Bachelor of Arts in Interdisciplinary Studies

The Interdisciplinary Arts and Sciences Program offers students advanced interdisciplinary study in the arts and sciences. Students develop their ability to think analytically, critically and imaginatively; communicate logically and persuasively; and work creatively with others. These abilities prepare students to participate in workplace and civic leadership in a democratic society, to enrich their personal lives and their communities, and to appreciate and care for the natural environment. A liberal education develops both the knowledge underlying technical and professional learning, and the values on which enterprises, institutions, and global civilization depend.

Faculty

Interim Director

Bruce Burgett, Ph.D., 1993, University of California, Berkeley; English

Associate Directors

Diane Gillespie, Ph.D., 1982, University of Nebraska, Lincoln; educational psychology and social foundations

Martha Groom, Ph.D., 1995, University of Washington; zoology, conservation biology

Professors

Bruce Burgett, Ph.D., 1993, University of California, Berkeley; English

Warren Buck, Ph.D., 1976 (Chancellor Emeritus), College of William and Mary; Physics

JoLynn Edwards, Ph.D., 1982, University of Washington; art history

Diane Gillespie, Ph.D., 1982, University of Nebraska, Lincoln; educational psychology and social foundations

Jeanne Heuving, Ph.D., 1988, University of Washington; English

Charles Jackels, Ph.D., 1975, University of Washington; physical chemistry

Daniel Jacoby, Ph.D., 1985, University of Washington; economics

Daniel Jaffe, Ph.D., 1987, University of Washington; chemistry

Gray Kochhar-Lindgren, Ph.D., 1990, Emory University; literature and cultural theory

Norman Rose, (Emeritus) Ph.D., 1960, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign; chemistry

Robert C. Schultz, (Emeritus), Ph.D., 1969, Emory University; philosophy

William Seaburg, Ph.D., 1994, University of Washington; anthropology

Linda S. Watts, Ph.D., 1989, Yale University; American studies

Alan Wood, Ph.D., 1981, University of Washington; history

Associate Professors

Constantin Behler, Ph.D., 1990, Stanford University; German studies and humanities

Steven Collins, Ph.D., 1994, University of Virginia; government and foreign affairs

Colin Danby, Ph.D., 1997, University of Massachusetts, Amherst; economics

Nives Dolšak, Ph.D., 2000, Indiana University, Bloomington; public policy, environmental policy, international relations

Warren Gold, Ph.D., 1988, Utah State University, Logan; plant ecology

Michael Goldberg, Ph.D., 1992, Yale University; American studies

Martha Groom, Ph.D., 1995, University of Washington; zoology, conservation biology

Kanta Kochhar-Lindgren, Ph.D., 1999, New York University; performance studies

Marc Servetnick,  Ph.D., 1985, University of California, Berkeley; zoology

David L. Stokes, Ph.D., 1994, University of Washington; zoology

Elizabeth Thomas, Ph.D., 1998, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign; community psychology

Assistant Professors

Benjamin Gardner, Ph.D., 2007, University of California, Berkeley; geography

Susan Harwood, Ph.D., 2006, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign; communications

Cinnamon Hillyard, Ph.D., 1999, Utah State University, Logan; mathematics

Ron Krabill, Ph.D., 2003, New School for Social Research; sociology and historical studies

Kari Lerum, Ph.D., 2000, University of Washington; sociology

Peter Littig, Ph.D., 2005, University of Washington; mathematics

Joe Milutis, Ph.D., 2000, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee; modern studies

Keith Nitta, Ph.D., 2006, University of California, Berkeley; political science

Rebecca M. Price, Ph.D., 2003, The University of Chicago; evolutionary biology

J. Eric Stewart, Ph.D., 2000, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign; community and clinical psychology

Robert J. Turner, Ph.D., 1999, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill; marine sciences

Wadiya Udell, Ph.D., 2004, Columbia University: developmental psychology

Senior Lecturers

Michael Gillespie, Ph.D., 1974, Southern Illinois University; philosophy

Bruce Kochis, Ph.D., 1979, University of Michigan; Slavic languages and literature

Genevieve McCoy, Ph.D., (delete)

John R. Rasmussen, Ph.D., 1972, Dartmouth College; mathematics

Bachelor of Arts in Interdisciplinary Arts and Sciences

Admission Requirements

NOTE: IAS conducts a holistic review of all applications.  A 2.5 minimum cumulative gpa is expected.  Special circumstances may allow for admission of students with lower cumulative gpas (between 2.0 and 2.4).

Applicants applying with 80 or more credits:

1.      3 years high school math (2 years algebra) or Intermediate algebra in college. Minimum grade of

         2.0 if taken in college.

2.      Two years (high school) OR 10 quarter credits (college) of a single foreign language or through

         102 with a passing grade.

3.      English Composition (Five quarter credits), 10 credits preferred to include a writing and research

         course.

4.      Quantitative/Symbolic Reasoning (Five quarter credits in Math or Logic). Does not apply to

         students who enrolled in college for the first time prior to Autumn Quarter, 1985.

5.      15 quarter credits in Natural World*

6.      15 quarter credits in Visual, Literary, and Performing Arts* 

7.      15 quarter credits in Individuals and Societies* 

Applicants applying with 45-79 credits:  Same as above, but only 10 credits needed in each of the Areas of Knowledge (Natural World; Visual, Literary and Performing Arts; Individuals and Societies).

See UW Course Equivalency Guide for courses that will fulfill the Areas of Knowledge requirements at individual colleges.

Graduation Requirements

Students pursuing the Interdisciplinary Studies major must complete the following program requirements, in addition to the general graduation requirements of the University, to be eligible for graduation with the Bachelor of Arts degree in Interdisciplinary Studies:

Non-Matrculated Status:  NO CREDITS TAKEN IN NON-MATRICULATED STATUS MAY COUNT TOWARD THE 70 MAJOR CREDITS.

Select one of the following options within the major:

1.     American Studies (AMS)

2.     Community Psychology (CP)

3.     Culture, Literature and the Arts (CLA)

4.     Environmental Studies (ES)  See ES option information for prerequisite and graduation requirements.

5.     Global Studies (GST)

6.     Individualized Study (IS)  

7.     Interdisciplinary Arts (IA)

8.     Science, Technology and Society (STS)   See STS option information for prerequisite requirements.  

9.     Society, Ethics and Human Behavior (SEB)

Complete 70 credits to include the following:

In addition to the 70 credits within the major, complete 20 credits of general electives.

For information on graduation requirements for Individualized Study and Environmental Studies, please refer to the option descriptions listed below. 

Areas of Knowledge:  Within the above-listed 90 credits, a minimum of ten (10) credits each in Visual, Literary and Performing Arts (VLPA); Individuals and Societies (I&S); and Natural World (NW) to be taken in IAS courses (BIS or BES prefix) at the 200, 300, or 400 levels.  Those students admitted with fewer than 15 credits in any or all of the Areas of Knowledge must take enough additional credits in those areas to meet the graduation requirement of 25 credits in each of the Areas of Knowledge.  Multiply-designated courses may not be double-counted as fulfilling two Areas of Knowledge.

200-level Coursework:  Up to 35 credits of 200-level coursework taken at UW Bothell may be applied toward designated requirements within the 90 credits.  Please contact an IAS adviser for details.

NOTE:  Within the 35 credits of CP, students must complete both BIS 312 (Approaches to Social Research) AND BIS 315 (Understanding Statistics) with a minimum grade of 2.0 in each course. 

NOTE: Within the 35 credits of IA, students must complete 15 credits of Art Studios and Workshops.

