University of Massachusetts Amherst. Her dissertation won the 2009 Dissertation Prize for research on small groups by the Group Psychology and Group Psychotherapy Division of the American Psychological Association. Dr. Kennedy’s research interests include the utilization of cognition, communication, and collaboration in group and team operations. Her research has been published in Production Planning and ControlTheoretical Issues in Ergonomics Science, and Decision Sciences. She is a member of the Interdisciplinary Network for Group Research (INGRoup) and Institute for Operations Research and the Management Sciences (INFORMS).

 


 

Jonathan Murr
Lecturer, School of Interdisciplinary Arts and Sciences
jmurr@washington.edu
 

Fellowship Project
The Culture, Movement, and Social Transformations

The Culture, Movement, and Social Transformations Project is intended to build and deepen connections between UWB students and faculty and local arts and performance communities. Advancing a critical interdisciplinary approach to thinking about the creation, circulation, reception, and politics of different forms of cultural production, including performance, dance, music, and visual art, the project and course will engage members of the UWB community in the role of cultural work in imagining and enacting social transformations. Based on connections developed as part of Jed's BIS 216: Introduction to Cultural Studies course and his years of labor with the Race/Knowledge Project collective at UW Seattle, Culture, Movement and Social Transformations invites students to write and create for multiple publics and in a variety of modes, from blog entries and YouTube reviews to community radio pieces and creative visual and sonic texts in dialogue with local art and performance. The project is centered around three local community-partnership sites (the non-profit, artist-run gallery SOIL, the local hip-hop scene, and Velocity Dance Center) and, among other things, it encourages students to produce work for potential placement with local periodicals, online journals, and the new UWB radio station. Turning to different community sites as domains of knowledge production, students' engagement with the problems and politics of culture and possibilities for social transformation will be enriched by enabling them to think with and alongside differently located cultural workers and their practices. While the project draws from Jed's collaborations with artists and his research and writing on visual, literary, and popular cultures and the politics of race and gender in the contemporary US, the aim is to develop and model sustainable relationships and practices that other UWB students and faculty can utilize and further in coming years.  

 


 

Lauren Lichty, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor, School of Interdisciplinary Arts and Sciences
https://www.uwb.edu/ias/faculty-and-staff/newfacultybios

Fellowship Project
Ecological Reconnaissance in the Classroom

 

Lauren Lichty earned her doctorate in Ecological-Community Psychology from Michigan State University in 2010, with a specialization in Quantitative Methods and Evaluation Sciences. Since completing her degree, she directed a state-wide youth leadership development evaluation in West Virginia, served as a post-doctoral research associate in the Center for Culturally Responsive Evaluation and Assessment at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, and was a Visiting Assistant Professor at Portland State University. Dr. Lichty is interested in promoting individual and community health, empowerment, and social justice. Most of her work focuses on youth, sexual health, and spans multiple social ecological levels, including public policies (e.g., K-12 sexual harassment policies), community- and school-based services (e.g., school-based health centers, rape crisis centers), and the relationship between individual behavior and social environments (e.g., how individuals’ relationships with their parents, peers, and schools relate to early sexual behavior). She is particularly interested in finding creative ways to partner with youth on issues that they identify as important.

 


 

Rebeca Rivera, Ph.D.
Lecturer, School of Interdisciplinary Arts and Sciences
https://www.uwb.edu/ias/faculty-and-staff
 

Fellowship Project
Campus Community Garden

Rebeca Rivera is an avid gardener, community organizer, and experiential educator and aims to bring together her interests to assist in developing a viable community garden on the UWB campus.  In the summer of 2013 she started participating in meetings with students, faculty, and staff with a goal of creating a garden space at UWB.  A campus garden would facilitate community engagement, build horticultural skills, and be an on campus resource for community based learning and research projects.  

Rebeca recently received her Ph.D. in environmental anthropology with a graduate certificate in urban ecology from UW Seattle.  Her graduate work in environmental anthropology focused on the sustainable consumption practices of Seattle based intentional communities, while her interdisciplinary research in urban ecology examined the processes and impacts of second home development in Washington State.  She began teaching in IAS as a PIP fellow and currently teaches courses on human/environment interactions and sustainability in IAS and CUPS.  Her research focuses on sustainable consumption,  social justice, common property management, and housing and urban development.

