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For Advisors

General Education Requirements

General Education Requirements

There are six main components to the General Education Requirements at UW Bothell: English Composition, Additional Writing (W), Quantitative and Symbolic Reasoning (Q/SR), Foreign Language, Diversity  (DIV) and the Areas of Knowledge (AoK). The Areas of Knowledge are made up of Visual, Literary, and Performing Arts (VLPA), Individuals and Societies (I&S), and Natural World (NW).

Requirements for a Baccalaureate Degree

To graduate, a student must meet University requirements; college, school, or campus requirements; and department or program requirements. This section contains only University requirements. The graduation requirements for particular programs at the UW Bothell campus are explained in the catalog sections devoted to the academic programs.

Scholastic Standards Required

To be eligible for the baccalaureate degree, a student must earn a cumulative grade-point average of at least 2.00 for all work done in residence at the University. The graduation grade-point average is computed when the student has completed all work for the degree and includes only credits earned while in residence at the University.

Credits Required

To be eligible for graduation from the University, with the baccalaureate degree, a student must offer a minimum of 180 academic credits and satisfy all other specific requirements. The University of Washington Bothell has established minimum general education requirements for baccalaureate degrees. These minimum requirements are:

  • English Composition - 5 credits (A grade of 2.0 or higher is required)
  • Additional Writing - 10 credits
  • QSR - 5 credits
  • NW - 15 credits
  • VLPA - 15 credits
  • I & S - 15 credits
  • DIV- 3 credits

Each University of Washington Bothell program has established requirements that meet or exceed these minimum requirements.

English Composition Coursework From Semester Institutions

4-1/2- and 4-credit courses

An English composition course that transfers as 4-1/2 credits satisfies the requirement. A 4-credit English composition course from Western Washington University also satisfies the requirement. Any other 4-credit English composition course must be petitioned through the student's college Graduation Committee; these petitions are usually granted. If a 4-credit course is being used to satisfy the requirement, a DARS exception is necessary. The adviser can either submit the exception or send a request to dars@u.washington.edu.
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Duplicate courses

A student who has transfer credit for a particular English composition course and later wishes to take the equivalent course at UW Bothell (or accidentally takes the equivalent course at the UW) can have the transfer course changed to ENGL 1XX so that credit for both courses will count toward graduation. This is also possible with extension-credit courses, including College in the High School, and credit granted for AP test scores. (These will be changed to ENGL 999.) The student should make the request at the English undergraduate advising office.

Grade required

Courses taken to satisfy the English composition requirement must be passed with a grade of at least 2.0. Transferred courses must be passed with a grade of at least C.

Pass-fail

As of autumn 1985, courses taken at UW Bothell to fulfill any graduation requirement, including English composition, cannot be taken Satisfactory/Not Satisfactory (S/NS).

Transferred courses taken under a student-option pass-fail system may be counted toward English composition if taken before the student matriculated at the UW. These courses should be recorded with a grade of CR by the Admissions Office, and will be recognized as English composition by DARS. If a transfer course posted with an S grade should be counted as English composition, submit a request to the DARS office to allow the course to count.

Courses that were available only on a non-graded basis are automatically acceptable, whether taken before or after matriculation at UW Bothell. These courses will appear on the transfer evaluation with no grade; if you run a DARS, they will appear with a grade of T.

UW courses taken S/NS before matriculation at UW Bothell may also be used to satisfy the English composition requirement.

Spring 2001 TA strike

Because of the teaching assistant strike in spring quarter 2001, class assignments in many courses were not graded by the end of the quarter. Students who completed the assignments in English department courses were allowed to submit their assignments to the department; these students were awarded the grade Credit (CR). If the assignments were later graded, the student's numerical grade for the course was submitted and replaced the CR (if the student had not graduated in the meantime). Students who received a CR grade in an English composition course in spring 2001 are allowed to use the course to satisfy the English composition requirement.

Overlaps and restrictions

The course(s) used to meet the English composition requirement cannot also count toward the additional writing requirement or the Areas of Knowledge requirement. The course(s) used to meet the English composition requirement can also count toward the student's major, if applicable.

Starting in Spring 2009, students with composition (“C”) credit in English 111, 121, or 131 (i.e., students who receive a grade of 2.0 or higher in any of these courses) are prevented from enrolling in a second course in this series.