NOTE: Within the 35 credits of SEB, students must complete at least one of the following courses in research methods at UWB (with a minimum grade of 2.0): BIS 312 (Approaches to Social Research), BIS 315 (Understanding Statistics), or BIS 410 (Topics in Qualitative Inquiry).

NOTE: Within the 35 credits of STS, students must complete BES 301 (Science Methods and Practice) and BIS 315 (Understanding Statistics) with a minimum grade of 2.0 in each course. 

Senior Seminar (BIS 490)

The Interdisciplinary Arts and Sciences faculty is committed to helping students develop their intellectual abilities across the curriculum, especially those required for excellent writing and speaking. The emphasis on writing and speaking across the curriculum, culminating in the senior seminar, represents an added commitment on the part of the faculty and staff to extend and enrich the student's educational experience.   The student's responsibilities for this aspect of the program include:

All senior seminars begin with a mandatory self-assessment of each student's portfolio in consultation with the instructor. Students in a senior seminar are required to complete a major piece of written work. Students must receive a minimum course grade of 2.5 in the senior seminar to graduate.

ES and STE students have the option of completing a senior seminar, the Restoration Ecology Capstone (10 credits over three quarters) or other capstone project (10 credits over two quarters).

Internships:  Students interested in pursuing an Internship should visit our website for application information and requirements.  Questions should be sent to Internship@uwb.edu.

Options

1. American Studies (Classes in this option are offered primarily during daytime hours.)

American Studies (AMS) provides students with the analytical skills and multicultural perspective necessary to understand the cultures of those groups and individuals who live within and across the shifting borders of the United States and the Americas. AMS students may draw on a variety of methods to explore this subject area including history, literature, media and the arts, politics, economics, religion, education, the legal system, and race and gender. Courses in AMS pay particular attention to the values, fears, and myths that emerge in the range of texts that shape Americans and are shaped by them. AMS students engage an exciting range of archival material, including Hollywood films, folklore, music, novels, Web pages, advertisements, poetry, television, print media, personal letters and diaries, drama, government and legal documents, photographs, clothing, architecture, painting, and census records.

AMS graduates may pursue careers in editing, public history, publishing, journalism, diversity training, education, content provision for e-businesses, and other careers that require an in-depth understanding of American culture. AMS also prepares students for advanced study in history, literature, public policy, law, and American studies.

How should a student prepare for this option? While there are no official requirements, students choosing this option will find it helpful to have completed one college course in U.S. history, one in American literature, media, or art, and one in American institutions, policies, or social structures.

American Studies (AMS) Option Courses

Key:** AMS listing dependent upon topic

A.  Introduction to American Studies (AMS core courses)

BIS 363 Conflict and Connection in the Americas

BIS 364 Public Memory and Dissent in American Culture

BIS 365 Exploring American Culture: Popular and Consumer Culture

BIS 366 Exploring American Culture: Americans at the Margins

BIS 367 Exploring American Culture: Race, Ethnicity, and Immigration

BIS 368 Sex, Love, Romance

B.  Methods and Modes of Inquiry

BIS 312 Approaches to Social Research

BIS 410 Topics in Qualitative Inquiry

C.  Literature, Media, and Art in Cultural Context

BIS 204 Introduction to Journalism

BIS 309 History of Dance in Europe and America

BIS 318 Performance, Identity, Community and Everyday Life

BIS 319 Interdisciplinary Arts

BIS 322 **Topics in Performance Studies

BIS 325 Disability and Human Rights

BIS 336 Native American Cultures: The Northwest Coast

BIS 339 **Issues in Global Cultural Studies

BIS 341 **Topics in the Study of Culture

BIS 347 History of American Documentary Film

BIS 349 Hollywood Cinema and Genres

BIS 351 Topics in American Culture

BIS 357 Native American Religious and Philosophical Thought

BIS 360 Literature, Film and Consumer Culture

BIS 361 Studies in American Literature

BIS 370 Nineteenth Century American Literature

BIS 371 Twentieth Century American Literature

BIS 378 Languages of Poetry

BIS 379 American Ethnic Literatures

BIS 383 American Art and Architecture

BIS 384 Literary and Popular Genres

BIS 385 Cross-Cultural Oral Traditions

BIS 387 Women and American Literature

BIS 389 American Indian Literature

BIS 407 Children's Literature and Reader Response Criticism

BIS 418 Masculinity, Homoeroticism, and Queer Theory in America

BIS 451 Northwest Indian Myths and Tales

BIS 455 Literature and Sexuality

BIS 460 **Topics in Critical Theory

BIS 464 ** Topics in Advanced Cinema Studies

BIS 465 Performance, History, Memory

BIS 476 ** Issues in Art History

BIS 481 Modernism, Postmodernism, and American Literature

BIS 484 Arts Learning in the Community

BIS 486 **Studies in Women and Literature

BIS 487 Topics in American Literature

D. Policies, Institutions, and Social Structure

BIS 219 The Politics of Sex Education

BIS 224 Introduction to Feminist Studies

BIS 242 Environmental Geography

BIS 275 Social Problems

BIS 280 U.S. Political Processes

BIS 304 Institutions and Social Change

BIS 305 ** Issues in Social and Political Philosophy

BIS 307 Science, Technology, and Society

BIS 308 ** Issues in Philosophy and Culture

BIS 314 **Topics in Geography

BIS 321 U.S. Politics and Culture from 1865

BIS 323 U.S. Politics and Culture to 1865

BIS 327 History of U.S. Labor Institutions

BIS 330 Democratic Capitalism in the United States

BIS 331 The Family in U.S. Society

BIS 333 The Individual and Society

BIS 335 Human Rights in America

BIS 338 Political Institutions and Processes

BIS 343 Community Psychology

BIS 353 Human Rights in Theory and Practice

BIS 359 Ethics and Society

BIS 362 Contemporary Political Ideas and Ideologies

BIS 369 Women Across Cultures

BIS 391 Environmental History of the Pacific Northwest

BIS 392 Water and Sustainability

BIS 401 **Topics in Economic History and Analysis

BIS 403 Washington DC Seminar on Human Rights

BIS 414 Topics in Human Rights

BIS 415 Public Policy and Law

BIS 419 Urban Politics and Policy

BIS 421 Technology Policy

BIS 425 Topics in United States Social and Political History

BIS 426 Comparative Urban Politics

BIS 431 **Issues in Sexual Politics and Culture

BIS 433 Gender, Work and Family

BIS 436 Comparative Family Systems

BIS 440 **Topics in Everyday Social and Cultural Life

BIS 443 Educational Policy and the American Economy
BIS 444 **Issues in Comparative History

BIS 445 Meanings and Realities of Inequality

BIS 463 U.S. Women's History

BIS 470 Art, Politics, and Social Change

E. Advanced American Studies

BIS 423 The City in American Culture

BIS 424 Topics in American Studies

BIS 461 Studies in U.S. Intellectual and Cultural History

BIS 462 The Culture of the Cold War in America

BIS 467 Post-1945 U.S. Youth Culture

2.  Community Psychology (Classes in this option are offered primarily during daytime hours.)

Community psychology draws on interdisciplinary perspectives and approaches to examine social problems and promote the well-being of people in their communities.  While the field draws heavily from psychology, it also draws from theory and practice in sociology, community development, ecology, public health, anthropology, cultural and performance studies, public policy, social work, and social justice movements.  Through community research and action, community psychologists produce knowledge that can inform social policies, social service work, helping practices, and community change.

