Workshops

Workshop Sessions from the 2013 ULC

Check back soon for the 2014 Workshop Sessions

 

Unpacking the Discourse of Community in Social Justice Circles

Kaelyn Caldwell & Karen Terrado, University of Washington Bothell

9:30 – 11:45 A.M., Mobius Hall

Social Justice and Activism

The word “community” is used so often in social justice and activist circles that sometimes it loses its meaning altogether.  Additionally, “community” can be used in ways that are implicitly coded to mean marginalized communities, communities of color, or poor communities.  What happens when people who want to create social change do not envision that they are a part of the communities with which they work?  What happens when an outsider comes into a community you identify with and imposes their vision for “community” change without being accountable to the people who are most impacted by said visions?  How can we understand our own personal and complicated relationship to “community” and why does it matter?  This workshop aims to work with participants to explore these questions by drawing from lived experiences.

 

Negotiating through the Funk:  Using the tool of Racial Identity Development

Anthony Kelley & Sacha Nunn,  University of Washington Bothell

9:30 – 11:45 AM,  CC3 – 103

Ethnic, Racial, and Cultural Sensitivity

We as a blended community have to acknowledge both our historical significance and trauma that connects us. If we consider institutions that encourage the blending of our various communities like universities, we need practices that enable us to negotiate through the inevitable conflicts to arise. This workshop draws from a specific practice model that allows for communities to deal with the complexities of race and identity.

 

GLEE Project: A multimedia story presentation by refugee youth

Elizabeth Norville & Laura Adriance, World Affairs Council

9:30AM – 10:30AM, CC3 - 235

Social Justice and Activism:

We invite our audience to watch short, personal video-narratives created by local refugee youth, and to explore key themes about the refugee experience with the filmmakers themselves. Our workshop promises to generate a better understanding of the hurdles faced by foreign students, and expand your horizons about global affairs.

 

Teamwork Facilitation – Building a Team

Matthew Bennett, Liam Munro & Rianna Hicks,  University of Washington Bothell

9:30AM – 10:30AM, CC3 - 121

Personal Leadership Development:

A presentation on team facilitation and building strategies.  First the audience will be gathered in groups to participate in team building exercises.  The next portion will be a led group discussion and reflection on the experience.  The last portion will be a presentation/discussion about team building strategies involving everyone.

 

What We Learn from Disney

KC Bui,  University of Washington Bothell

9:30AM – 10:30AM, CC3 - 123

Ethnic, Racial & Cultural Sensitivity:

Did you grow up watching Disney movies? What did you learn from these movies? This workshop will help you recognize the messages you learned from Disney and how it affects your actions and perception today.

 

Hip-Hop Culture & Leadership: Identifying Problems & Creating Solutions

Jose S. Gutierrez Jr., The Edutainment Academy & Institute

9:30AM – 10:30AM, CC3 - 221

Personal Leadership & Development

Hip-Hop culture and leadership are phenomena which defy reason.  Birthed from the most poverty-stricken communities in the United States, Hip-Hop culture was inspired by unexpected leadership and continues to lead our youth culturally.  But in which direction?  And who is directing?

 

Avoiding Burnout: The Healthy Toolbox for Leaders

Adriana Cristina Arghira, Shauniece Drayton, Shane Katherison, and Laura Binczewski

University of Washington Bothell - Health Educators Reaching Out (HEROS)

9:30AM – 10:30AM, CC3 – 223

Personal Leadership Development

This workshop is here to provide students with a toolbox for healthy tips and methods of surviving as a leader, through several wellness area approaches: avoiding burnout. The workshop will include ways of handling stress through mental health activities, tying in how food and emotions work quick energy boost methods and a meditation session.

Hungry in Higher Ed: Starting a Campus Food Pantry

Sophia Mantheakis, Southern Oregon University

10:45AM – 11:45AM,  CC3 – 235

Social Justice and Activism

Oregon is one of 5 states with more than 20% of the population receiving federal food assistance, as well as distributing millions of emergency food boxes statewide to individuals and families in need. Considering the high incidence of food insecurity and the rising cost of higher education, the Civic Engagement Program at Southern Oregon University and their AmeriCorps VISTA member wanted to research the need for a food pantry to serve students emergency food supplies due to the student population being largely nontraditional and low income. Following in the footsteps of dozens of universities and community colleges nationwide, the Civic Engagement Program surveyed student food insecurity, researched food security programs, and developed a food pantry on campus to serve currently enrolled students. This workshop covers our research, development, and progress and provides interactive discussion and best practices for developing food security programs in a higher education setting.

 

Where I'm From: Personal Story as a Leadership Tool

Renata Cummings, South Seattle Community College

10:45AM – 11:45AM, CC3 – 121

Cross-Cultural Communication and Skills

“Where I’m From” is a writing exercise developed by George Ella Lyon. In this workshop, participants will write, share, and be challenged to think critically. Topics of diversity and social justice will be explored. Participants should come prepared to share, to listen, and to learn from each other.