 

2013 – 2014 FACULTY/STAFF FELLOWSHIP PROJECTS

 

Strategic Organizing for Community Relationships and

Participatory Action in Lake City/Northeast Seattle

 

Christian Anderson, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor, School of Interdisciplinary Arts and Sciences
http://www.uwb.edu/ias/faculty-and-staff/christiananderson

Aina Braxton
Program Coordinator, Digital Futures Lab
http://www.bothell.washington.edu/digitalfuture/about/staff
 

Our proposed collaborative project is a preliminary step towards the establishment of a broader long-term relationship between the University of Washington Bothell and communities in Lake City/Northeast Seattle. We will use the fellowship and the workshops as a springboard to evaluate possibilities for and begin the development of a suite of community based activities that will eventually include:

1) Arts-based youth programming in collaboration with the YMCA of Lake City, to be implemented in conjunction with community driven participatory asset mapping exercises geared towards identifying opportunities for our longer term objectives 

2) A wider range of participatory action research and community based learning activities in Lake City, including additional youth and social reproduction/social justice oriented programs, possibly in collaboration with the “Beyond the Carceral State” and campus organizing initiatives also becoming established at UWB.

 

 

Community-Based Research on Health and Aging in Prison

Johanna Crane, Ph.D.
Lecturer, School of Interdisciplinary Arts and Sciences
http://www.uwb.edu/ias/faculty-and-staff/johannacrane

Johanna’s ICBLR project is part of a groundswell of interest in and work related to incarceration on the UW-Bothell campus. Johanna aims to develop a Community-Based ethnographic research project that examines practices and experiences of prison medicine at the Washington State Reformatory (WSR) in Monroe, WA. Some of the questions she hopes to explore through her project are... what does it mean to seek (and deliver) care in a context of punishment?  How are aging and illness managed in a correctional context?  What are the concerns and priorities of prisoners, families, and medical professionals regarding health and aging in prison?  The project aims to both improve incarcerated individuals’ access to and experiences with medical care, and contribute to broader efforts to end mass incarceration.

 

 

Nikkei Newspaper Digital Archive Project (NNDAP)

Kristin Gustafson, Ph.D.
Lecturer, School of Interdisciplinary Arts and Sciences
http://www.uwb.edu/ias/faculty-and-staff/kristingustafson


The NNDAP aligns with Kristin’s interests in Asian American media, the Pacific Northwest, journalism history, and social change. Kristin’s ICBLR Fellowship aims to assist the shared efforts of the Hokubei Hochi Foundation and the University of Washington Libraries Digital Initiatives Program through the recruitment of more UWB students so that NNDAP can successfully create a digital archive and related metadata and continue efforts to showcase this pilot effort to secure future funding. In addition, she hopes to use this work to enliven the senior spring 2014 seminar she is developing on “Asian American Media in the Pacific Northwest” to enhanced CBLR opportunities such as enabling students to engage with the North American Post in deeper context and with greater understanding of the broader efforts toward community preservation.

 

 

Developing & Evaluating a Pilot K-12 Program for
Global Citizenship and Leadership Skills

Janelle M Silva, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor, School of Interdisciplinary Arts and Sciences
http://www.uwb.edu/ias/faculty-and-staff/janellesilva

As a community psychologist, my overarching research examines how social institutions can empower and engage young people to be positive agents of change in their communities; in turn, developing skills for the future. In collaboration with Dr. Paul Markham and founder of Power to Define Luis Ortega, we are developing a pilot program for the Secondary Academy of Success (SAS) in the Northshore School District.  Entitled the “21st Century Global Citizenship & Leadership Lab,” this pilot program focuses on positive youth development to facilitate students’ skill development.  UWB undergraduates will take on the role of “coaches” in the school as they work with students from across the K-12 classrooms. The overall objectives of the program are to foster positive identity, social competencies, a commitment to learning, and positive values. 