In exceptional cases, students will be able to petition the English department for permission to register for a second 111, 121, or 131 course. Students who have successfully completed ENGL 109/110 or any of the Interdisciplinary Writing Program courses (ENGL 197, 198, 199) will not be similarly restricted from enrolling in ENGL 111, 121, or 131.

Transfer students who have 10 or more credits of courses deemed equivalent to ENGL 111, 121, or 131 will not "lose" credit as a result of this change.
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Exemptions

Postbaccalaureate students

Students who have already completed a bachelor's degree at UW Bothell or elsewhere are exempt from the University (and Arts and Sciences) English composition requirement.

Proficiency tests

There is no test for exemption from the English composition requirement.
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Additional Writing

The Unversity of Washington Bothell has established an additional writing requirement of 10 credits, beyond the 5-credit English composition course required of all students. The 10 credits must be in "writing-intensive" courses; that is, either additional English composition courses or W courses.

The University-level additional writing requirement is either an additional composition course or two W courses.

Transfer courses

Transfer courses in English composition will usually transfer as a direct equivalent (for example, "ENGL 131"), or as ENGL 1XX. ENGL 1XX composition courses from Washington community colleges should be flagged by the Office of Admissions as English composition. Advisers may approve other courses, including those transferring as UW 1XX, if the primary purpose of the course was formal writing instruction. The adviser should post the C using the SRF330 screen. Note that creative writing and verse writing courses, which count as English composition courses at Washington community colleges, are counted by UW Bothell as neither composition nor W courses.
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W courses

W courses emphasize writing and provide students the opportunity to develop their writing skills within a particular discipline, such as history or biology. In W-prefix courses writing is an integral part of the course, contributing to the understanding and appreciation of the subject matter being taught. Writing takes place over an extended period of time, so that students receive feedback on their writing and have the opportunity to implement suggestions in later writing assignments--for example, by revising a major paper for subsequent evaluation or by writing several similar papers. See below for specific W-course criteria.

Posting UW W courses

Since winter 1995, We have been assigned to courses by departments using the W-course criteria described below. Departments add or remove a W from a course in the same manner as any other time schedule change, by making the change on time schedule work sheets, or by sending an email with the request to the Time Schedule Office. If a W is posted on a course through the seventh week of the quarter, the course will be posted on the students' records as a W course. After the seventh week of the quarter, the instructor should instead award a W to each student using the W circle on the grade sheet.

Before winter 1995, a list of approved W courses for each quarter was prepared by the Arts and Sciences W-Course Committee. If a W course offered before winter 1995 is not properly recorded on a student's transcript, contact Scott Winter at Undergraduate Advising.

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Transfer courses

Some local community colleges also use the W prefix and follow UW's W-course criteria. If there is a W in the course's title on the student's transcript, the admissions specialist who compiles the transfer evaluation should post a W on the transfer course. If the W wasn't posted by Admissions, the adviser can post it on SRF330.

All academic advisors may approve transfer courses that satisfy the W-course criteria. It's up to the individual adviser to decide whether to require any documentation; most advisers accept the student's description of the transfer course's writing assignments. Advisers unfamiliar with the W-course criteria may refer students to Undergraduate Advising. The W-course petition form, used to backdate Ws on UW courses, is not used for transfer courses.

To post a W on a transfer course, advisers use the SRF330 screen. Enter a W in the W field for the course and Send.

Grades required

Any passing grade in a writing-intensive course, including 0.7, is acceptable toward the additional writing requirement. As of autumn 1985, courses taken at UW Bothell to fulfill any graduation requirement, including additional writing, cannot be taken Satisfactory/Not Satisfactory (S/NS).

Transfer pass-fail courses

A transferred course taken under a student-option pass-fail system may be counted toward the additional writing requirement only if it was taken before the student matriculated at UW Bothell.

A transferred course that was available only on a non-graded basis is automatically acceptable, whether taken before or after matriculation at UW Bothell. The course should appear on the transfer evaluation with a grade of CR (rather than S).

