Student Conduct & Responsibility

The Student Conduct Code for the University of Washington was updated in November 2007 and became effective on December 20, 2007. Each student is held responsible for being knowledgeable about all of the requirements of the University of Washington Student Conduct Code, which can be found at http://apps.leg.wa.gov/WAC/default.aspx?cite=478-120&full=true.

The UW Bothell community recognizes that when the academic and behavioral conduct of a university is compromised, the quality of the student's education and the value of the degree are also compromised. Therefore, all members of the University community are committed to vigorously upholding the University of Washington Student Conduct Code (WAC 478-120-010-145) and are encouraged to report suspected occurrences of academic dishonesty or behavioral misconduct.

How may I file a Disciplinary Complaint Against a Student?

Any member of the institution may initiate a complaint against a currently enrolled UW Bothell student  by completing and submitting a Student Conduct Incident Report to the Office of the Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs. Complaints must be based on an alleged violation of the rules, regulations, procedures, policies, and standards of conduct that safeguard University functions and protect the rights and freedoms of all members of the academic community. (Refer to WAC 478-120-020 for more information on general and specific instances of misconduct.)

Complaints Specific to Academic Misconduct

Faculty members who suspect that academic misconduct has been committed should, in most cases, first attempt to discuss the matter with the student in question. (Note that this is an optional step for the faculty member and not a requirement.) The faculty member should:

A. Notify the student that he or she suspects a violation has occurred. Every reasonable effort should be made to ensure that the student receives this initial communication. (It's advisable to keep a copy of any written notification.)

B. Request that the student meet with him or her to discuss the matter on or before a specified date and time.

C. Following the meeting, send the student a brief written statement summarizing the discussion.

D. In the case of suspected academic misconduct, if no response is received from the student by the date specified by the course instructor, a grade of "0" for that specific assignment may be given by the instructor. If a response is received from the student that does not resolve the matter to the satisfaction of the instructor, and the processes described below are being followed, a grade of "X" should be issued for the course, to be amended when the process is completed.

When discussing the matter with the student, the faculty member will explain how the student's conduct appears to violate the Student Conduct Code for the University of Washington  (WAC 478-120) The faculty member will offer the student the chance to dispute his or her assessment of a suspected violation. This initial discussion has two possible outcomes:

A. The faculty member is satisfied by the student's explanation that no misconduct occurred, in which case no further discussion or disciplinary action is necessary.

B. The faculty member may immediately move to initiate a complaint when the student admits to the alleged misconduct or the faculty member is not satisfied by the student's explanation and believes that the student violated the Student Conduct Code. If the timing of an incident of alleged academic misconduct is such that the faculty member must submit grades before there is an outcome to the process, the instructor should assign an "X" for that particular assignment or course grade. The grade may be changed at a later time as or if warranted.

What Happens after a Disciplinary Complaint is Filed?

An administrative hearing officer appointed by the Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs will review the Incident Report, including any accompanying evidence, and determine whether or not to initiate disciplinary charges against the student(s) named in the report. If charges are warranted, then the hearing officer (known as the Initiating Hearing Officer) will contact the student(s) and schedule a hearing as per the process identified in the Student Conduct Code (refer to WAC 478-120-065)..The purpose of the hearing is to provide an opportunity for the student(s) to respond to allegations of misconduct before disciplinary action is taken. The student waives any rights to an informal hearing by his or her failure to attend.All University of Washington students are expected to conduct themselves as responsible members of the academic community. Among the standards of conduct for UW students includes the responsibility to practice "high standards of academic and professional honesty and integrity."  WAC 478-120-020(2) (a).

Academic misconduct includes but is not limited to cheating, facilitation, plagiarism, and fabrication in connection with any exam, research, course assignment, or other academic exercise that contributes, in whole or in part, to the satisfaction of requirements for courses or graduation.  The following definitions, while not exhaustive, are intended to provide examples of the types of activities that can give rise to a charge of academic misconduct.

How Can I Avoid Academic Dishonesty?

All University of Washington students are expected to conduct themselves as responsible members of the academic community. Among the standards of conduct for UW students includes the responsibility to practice "high standards of academic and professional honesty and integrity."  WAC 478-120-020(2) (a).

Academic misconduct includes but is not limited to cheating, facilitation, plagiarism, and fabrication in connection with any exam, research, course assignment, or other academic exercise that contributes, in whole or in part, to the satisfaction of requirements for courses or graduation.  The following definitions, while not exhaustive, are intended to provide examples of the types of activities that can give rise to a charge of academic misconduct.

Cheating: Giving or receiving unauthorized assistance, or intentionally using or attempting to use unauthorized materials or information.

Examples include but are not limited to:

Facilitation: Helping or attempting to help another student engage in academic misconduct.

Examples include but are not limited to:

Plagiarism: Using another person's original words, ideas, or research, including material found on the Internet, in any academic exercise without properly crediting that person.

Examples include but are not limited to:

Fabrication: Creating false information or data and presenting it as fact.

Examples include but are not limited to:  

Guidelines for Avoiding Academic Misconduct

The following guidelines are intended to help UW Bothell students make responsible choices involving matters of academic conduct and to help them understand their individual responsibilities and obligations as members of the University community.

Make safe assumptions about academic honor: It is your responsibility to understand and follow academic standards for crediting the sources of ideas, information, and phraseology to avoid plagiarizing.