The option in Community Psychology will focus on the following interrelated themes:

1) the social, interpersonal, and intrapersonal factors that affect people's well-being and quality of life, 2) human and social problem definition and problem solving, 3) interdisciplinary methods and approaches to community action research, and 4) community intervention strategies and social change.  While there is quite a bit of overlap in the interests of the SEB option and the Community Psychology (CP) option, CP focuses more heavily on the health and well-being of individuals within communities.  SEB focuses more heavily on social institutions, social policies, and ethical issues faced by contemporary societies.  Both options include the theories and research methods of psychology and social science.

The Community Psychology option provides rigorous academic preparation for students who wish to pursue careers in human services, community development mental health, family and youth programs, counseling, prevention, program evaluation, community arts, multicultural program development, and human relations.  The option also prepares students for graduate work in a variety of academic and applied research fields including

Psychology, sociology, counseling, public health, and social work as well as interdisciplinary graduate work in the arts, humanities, and social sciences including cultural studies and policy studies.

How should a student prepare for this option?  There are no formal prerequisites for Community Psychology.  Useful preparation for this option includes coursework in psychology, sociology, anthropology, public policy, statistics and/or research methods.  Students will need strong skills in writing, speaking, collaboration, and community-based work.

Community Psychology (CP) Option Courses:

 Key:** CP listing dependent on topic.

A.  CP Core Course

BIS 343 Community Psychology

B.  Methods Courses

BIS 232 Using, Understanding and Visualizing Quantitative Data

BIS 312 Approaches to Social Research

BIS 315 Understanding Statistics

BIS 410 Topics in Qualitative Inquiry

BIS 447 Topics in Quantitative Inquiry

C.  Community Psychology Courses

BIS 219 The Politics of Sex Education

BIS 220 Developmental Psychology

BIS 223 Introduction to Narrative Ethnography

BIS 225 Applied Social Psychology

BIS 270 Abnormal Psychology

BIS 271 History of Psychology

BIS 275 Social Problems

BIS 304 Institutions and Social Change

BIS 318 Performance, Identity, Community, and Everyday Life

BIS 325 Disability and Human Rights

BIS 331 The Family in U.S. Society

BIS 333 The Individual & Society

BIS 335 Human Rights in America

BIS 337 Risk and Resilience

BIS 348 Cultural Psychology

BIS 359 Ethics and Society

BIS 366 Exploring American Culture: Americans at the Margins

BIS 367 Exploring American Culture: Race, Ethnicity, and Immigration

BIS 369 Women across Cultures

BIS 390 Ecology and the Environment

BIS 430 Social Theory and Practice

BIS 431 Sexual Politics and Cultures

BIS 433 Gender, Work, and Family

BIS 434 Psychology and the Visual Arts

BIS 435 Interactive Learning Theory

BIS 436 Comparative Family Systems

BIS 437 Narrative Psychology

BIS 438 Prevention and Promotion

BIS 445 Meanings and Realities of Inequality

BIS 450 Performance and Healing

BIS 457 Thinking and Decision Making

BIS 484 Arts Learning in the Community

BIS 489 Projects in Community Psychology

D.  Topics

BIS 316 Topics in Psychology

BIS 322 **Topics in Performance Studies

BIS 346 **Topics in Environmental Policy

BIS 414 Topics in Human Rights

BIS 425 **Topics in United States Social and Political History

BIS 440 **Topics in Everyday Cultural and Social Life

BIS 480 **International Study Abroad

3. Culture, Literature, and the Arts

The Culture, Literature and the Arts (CLA) option focuses on how the broadly defined fields of literature and the arts operate within multiple cultures. Students engage in aesthetic, theoretical, and historical methods in order to gain insight into such traditional arts as novels, poetry, dance, and painting as well as such mass-market driven forms as film and advertisement. Close attention is paid to how diverse cultures constitute themselves through different representational practices and beliefs.

The CLA option provides excellent preparation for a range of careers in such fields as education, journalism, publishing, public relations, public service, arts management and museum programs. It also provides a solid foundation for graduate study in a variety of programs in the arts and humanities, including literature, art history, cultural studies, and media studies.

How should a student prepare for this option? Entering students should be able to write an analytical paper and should have at least two courses in literature or the visual arts. Historical knowledge and competency in foreign languages is highly desirable.

Culture, Literature and the Arts (CLA) Option Courses:

Key: ** CLA listing dependent upon topic.