 

Resume and LinkedIn

Kim Wilson, University of Washington Bothell

Room:  CC3 – 123

Time:  CC3 – 123, 10:45AM – 11:45AM

Hip-Hop Culture & Leadership: Identifying Problems & Creating Solutions

Jose S. Gutierrez Jr., The Edutainment Academy & Institute

9:30AM – 10:30AM, CC3 - 221

Personal Leadership & Development

Hip-Hop culture and leadership are phenomena which defy reason.  Birthed from the most poverty-stricken communities in the United States, Hip-Hop culture was inspired by unexpected leadership and continues to lead our youth culturally.  But in which direction?  And who is directing?

 

What We Learn from Disney

KC Bui,  University of Washington Bothell

10:45 – 11:40AM, CC3 - 123

Ethnic, Racial & Cultural Sensitivity:

Did you grow up watching Disney movies? What did you learn from these movies? This workshop will help you recognize the messages you learned from Disney and how it affects your actions and perception today.

Where I'm From: Personal Story as a Leadership Tool

Renata Cummings, South Seattle Community College

1:00 – 2:00PM, CC3 – 121

Cross-Cultural Communication and Skills

“Where I’m From” is a writing exercise developed by George Ella Lyon. In this workshop, participants will write, share, and be challenged to think critically. Topics of diversity and social justice will be explored. Participants should come prepared to share, to listen, and to learn from each other.

 

Empowering University Students to Impact Global Health and Sustainable Development

Steven Atamian, Vanessa Lopez & Cole Hoover,  Global Brigades

1:00PM – 2:00PM, CC3 - 221

Cross-Cultural Communication and Skills

Directors from Global Brigades, invite students for a discussion on the impact they can make in global health and economic development.  Participants will gain an understanding of best practices and pitfalls of current intervention models and the funding models that are the difference in making international projects sustainable.

 

Negotiating through the Funk:  Using the tool of Racial Identity Development

Anthony Kelley & Sacha Nunn,  University of Washington Bothell

1:00 – 3:15 PM,  CC3 – 103

Ethnic, Racial, and Cultural Sensitivity

We as a blended community have to acknowledge both our historical significance and trauma that connects us. If we consider institutions that encourage the blending of our various communities like universities, we need practices that enable us to negotiate through the inevitable conflicts to arise. This workshop draws from a specific practice model that allows for communities to deal with the complexities of race and identity.

 

From Fear to Freedom: Ending Violence Against Women and Girls

Jun Chen, Michelle Zebrowski & Jessica M. Manfredi,  University of Washington Bothell

1:00PM – 3:15  P.M. CC3 - 235

Social Justice and Activism

Around the world, one-third of women have experienced some form of violence during their lifetime. However, they are often silent about their experience. This film viewing and workshop will create a safe space to honor the power of personal narrative to work towards eliminating gender based violence.

 

Leading the Way: Compassionate Listening & Interactive Theatre for Social Change

Sarah Zale,  Shoreline Community College

1– 3:15 P.M., CC3 – 123

Social Justice and Activism

This workshop will guide participants in the techniques of compassionate listening and interactive “forum” theater for non-actors. In a realistic yet safe atmosphere, “actors” and audience members have the opportunity to rehearse situations in order to build their communication skills and understand possible alternative behaviors within situations of institutional oppression.

 

Imagining the Future: Fostering

Gwen Ottinger,  University of Washington Bothell

1 – 3:15 P.M., CC3 - 223

Social Justice and Activism

Social justice through science fiction calls for a social justice that is often countered with, “that’s not realistic.”  Yet our biggest strides toward justice have come from arguably unrealistic but clearly articulated future visions.  To move beyond the constraints of realism, we will turn to fiction, writing imaginative futures that are socially and environmentally just.

 

Empowering University Students to Impact Global Health and Sustainable Development

Steven Atamian, Vanessa Lopez & Cole Hoover,  Global Brigades

1:00PM – 2:00PM, CC3 - 221

Cross-Cultural Communication and Skills

Directors from Global Brigades, invite students for a discussion on the impact they can make in global health and economic development.  Participants will gain an understanding of best practices and pitfalls of current intervention models and the funding models that are the difference in making international projects sustainable.

 

Developing Multicultural Competence: Engaging in an Intentional Journey

Dr. Erica Yamamura, Victoria Benavides, Sophie Boyer & Tracy Phutikanit

Seattle University

CC3 – 221, 2:15PM – 3:15PM

Social Justice and Activism

Developing multicultural competence is an intentional life long journey. This session will provide participants a reflective and interactive space to (1) examine and assess their multicultural competence and (2) examine agency in moving toward social justice outcomes in their own work which is imperative for 21st century leadership.