 

 

The Tribal Education Network (T-E-N)

Bill Erdly, Ph.D.
Director, Interactive Media Design
http://www.uwb.edu/css/about/faculty/research/erdly
   
Deanna M. Kennedy, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor, School of Business
http://www.uwb.edu/business/faculty/dkennedy/dkennedy-bio
 

As fellows of the Community-Based Learning and Research, we aim to advance our goals of research and education as we develop and implement the Tribal Education Network (T-E-N) project. T-E-N is a developing partnership between the University of Washington Bothell and Indian peoples within the Northwest to provide culturally-relevant, innovative curricula for tribal members preparing for, and beginning, their college-level studies. The T-E-N project will 1) enhance the research of the fellows who will explore pedagogical and educational best practices; 2) benefit tribes through tribal youth development; and 3) contribute to UW student learning through meaningful projects involving case designs, technology/media development, and opportunities to work with tribal mentors and educators.

 

 

Culture, Movement, and Social Transformations Project

Jonathan Murr
Lecturer, School of Interdisciplinary Arts and Sciences

The Culture, Movement, and Social Transformations Project is intended to build and deepen connections between UWB students and faculty and local arts and performance communities. Advancing a critical interdisciplinary approach to thinking about the creation, circulation, reception, and politics of different forms of cultural production, including performance, dance, music, and visual art, the project and course will engage members of the UWB community in the role of cultural work in imagining and enacting social transformations. Based on connections developed as part of Jed's BIS 216: Introduction to Cultural Studies course and his years of labor with the Race/Knowledge Project collective at UW Seattle, Culture, Movement and Social Transformations invites students to write and create for multiple publics and in a variety of modes, from blog entries and YouTube reviews to community radio pieces and creative visual and sonic texts in dialogue with local art and performance. The project is centered around three local community-partnership sites (the non-profit, artist-run gallery SOIL, the local hip-hop scene, and Velocity Dance Center) and, among other things, it encourages students to produce work for potential placement with local periodicals, online journals, and the new UWB radio station. Turning to different community sites as domains of knowledge production, students' engagement with the problems and politics of culture and possibilities for social transformation will be enriched by enabling them to think with and alongside differently located cultural workers and their practices. While the project draws from Jed's collaborations with artists and his research and writing on visual, literary, and popular cultures and the politics of race and gender in the contemporary US, the aim is to develop and model sustainable relationships and practices that other UWB students and faculty can utilize and further in coming years.  

 

 

Ecological Reconnaissance in the Classroom


Lauren Lichty, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor, School of Interdisciplinary Arts and Sciences
https://www.uwb.edu/ias/faculty-and-staff/newfacultybios


Ecological reconnaissance (e.g., Kelly, 1988) is a process of mapping the social, organizational, and political landscape of a community in relation to a particular social issue. The act of ecological reconnaissance grounds individuals in the community context and encourages meaningful reflection on how the social ecology informs the creation, maintenance, and response to a social issue, including the role of power, voice, and the flow of resources. One primary goal of the Ecological Reconnaissance in the Classroom project is to develop a set of assignments that will integrate students into this process. The assignments will be developed in a way that can be readily adapted to multiple classroom contexts and facilitate building a multifaceted local understanding of a social issue. All resources developed from this project will be made available to students, faculty, and community members to facilitate opportunities for learning and engagement more broadly.
 

 

Campus Community Garden

Rebeca Rivera, Ph.D.
Lecturer, School of Interdisciplinary Arts and Sciences
https://www.uwb.edu/ias/faculty-and-staff

Planning and implementing a community garden would easily build capacity for other UWB faculty to participate in community-engaged teaching. There are multiple ways in which community gardens offer unique opportunities for learning and community engagement. Bringing people (UWB faculty and students) onboard in the planning stages allows faculty to engage with and gain a sense of ownership and dedication to a community garden. Early engagement in the development process would create networks of faculty in different departments who both support and utilize a community garden space. After a community garden is developed it represents an opportunity for faculty to easily accommodate CBLR opportunities for their students.

One of my goals in working on a community garden on campus is to connect and maintain mutually beneficial relationships with a variety of local organizations. These organizations (such as City Fruit, the Beacon Hill Food Forest, among others) may offer a community garden support through mentoring of students and faculty about the process and horticultural practices. We may assist their organizations through increased CBLR opportunities for students.

Further, I think both the development and management of a community garden on campus would offer students, including my own, CBLR opportunities to work in and around the garden. Students would be able to apply course concepts to the community garden work, build community on campus, and serve as a way to broaden student and faculty engagement at the university.