A.  Introduction to Culture, Literature and the Arts (CLA core courses)

BIS 318 Performance, Identity, Community and Everyday Life

BIS 360 Literature, Film and Consumer Culture

BIS 380 Art and Its Context

BIS 384 Literary and Popular Genres

B.  Creative Writing

BIS 207 Introduction to Creative Writing: Words, Stories, Dialogues

BIS 310 Creative Writing: Poetry

BIS 311 Creative Writing: Prose

C.  Art, Film, and Literary Histories

BIS 206 Engaging Literary Arts

BIS 208 Experimenting through the Arts

BIS 209 Engaging Visual Arts

BIS 212 Engaging Performing Arts

BIS 215 Literature into Film

BIS 301 Narrative Forms

BIS 309 History of Dance in Europe and America

BIS 319 Interdisciplinary Arts

BIS 347 History of American Documentary Film

BIS 349 Hollywood Cinema and Genres

BIS 361 Studies in American Literature

BIS 370 Nineteenth Century American Literature

BIS 371 Twentieth Century American Literature

BIS 372 Comparative Arts in 18th Century Europe

BIS 374 Arts Workshop

BIS 376 Circa 1500: Arts of West and East

BIS 378 Languages of Poetry

BIS 379 American Ethnic Literatures

BIS 383 American Art and Architecture

BIS 387 Women and American Literature

BIS 389 American Indian Literature

BIS 407 Children's Literature and Reader Response Criticism

BIS 451 Northwest Indian Myths and Tales

BIS 476 Issues in Art History

BIS 481 Modernism, Postmodernism, and American Literature

BIS 483 Advanced Arts Workshop

BIS 484 Arts Learning in the Community

D.  Thought and Theory

BIS 308 Issues in Philosophy and Culture

BIS 357 Native American Religious and Philosophical Thought

BIS 452 Marx, Nietzsche, Freud

BIS 460 **Topics in Critical Theory

BIS 461 Studies in U.S. Intellectual and Cultural History

E. Culture Studies

BIS 203 History of InterArts

BIS 204 Introduction to Journalism

BIS 205 Technologies of Expression

BIS 222 Travel and Cultural Difference

BIS 223 Introduction to Narrative Ethnography

BIS 260 Introduction to World Religions

BIS 264 Africa on Film

BIS 313 Issues in Media Studies

BIS 314 **Topics in Geography

BIS 317 Language, Society and Cultural Knowledge

BIS 322 Topics in Performance Studies

BIS 325 Disability and Human Rights

BIS 329 **Topics in Mathematics Across the Curriculum

BIS 339 Issues in Global Cultural Studies

BIS 341 Topics in the Study of Culture

BIS 348 Cultural Psychology

BIS 351 Topics in American Culture

BIS 354 Modern European Intellectual History

BIS 364 Public Memory and Dissent in American Culture

BIS 365 Exploring American Culture: Popular and Consumer Culture

BIS 366 Exploring American Culture: Americans at the Margin

BIS 367 Exploring American Culture: Race, Ethnicity, and Immigration

BIS 368 Sex, Love, Romance

BIS 369 Women Across Cultures

BIS 373 Cultural History of Rome

BIS 385 Cross-Cultural Oral Traditions

BIS 417 Paris: The City and Its History

BIS 418 Masculinity, Homoeroticism, and Queer Theory in America

BIS 423 The City in American Culture

BIS 424 Topics in American Studies

BIS 431 **Issues in Sexual Politics and Cultures

BIS 434 Psychology and the Visual Arts

BIS 440 **Topics in Everyday Social and Cultural Life

BIS 450 Performance and Healing

BIS 455 Literature and Sexuality

BIS 462 The Culture of the Cold War in America

BIS 464 Topics in Advanced Cinema Studies

BIS 467 Post 1945 U.S. Youth Culture

BIS 470 Art, Politics, and Social Change

BIS 474 Topics in European Cultural History

BIS 478 Art Patronage and Markets

BIS 480 **International Study Abroad

BIS 486 Studies in Women and Literature

BIS 487 Topics in American Literature

BIS 488 Topics in British Literature

F.  Historical Epochs

BIS 261 World History I

BIS 262 World History II

BIS 263 World History III

BIS 321 U.S. Politics and Culture from 1865

BIS 323 U.S. Politics and Culture to 1865

BIS 326 Twentieth Century Eastern Europe

BIS 400 Modern Japan

BIS 402 Modern China

BIS 404 Twentieth Century Russia

BIS 406 Modern France

BIS 408 Contemporary Britain

BIS 409 Modern Germany

BIS 427 Global History I

BIS 428 Global History II

BIS 429 Global History III

4.  Environmental Studies (Classes in this option are offered primarily during daytime hours.)

The Environmental Studies (ES) option within the Interdisciplinary Studies major is designed for students who want to act critically and creatively in response to the environmental challenges facing the world today.  The option's two pathways (Sustainability and Society [S&S] and Conservation Science and Management [CSM]) share a commitment to educating future practitioners who can address those challenges in their professional careers and personal lives.

ES teaches students to integrate environmental knowledge across the natural and social sciences, as well as the arts and humanities.  Hands-on learning, field experiences, and problem-based instruction focus on finding answers to complex problems that include scientific, social, political, cultural, and ethical dimensions.

Graduating Environmental Studies students develop careers in management, planning, advocacy, communications, and policy-making across a wide array of for-profit and not-for-profit organizations.  They also pursue disciplinary and interdisciplinary graduate education in environmental fields that range across the arts, humanities, and social and natural sciences.

Prerequisites

1. One introductory Chemistry course (BCUSP 142 or equivalent)

2. One introductory Biology course (BES 180 or equivalent)

3. One introductory Earth System Science course (BIS 242 or Geology or Oceanography or Physical Geography or equivalent)

4. One introductory Statistics course (BIS 232 or equivalent.). Students can be admitted to the major without having met this requirement if they enroll in BIS 315 during their junior year.

Graduation Requirements (All 3xx and 4xx courses are under development)

Requirements for both S&S and CSM
BIS 300 Interdisciplinary Inquiry (5)
BES 301 Science Methods & Practice OR BIS 312 Approaches to Social Research (5)
BIS 243 Introduction to Environmental Studies (5)
BES 312 Ecology OR BIS 390 Ecology and the Environment (5)
Political Economy or Environmental Economics (BCUSP 200, BIS 320, 324, 394 or equiv.) (5)
BIS 356 Ethics and the Environment OR BIS 3xx Foundations of Environmental Thought (5)
BIS 490 Senior Seminar or Senior Capstone Experience (5-10)

Sustainability and Society Pathway : Conservation Science and Management Pathway

Pathway Core Requirements
CSMP: BIS 3xx Introduction to GIS (5)
SSP: Sustainability Focus courses: 10 credits
CSMP: BES 485 Conservation Biology (5)

Pathway Distribution Requirements
Lists of courses in each category are shown on the following pages
Environmental Science - 5 credits : Environmental Science - 5 credits
Methods & Practices - 5 credits : Methods & Practices - 5 credits
Society & Environment - 10 credits : Society & Environment - 5 credits
Policy & Management - 5 credits : Policy & Management - 10 credits

Sustainability Focus

Courses in this area directly incorporate substantial knowledge and approaches to the study of sustainability as a major focus of the course.

BIS 240 Introduction to Sustainable Practices

BIS 392 Water & Sustainability

BIS 459 Conservation & Sustainable Development

BIS 3xx Topics in Sustainability

Pathway Distribution Course Lists

The following courses satisfy pathway distribution requirements in the Environmental Studies option. An empty box indicates the course satisfies the distribution requirement for that pathway. A box with an "X" indicates that it does not. Courses taken to fulfill pathway cores and other requirements may not be used to fulfill distribution requirements.


Environmental Science Courses

S&S

CSM

BIS 306

Marine Diversity and Conservation



BIS 396

Nature and the Northwest



BES 311

Environmental Chemistry



BES 362

Introduction to Restoration Ecology



BIS 386

Global Environmental Issues



BES 397

Special Topics in Env. Science



BES 3xx

Evolution



BES 3xx

Environmental Microbiology



BES 3xx

Hydrogeology



BES 430

Air Pollution and Health



BES 460

Water Quality



BES 485

Conservation Biology


X

BES 488

Wetland Ecology



BES 489

Pacific Northwest Ecosystems



BES 490

Pacific  Northwest Plants



BES 4xx

Adv. Topics in Env. Science



BES 4xx            

Adv. Topics in Ecol. and Cons. Biology

X



Methods & Practices Courses

S&S

CSM

BES 302

Environmental Problem Solving


X

BES 316

Ecological Methods



BES 317

Soils Laboratory



BES 303

Env. Monitoring Practicum (3)



BES 3xx

Pacific Northwest Plants



BES 3xx

Science Writing


X

BIS 3xx

Intro. to Geographic Info. Systems


X

BIS 410

Topics in Qualitative Inquiry


X

BES 415

Adv. Env. Meas. Laboratory


X

BES 439

Comp. Model. & Vis. in Env. Sci.


X

BES 460

Water Quality



BES 487

Field Lab Wildland Plants and Soils



BEDUC

493:  Environmental Education


X

BES 4xx

Env. Interpretation



BES 4xx

Field Applications in Env. Science



BES 4xx

Field Applications in GIS




Society & Environment Courses

S&S

CSM

BIS 281

Global Politics



BIS 282

Globalization



BIS 303

History and Globalization



BIS 304

Institutions and Social Change



BIS 320

Comparative Political Economies



BIS 324

International Political Economy



BIS 333

Individual and Society



BIS 353

Human Rights Theory & Practice



BIS 356

Ethics and the Environment



BIS 358

Issues in Environmental Science



BIS 359

Ethics and Society



BIS 362

Contemp. Political Ideas & Ideologies.



BIS 365

Pop. & Consumer Culture


X

BIS 386

Global Environmental Issues



BIS 390

Ecology and the Environment



BIS 391

Env. History of the Pacific Northwest



BIS 392

Water and Sustainability



BIS 394

Comparative Economic Development.



BIS 395

Future Washington



BIS 3xx

Foundations of Env. Thought



BIS 3xx

Eco-arts



BIS 411

Biotechnology and Society



BIS 445

Meanings & Realities of Inequality.



BIS 458

Energy, Environment & Society



BIS 459

Conservation and Sustain. Develop.



BIS 470

Art, Politics and Social Change




Env Policy & Management Courses

S&S

CSM

BIS 338

Political Institutions &Processes



BIS 346

Topics in Environmental Policy



BES 362

Intro. to Restoration Ecology

X


BIS 4xx

Environmental Policy



BIS 415

Public Policy and Law



BIS 419

Urban Politics and Policy



BIS 421

Technology Policy


X

BIS 458

Energy, Env. and Society



BES 485

Conservation Biology


X

BES 486

Watershed Ecol & Management



BPOLST 492

Topics in Policy Research



BIS 4xx or BBUS 4xx

Environmental Management



BIS 4xx

Land Use Planning & Conservation



BIS 4xx

Environmental Impact Assess.



5. GLOBAL STUDIES

Increasingly, it has become imperative for citizens in this country to understand better the complex and disparate global interactions involving trade, politics, immigration, the environment, technology, and culture. The Global Studies (GST) option provides an interdisciplinary, integrative approach to these concerns. Global Studies also permits students to pursue area studies that focus on particular regions of the world, such as Asia or Europe, human rights, political economy and cultural studies. International study opportunities enhance student participation in this option.

GST graduates may pursue careers in government, law, non-profit organizations, communications, businesses dealing with global markets, journalism and information industries of all kinds. In addition, students will be prepared to pursue graduate work in international studies, law, business, history, and political science among other areas.

How should a student prepare for this option? There are no formal prerequisites for Global Studies. It is recommended that students who wish to pursue the Global Studies option take as many introductory courses in economics, political science, geography, history, art history, foreign language, or anthropology as possible.

Global Studies (GST) Option Courses:

Key:** GST listing dependent on topic.

A.  GST Core Courses

BIS 303 History and Globalization

BIS 324 International Political Economy

BIS 362 Contemporary Political Ideas and Ideologies

B.  Skills Courses

BIS 232 Using, Understanding and Visualizing Quantitative Data

BIS 230 Mathematical Thinking for the Liberal Arts

BIS 312 Approaches to Social Research

BIS 315 Understanding Statistics

BIS 410 Topics in Qualitative Inquiry

BIS 447 Topics in Quantitative Inquiry

C.  GST Courses

BIS 222 Travel and Cultural Difference

BIS 224 Introduction to Feminist Studies

BIS 242 Environmental Geography

BIS 243 Introduction to Environmental Issues

BIS 260 Introduction to World Religions

BIS 261 World History I

BIS 262 World History II

BIS 263 World History III

BIS 264 Africa on Film

BIS 280 U.S. Political Processes

BIS 281 Global Politics

BIS 282 Globalization

BIS 304 Institutions and Social Change

BIS 305 **Issues in Social and Political Philosophy

BIS 307 Science, Technology, and Society

BIS 308 **Issues in Philosophy and Culture

BIS 309 History of Dance in Europe and America

BIS 313 Issues in Media Studies

BIS 314 **Topics in Geography

BIS 317 Language, Society and Cultural Knowledge

BIS 318 Performance, Identity, Community and Everyday Life

BIS 320 Comparative Political Economies

BIS 322 **Topics in Performance Studies

BIS 325 Disability and Human Rights

BIS 326 Twentieth Century Eastern Europe

BIS 328 Contemporary European Politics

BIS 329 **Topics in Mathematics Across the Curriculum

BIS 330 Democratic Capitalism in the United States

BIS 332 The Rise of East Asia

BIS 334 Traditional Chinese History

BIS 339 Issues in Global Cultural Studies

BIS 344 International Relations

BIS 353 Human Rights in Theory and Practice

BIS 354 Modern European Intellectual History

BIS 355 History of Science and Technology

BIS 358 Issues in Environmental Science

BIS 363 Conflict and Connections in the Americas

BIS 367 Exploring American Cultures: Race, Ethnicity and Immigration

BIS 369 Women Across Cultures

BIS 372 Comparative Arts in 18th Century Europe

BIS 373 Cultural History of Rome

BIS 376 Circa 1500: Arts of West and East

BIS 380 Art and Its Context

BIS 385 Cross-Cultural Oral Traditions

BIS 386 Global Environmental Issues

BIS 392 Water and Sustainability

BIS 394 Comparative Economic Development

BIS 400 Modern Japan

BIS 401 **Topics in Economic History and Analysis

BIS 402 Modern China

BIS 403 Washington D.C. Seminar on Human Rights

BIS 404 Twentieth Century Russia

BIS 406 Modern France

BIS 408 Contemporary Britain

BIS 409 Modern Germany

BIS 412 Ideas in Political Economy

BIS 413 Nations and Nationalism

BIS 414 Topics in Human Rights

BIS 416 Problems in International Political Economy

BIS 417 Paris: The City and Its History

BIS 420 Colonizing History in Sub-Saharan Africa

BIS 426 Comparative Urban Politics

BIS 427 Global History I

BIS 428 Global History II

BIS 429 Global History III

BIS 430 Social Theory and Practice

BIS 431 **Issues in Sexual Politics and Cultures

BIS 432 Democracy in Asia

BIS 436 Comparative Family Systems

BIS 440 **Topics in Everyday Social and Cultural Life

BIS 441 Global Labor Markets

BIS 444 **Issues in Comparative History

BIS 459 Conservation and Sustainable Development

BIS 460 **Topics in Critical Theory

BIS 465 Performance, History, Memory

BIS 470 Art, Politics and Social Change

BIS 474 **Topics in European Cultural History

BIS 476 **Issues in Art History

BIS 478 Art Patronage and Markets

BIS 480  International Study Abroad

BIS 486 **Studies in Women and Literature

6. Individualized Study

The Individualized Study (IS) option is designed for highly-motivated students who want to create their own course of study.  IS students work closely with one or more faculty mentors in IAS or other programs at UWB as they shape a degree suited to their intellectual and professional interests and ambitions. 

The IS option allows students to create degree options in subjects ranging from science communication and environmental education to gender studies and digital arts.  The resulting student-driven curriculum includes formal and informal meetings between students and their faculty mentors, along with a portfolio-based process of self-reflection on the learning as it evolves.  Students interested in pursuing the Individualized Study option work with a faculty member to develop a substantive proposal.  This proposal is then reviewed by a faculty oversight committee.  Once approved, requirements vary from proposal to proposal.

Graduating IS students develop careers and pursue graduate education in a wide variety of fields, depending on their chosen area of study.  As important, they gain experience and document success in one of the crucial predictors of success in any of those fields: the ability to undertake a self-directed project in collaboration with others, to reflect critically on its development in process, and to complete it in a timely fashion.

            Standard UW and IAS degree requirements including BIS 300, the senior seminar, and areas of knowledge, remain in effect, as they do for all other IAS degree options and majors, with a total of 180 credits required for graduation. 

7.  Interdisciplinary Arts (Classes in this option are offered primarily during daytime hours.)

            The Interdisciplinary Arts (IA) option is designed for students who want to create art and to learn about the world through the creative arts.  It links written, visual, media, and performance arts, and explores meaning and potential arts making across diverse social and cultural settings.

            Coursework includes studios, workshops, seminars, and community-based projects.  The flexible curriculum enables students to hone their skills as arts practitioners while drawing connections to cultural and media studies, environmental and disability issues, health and policy arenas, and community and educational development.

            IA graduates become independent artists, build careers in arts and cultural industries as curators and administrators, and develop arts-based projects in a range of employment sectors, including health, media, and education.  They are also prepared for graduate education in the arts and humanities, cultural studies, and Master of Fine Arts fields. 

            How should a student prepare for this option?  There are no formal prerequisites for Interdisciplinary Arts.  Useful preparation for this option includes formal and informal training in visual, written, digital, and/or performing arts.  Students will need strong skills in collaborative and creative problem-solving.

Interdisciplinary Arts (IA) Option Courses:

Key:** IA listing dependent on topic

A.  IA Core Course

BIS 319 Interdisciplinary Arts

B.  Art Studios and Art Workshops

BIS 207 Introduction to Creative Writing: Words, Stories, Dialogues

BIS 213 Art Techniques (Pending Approval)

BIS 310 Creative Writing: Poetry

BIS 311 Creative Writing: Prose

BIS 322 Topics in Performance Studies: Garbage as Art

BIS 374 Arts Workshop (Pending Approval)

BIS 450 Performance and Healing

BIS 483 Advanced Arts Workshop (Pending Approval)

BIS 484 Arts Learning in the Community (Pending Approval)

C. IA Option Courses:

BIS 203 History of InterArts

BIS 212 Engaging Performing Arts

BIS 207 Engaging Literary Arts

BIS 209 Engaging Visual Arts

BIS 208 Experimenting With the Arts

BIS 301 Narrative Forms

BIS 309 History of Dance in Europe and America

BIS 318 Performance, Identity, Community, and Everyday Life

BIS 322 **Topics in Performance Studies

BIS 341 **Topics in the Study of Culture

BIS 348 Cultural Psychology

BIS 366 Exploring American Culture: Americans at the Margins

BIS 367 Exploring American Culture: Race, Ethnicity, and Immigration

BIS 369 Women across Cultures

BIS 372 Comparative Arts in Eighteenth-Century Europe

BIS 373 The Cultural History of Rome

BIS 376 Circa 1500:  Arts of West and East

BIS 378 Languages of Poetry

BIS 380 Art and its Context

BIS 382 Visual Arts of Biology

BIS 383 American Art and Architecture

BIS 384 Literature and Popular Genres

BIS 410 Qualitative Inquiry:  Visual Ethnography

BIS 417 Paris:The City and its History

BIS 431 Sexual Politics and Cultures

BIS 434 Psychology and the Visual Arts

BIS 435 Interactive Learning: Theory and Practice

BIS 440 **Topics in Everyday Cultural and Social Life

BIS 450 Performance and Healing

BIS 457 Thinking and Decision Making

BIS 460 Topics in Critical Theory

BIS 470 Art, Politics, and Social Change

BIS 474 Topics in European Cultural History

BIS 476 Issues in Art History

BIS 478 Art Patronage and Markets

BIS 486 Studies in Women and Literature

8. Science, Technology, and Society

How have the fields of science and technology evolved over time, and what does the future hold?  How should societies manage those fields to achieve just and sustainable communities?  The Science, Technology and Society (STS) option within the Interdisciplinary Studies major prepares students to address these important questions through an integrated approach to science, technology, and their relationships to culture, history, and society.

STS students work with faculty members trained in disciplines ranging from biology and mathematics to political economy and philosophy.  Housed in Interdisciplinary Arts and Sciences, the degree option enables students to develop their skills in scientific and technological research along with their capacities for critical, creative, and ethical reflection.  Students leave the program with the capacity to make informed decisions about the responsible use of science and technology -- as professionals and citizens.

Graduating STS students are prepared for careers with a wide variety of for-profit, not-for-profit, and governmental organizations that analyze, produce, and use scientific and technical knowledge.  These careers include planning and administration, public and investor relations, and advocacy and communications, among other areas.  STS students also pursue graduate and professional education in such fields as law, education, policy studies, and media and cultural studies.

Lower Division Prerequisites

1. Two quarters of a 100 or 200-level science sequence, which may be two courses from the same sequence or the first course from any two different sequences, as below:

* BIS 250 and 251 (How Things Work) are recommended to satisfy this requirement.

* Alternatively, students may take BES 180 and 200 (Introductory Biology) or their equivalents; BCUSP 142 and 152 (General Chemistry) or their equivalents; or BCUSP 143 and 144 (General Physics) or their equivalents.

* Other science courses may be accepted if they have a laboratory component and are designed for students expecting to major in the science field in which the sequence is offered.

2.BCUSP 123 (Functions, Models, and Quantitative Reasoning) or Pre-Calculus.

 Science, Technology and Society (STS) Option Courses (All 3xx and 4xx courses are under development.)

Key:** STS listing dependent on topic.

A.  STS Core Course

BIS 307 Science, Technology and Society

B.  STS Methods Course

BES 301 Science Methods and Practice

BIS 315 Understanding Statistics

C.  STS Courses. . 

Mathematical Sciences

BIS 230 Mathematical Thinking for the Liberal Arts

BIS 231 Linear Algebra with Applications

BIS 232 Using, Understanding, and Visualizing Quantitative Data

BIS 329 Topics in Mathematics Across the Curriculum

BIS 350 Concept of Number

BIS 447 Topics in Quantitative Inquiry

BIS 480 **International Study Abroad

BIS 4xx Mathematical Systems

Natural Sciences

BES 220 Introduction to Biology III

BES 302 Environmental Problem Solving

BES 311 Environmental Chemistry

BES 315 Environmental Chemistry Lab

BES 312 Ecology

BES 316 Ecological Methods

BES 317 Soils Laboratory

BES 362 Introduction to Restoration Ecology

BES 397 Special Topics in Environmental Science

BES 3xx Evolution

BES 3xx Environmental Microbiology

BES 3xx Hydrogeology

BES 430 Air Pollution and Health

BES 460 Water Quality

BES 485 Conservation Biology

BES 486 Watershed Ecology & Management

BES 488 Wetland Ecology

BES 489 Pacific Northwest Ecosystems

BES 490 Pacific Northwest Plants

BES 4xx Advanced Topics in Environmental Science

BES 4xx Advanced Topics in Ecology and Conservation Biology

BES 4xx Field Application in GIS

BES 4xx Field Application in Environmental Science

BIS 240 Introduction to Sustainable Practices

BIS 242 Environmental Geography

BIS 250 How Things Work: Motion & Mechanics (if not used to meet prerequisite)

BIS 251 How Things Work: Electricity & Invention (if not used to meet prerequisite)

BIS 2xx Contemporary Issues in Physics

BIS 306 Marine Diversity and Conservation

BIS 358 Issues in Environmental Science

BIS 381 History of Life

BIS 386 Global Environmental Issues

BIS 388 Philosophy and Science of Quantum Mechanics

BIS 390 Ecology and the Environment

BIS 4xx Issues in Physical Systems

3.  Science Communications

BES 3xx Science Writing

BES 4xx Representations of Science in the Media

BIS 202 Critical Reasoning

BIS 205 Technologies of Expression

BIS 204 Introduction to Journalism

BIS 317 Language, Society, and Cultural Knowledge

BIS 318 Performance, Identity, Community, and Everyday Life

BIS 322 **Topics in Performance Studies

BIS 360 Literature, Film and Consumer Culture

BIS 382 Visual Art of Biology

BIS 3xx Physics and Art

BIS 3xx Eco-arts

4. Culture, Politics, and Society

BIS 219 Politics of Sex Education

BIS 243 Introduction to Environmental Issues

BIS 281 Global Politics

BIS 302 Issues in Mathematics Across Cultures

BIS 303 History and Globalization

BIS 346 Topics in Environmental Policy

BIS 355 History of Science and Technology

BIS 356 Ethics and the Environment

BIS 359 Ethics and Society

BIS 386 Global Environmental Issues

BIS 391 Environmental History of the Pacific Northwest Bioregion

BIS 392 Water and Sustainability

BIS 394 Comparative Economic Development

BIS 3xx Topics in Sustainability

BIS 411 Biotechnology and Society

BIS 421 Science and Technology Policy

BIS 443 Educational Policy and the American Economy

BIS 458 Energy, the Environment, and Society

BIS 459 Conservation and Sustainable Development

BIS 482 Problems in Interdisciplinary Science

BIS 4xx Comparative Bioethics

BIS 4xx Environmental Policy

BIS 4xx or BBUS 4xx Environmental Management

Select courses outside of IAS may also be taken to fulfill the option course requirement.  Please contact iasadvisers@uwb.edu for details.          

9. Society, Ethics, and Human Behavior

Society, Ethics and Human Behavior (SEB) establishes the perspectives and develops the tools essential to an understanding of individual behavior, of human institutions, and of social policies. SEB studies combine an understanding of the ethical dimensions inherent in social and individual action along with analysis in multiple disciplines, including sociology, psychology, economics, philosophy, political science, and the law. The faculty is committed to providing students with experiences that include direct observation, involvement, and influence in and upon the agencies on the front-line of societal problems.

Many students who graduate with the SEB option may pursue careers or advanced study in counseling, education, human resources, law, social work, public policy, management, or planning. This option prepares students to assume more active and informed responsibilities within their communities, their families, and the organizations in which they work and participate.

How should a student prepare for this option? Fulfillment of the goals set by the option in Society, Ethics and Human Behavior requires rigorous qualitative (e.g., case studies) and quantitative study of human behavior. This course of study also requires strong skills in writing, speaking, and collaborative work. Useful preparation for this option includes a working knowledge of statistics as well as substantial coursework in psychology, sociology, communications and/or philosophy.

Society, Ethics and Human Behavior (SEB) Option Courses:

Key: **SEB listing dependent on topic.

A.  SEB Core Courses

BIS 304 Institutions and Social Change

BIS 331 The Family in U.S. Society

BIS 333 The Individual and Society

BIS 359 Ethics and Society 

B.  Methods and Modes of Inquiry

BIS 312 Approaches to Social Research

BIS 315 Statistics

BIS 410 Topics in Qualitative Inquiry 

C.  Individual Behavior

BIS 220 Developmental Psychology

BIS 225 Applied Social Psychology

BIS 270 Abnormal Psychology

BIS 271 History of Psychology

BIS 316 Topics in Psychology

BIS 337 Risk and Resilience

BIS 343 Community Psychology

BIS 348 Cultural Psychology

BIS 434 Psychology and the Visual Arts

BIS 437 Narrative Psychology

BIS 438 Prevention and Promotion

BIS 457 Thinking and Decision Making

BIS 489 Projects in Community Psychology

D. Institutions

BIS 280 U.S. Political Processes

BIS 281 Global Politics

BIS 282 Globalization

BIS 313 Issues in Media Studies

BIS 321 U.S. Politics and Culture from 1865

BIS 323 U.S. Politics and Culture to 1865

BIS 327 History of U.S. Labor Institutions

BIS 330 Democratic Capitalism in the United States

BIS 338 Political Institutions and Processes

BIS 401 **Topics in Economic History and Analysis

BIS 433 Gender, Work and Family

BIS 436 Comparative Family Systems

BIS 441 Global Labor Markets

E.  Social Policy and Social Justice

BIS 219 The Politics of Sex Education

BIS 224 Introduction to Feminist Studies

BIS 240 Sustainable Practices

BIS 243 Introduction to Environmental Issues

BIS 275 Social Problems

BIS 307 Science, Technology, and Society

BIS 325 Disability and Human Rights

BIS 328 Contemporary European Politics

BIS 335 Human Rights in America

BIS 346 Topics in Environmental Policy

BIS 353 Human Rights in Theory and Practice

BIS 392 Water and Sustainability

BIS 394 Comparative Economic Development

BIS 403 Washington DC Seminar on Human Rights

BIS 414 Topics in Human Rights

BIS 415 Public Policy and the Law

BIS 419 Urban Politics and Policy

BIS 420 Colonizing History in Sub-Saharan Africa

BIS 421 Technology Policy

BIS 425 Topics in United States Social and Political History

BIS 426 Comparative Urban Politics

BIS 432 Democracy in Asia

BIS 443 Educational Policy and the American Economy

BIS 444 **Issues in Comparative History

BIS 445 Meanings and Realities of Inequality

BIS 458 Energy, the Environment and Society

F.  Culture and Society

BIS 204 Introduction to Journalism

BIS 205 Technologies of Expression

BIS 221 Gender and Sexuality

BIS 222 Travel and Cultural Difference

BIS 223 Introduction to Narrative Ethnography

BIS 242 Environmental Geography

BIS 250 How Things Work: Motions and Mechanics

BIS 251 How Things Work: Electricity and Invention

BIS 261 World History I

BIS 262 World History II

BIS 263 World History III

BIS 264 Africa on Film

BIS 302 Issues in Mathematics Across Cultures

BIS 314 **Topics in Geography

BIS 317 Language, Society and Cultural Knowledge

BIS 318 Performance, Identity, Community and Everyday Life

BIS 322 **Topics in Performance

BIS 329 **Topics in Mathematics Across the Curriculum

BIS 336 Native American Cultures: the Northwest Coast

BIS 339 **Issues in Global Cultural Studies

BIS 341 **Topics in the Study of Culture

BIS 360 Literature, Film and Consumer Culture

BIS 364 Public Memory and Dissent in American Culture

BIS 365 Exploring American Culture: Popular and Consumer Culture

BIS 367 Exploring American Culture: Race, Ethnicity and Immigration

BIS 368 Sex, Love, Romance

BIS 369 Women Across Cultures

BIS 382 The Visual Art of Biology

BIS 391 Environmental History of the Pacific Northwest

BIS 418 Masculinity, Homoeroticism and Queer Theory in America

BIS 431 Issues in Sexual Politics and Cultures

BIS 440 **Topics in Everyday Social and Cultural Life

BIS 450 Performance and Healing

BIS 455 Literature and Sexuality

BIS 463 U.S. Women's History

BIS 470 Art, Politics and Social Change

BIS 484 Arts Learning in the Community

G.  Ethics, Philosophy and Social Theory

BIS 260 Introduction to World Religions

BIS 305 Issues in Social and Political Philosophy

BIS 308 Issues in Philosophy and Culture

BIS 354 Modern European Intellectual History

BIS 355 History of Science and Technology

BIS 356 Ethics and the Environment

BIS 357 Native American Religious and Philosophical Thought

BIS 362 Contemporary Political Ideas and Ideologies

BIS 411 Biotechnology and Society

BIS 412 Ideas in Political Economy

BIS 430 Social Theory and Practice

BIS 435 Interactive Learning Theory

BIS 452 Marx, Nietzsche, Freud

BIS 460 **Topics in Critical Theory

H.  Area Studies

BIS 326 Twentieth Century Eastern Europe

BIS 400 Modern Japan

BIS 402 Modern China

BIS 404 Twentieth Century Russia

BIS 406 Modern France

BIS 408 Contemporary Britain

BIS 409 Modern Germany

BIS 480 **Study Abroad

Minor in Human Rights
See our web site                         

Minor in Policy Studies

The Policy Studies minor in the IAS program at the University of Washington, Bothell, is designed to provide students with the analytical foundations they will need to understand policy formation, implementation, and evaluation.  It will serve as excellent preparation for graduate work in applied and academic research fields such as Policy Studies, Public Health, Urban Planning, and Political Science.

Students are advised to pursue minor course work early in their studies to ensure enough time to meet course requirements.  Not all courses listed below are offered on a regular basis.  Students must complete the following requirements for a minor in Policy Studies (30 credits):

Common Core (20 credits)

Microeconomics (prerequisite class to be completed at the 200 level.

BIS 324  International Political Economy

BIS 338  Political Institutions and Processes

BIS 315  Understanding Statistics

Methods (5 credits)

BIS 312 Approaches to Social Research OR BES 301 Science Methods and Practice

Elective (5 credits) from the following list of 400-level policy-oriented courses:

BIS 403/490 Washington DC Seminar on Human Rights

BIS 414  Topics in Human Rights

BIS 415  Public Policy and law

BIS 419  Urban Politics and Policy

BIS 421  Technology Policy

BIS 443  Educational Policy and the American Economy

BIS 458  Energy, Environment and Society

Other appropriate policy area courses by approval including BPOLST 492 (Topics in Policy Research)

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE

            The Bachelor of Science in Environmental Science prepares students to address environmental challenges facing the world today.  Environmental Science students in each of the major's two degree pathways, Conservation and Restoration Ecology (CRE) and Earth System Science (ESS), develop the depth of scientific understanding, interdisciplinary perspectives, and creative problem-solving skills needed to design and bring about solutions to these problems at local, regional, and global scales.

            The major combines focused study in the natural sciences with a broadly interdisciplinary curriculum, highlighting the ethical, historical, and policy dimensions of environmental issues.  By participating in community-based projects ranging from wetlands restoration and conservation planning to analyses of regional air and water pollution, students gain practical experience and make a positive difference while they are still in school.

            Career opportunities for Environmental Science students include management, planning, advocacy, communications, and policy-making related to natural science research, environmental protection, and sustainable development.  Students are prepared for graduate education in a range of natural and environmental science fields.  

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS

NOTE: IAS conducts a holistic review of all applications.  A 2.5 minimum cumulative gpa is expected.  Special circumstances may allow for admission of students with lower cumulative gpas (between 2.0 and 2.4).

Applicants applying with 80 or more credits:

1.      3 years high school math (2 years algebra) or Intermediate algebra in college. Minimum grade of 2.0 if taken in college.

2.      Two years (high school) OR 10 quarter credits (college) of a single foreign language or through 102 with a passing grade.

3.      English Composition (Five quarter credits), 10 credits preferred to include a writing and research course.

4.      Quantitative/Symbolic Reasoning (Five quarter credits in Math or Logic). Does not apply to students who enrolled in college for the first time prior to Autumn Quarter, 1985.

5.      15 quarter credits in Natural World*

6.      15 quarter credits in Visual, Literary, and Performing Arts*

7.      15 quarter credits in Individuals and Societies*

Applicants applying with 45-79 credits:  Same as above, but only 10 credits needed in each of the Areas of Knowledge (Natural World; Visual, Literary and Performing Arts; Individuals and Societies).

See UW Course Equivalency Guide for courses that will fulfill the Areas of Knowledge requirements at individual colleges.

PREREQUISITES FOR BOTH PATHWAYS:

One quarter of Calculus (BCUSP 124 or equivalent)

Three quarter General Chemistry sequence (BCUSP 142, 152, 162 or equivalent)

One introductory Earth System Science course (BIS 242 or Physical Geography or Oceanography or equivalent)

One introductory Environmental Studies course (BIS 240 or BIS 243 or equivalent)

Additional Prerequisite for the CRE Pathway:

Three quarter introductory Biology sequence (BES 180, 200, 220 or equivalent)

Additional Prerequisites for the ESS Pathway:

One quarter of introductory Biology (BES 180 or equivalent)

One quarter introductory Physics

A second quarter of introductory Physics (or a second quarter of Calculus (BCUSP 125 or equivalent)

Graduation Requirements

Students pursuing the Environmental Science major must complete the following program requirements, in addition to the general graduation requirements of the University, to be eligible for graduation with the Bachelor of Science degree in Environmental Science:

NON-MATRICULATED STATUS:  NO CREDITS TAKEN IN NON-MATRICULATED STATUS MAY COUNT TOWARD THE 78 MAJOR CREDITS.

GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS FOR BOTH THE CRE AND ESS PATHWAYS (All 3xx and 4xx courses are under development):

BIS 300 Interdisciplinary Inquiry (5)
BIS 301 Science Methods & Practice (5)
BIS 315 Understanding Statistics (5)
BES 312 Ecology (5)
BES 303 Environmental Monitoring Practicum (3)
BES 3xx Introduction to GIS OR BES 439 Computer Modeling & Visualization in Environmental Science (5)
BES Capstone or approved Independent Research (10)

CONSERVATION AND RESTORATION ECOLOGY PATHWAY : EARTH SYSTEM SCIENCE

Pathway Core Course Requirements
CREP: BES 316 Ecological Methods (5)
ESS: BES 311 Environmental Chemistry (5)
CREP: BES 362 Introduction to Restoration Ecology (5)
ESS: BES 315 Environmental Chemistry Lab (5)
CREP: BES 485 Conservation Biology (5)
CREP: BES 3xx Hydrogeology (5)
ESS: BES 311 Environ. Chemistry (5) OR
CREP: BES 3xx Hydrogeology (5)

Pathway Distribution Requirements (See below for courses that satisfy pathway requirements)

Environmental Science (5) : Environmental Science (5)
Methods and Practices (5) : Methods and Practices (10)
Society and Environment (5) : Society and Environment (5)
Environmental Policy and Management (5) : Environmental Policy and Management (5)

General Electives (12 credits)

            NOTE:  Within the credits taken in the IAS curriculum , students must complete 10 credits each in Visual, Literary and Performing Arts (VLPA); Individuals & Societies (I&S); and Natural World (NW).

            The following courses satisfy distribution requirements in the Bachelor of Science in Environmental Science.  An open box indicates the course satisfies the distribution requirement for that pathway.  A box with an "X" indicates that it does not.  Courses are 5 credits unless indicated otherwise in parentheses.  Courses taken to fulfill pathway cores may not be used to fulfill distribution requirements.

Environmental Science Courses

CRE Pathway

ESS Pathway

BIS 306 Marine Diversity and Conservation



BIS 396 Nature and the Northwest



BES 311 Environmental Chemistry


X

BES 362 Introduction to Restoration Ecology

X


BES 397 Special Topics in Environmental Science



BES xxx Evolution



BES 3xx Environmental Microbiology



BES 3xx Hydrogeology


X

BES 430 Air Pollution and Health



BES 460 Water Quality



BES 485 Conservation Biology

X


BES 488 Wetland Ecology



BES 4xx Advanced Topics in Environmental Science



BES 489 Pacific Northwest Ecosystems



BES 490 Pacific Northwest Plants



Methods and Practices Courses

CRE Pathway

ESS Pathway

BIS 232 Using, Understanding & Visualizing Quantitative Data



BES 302 Environmental Problem Solving



BES 315 Environmental Chemistry Lab


X

BES 316 Ecological Methods

X


BES 317 Soils Laboratory



BES 3xx Science Writing



BES 3xx Introduction to Geographic Information Systems



BES 4xx Field Applications in Environmental Science



BES 415 Advanced Environmental Measurements Laboratory



BES 439 Computer Modeling & Visualization in Environmental Science



BES 487 Field lab in Wildland Plants and Soils



BES 4xx Field Applications in GIS



Society and Environment Courses

CRE Pathway

ESS Pathway

BIS 356 Ethics and the Environment



BIS 358 Issues in Environmental Science



BIS 386 Global Environmental Issues



BIS 390 Ecology and the Environment



BIS 391 Environmental History of the Pacific Northwest



BIS 392 Water and Sustainability



BIS 395 Future Washington



BIS 3xx Topics in Environmental Studies



BIS 3xx Topics in Sustainability



BIS 411 Biotechnology and Society



BIS 458 Energy, Environment & Society



BIS 459 Conservation and Sustainable Development



Environmental Policy & Management Courses

CRE Pathway

ESS Pathway

BIS 346 Topics in Environmental Policy



BIS 3xx  Environmental Policy



BES 486 Watershed Ecology and Management



BIS 4xx  Land Use Planning & Conservation



BIS 4xx  Environmental Management



BIS 4xx or  BBUS 4xx Environmental Management