UW courses taken S/NS before matriculation at the University of Washington granting the student's degree may also be used to satisfy the additional writing requirement. Back to top

Overlaps and restrictions

Courses taken to satisfy the additional writing requirement may also count toward any other graduation requirement, including the student's major, except no course may count toward both the English composition requirement and the additional writing requirement. A course's credits may, however, be split between those two requirements. For example, a student who transfers a 6-credit English composition course may use 5 credits to meet the English composition requirement and apply the remaining 1 credit toward the additional writing requirement.

Exemptions

Postbaccalaureate students

Students who have already completed a bachelor's degree at UW Bothell or elsewhere are exempt from the University (and Arts and Sciences) additional writing requirement.

Proficiency tests

There is no test for exemption from the additional writing requirement.

Transfer Associate Degree Agreement

Students who enter under the Transfer Associate Degree Agreement are not exempt from the additional writing requirement.

Registering for W courses

W courses are designated in the quarterly Time Schedule with the notation WRITING or OPTIONAL "W" COURSE.

Whether or not a course is a W course depends on the nature of the writing assignments, which can change from quarter to quarter and instructor to instructor. In fact, different sections of the same course in a given quarter may or may not all be designated W courses. For this reason, there is no list of permanent W courses.

Students and advisers can generate a list of open W courses using the General Education Course Requirement Search.
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Optional W courses

Some courses are designed so that students may, if they wish, complete additional writing assignments and earn a W for the course. For example, if the writing requirement is a major paper, students may be given the option of doing a draft and a revision to earn a W. Optional W courses are designated in the quarterly Time Schedule with the notation OPTIONAL "W" COURSE.

The instructor will indicate the students who completed the W requirement by marking the W circle on the grade sheet for each student at the end of the quarter.

Ws by special arrangement

Many students make special arrangements with an instructor to have a course count as a W course, even though it is not designated as a W course in the Time Schedule.

If a student is taking a course that requires extensive writing but is not posted as a W course, the student can discuss with the professor the possibility of earning a W for the course. The professor can award a W to an individual student in a course by marking in the W circle on the grade sheet. Or, as described above, the professor may decide to post a W on the course so that all students receive a W.

It is also possible for the student and the professor to make an arrangement in which the student will complete the extra work required to meet the W-course criteria. For example, a 10-page paper with no revision required is not sufficient to meet the W-course criteria; but a 10-page paper which is graded by the professor and then revised and resubmitted does meet the W criteria. Again, the professor awards the W on the grade sheet at the end of the quarter.

W-course criteria

A W course must require at least 10-15 pages of graded, out-of-class writing, in the form of a long paper with a required revision or two or more shorter papers.

  • Papers may be graded by professors, instructors, TAs, and/or readers.
  • Students should receive some feedback on their writing; that is, comments on papers should not be restricted to content only.
  • Revisions do not count in the total number of pages of writing. Typical writing assignments:
    • one 10-15 page paper with a required revision
    • three similar 5-page papers
    • two short book reviews and one longer paper
  • Take-home exams do not count toward the 10-15 page total, unless students are given ample time for thoughtful writing and revision, and exams are graded for writing (organization, clarity of expression) as well as content.
  • In-class writing does not count toward the 10-15 page total.
  • Creative writing and verse writing do not count toward the 10-15 page total.
  • Journals and annotated bibliographies do not count toward the 10-15 page total.
  • Papers may be written in foreign languages if the work is graded primarily for content and organization.
  • The amount of writing required for a W is not determined by the number of credits assigned to the course. These criteria apply to all courses, even those assigned only one or two credits.
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Quantitative and Symbolic Reasoning

The University of Washington Bothell requires 5 credits of Quantitative Symbolic Reasoning Q/SR.

Transfer courses

Q/SR courses require students to demonstrate competency in using mathematical or logical methods to solve applied problems. Transfer courses of 4 or more credits may count toward the Q/SR requirement if they are evaluated as exact equivalents of courses on the list, if they appear in the Equivalency Guide with a Q, or if they transfer as MATH 1XX or STAT 1XX (or 2XX, etc.). Advisers may approve other transfer courses of 4 or more credits if they are similar to courses on the Q/SR list. The adviser should post a "Q" on the course using the SRF330 screen.

Grades required

Any passing grade in a Q/SR course, including 0.7, is acceptable.

Pass-fail

As of autumn 1985, courses taken at the UW to fulfill any graduation requirement, including quantitative/symbolic reasoning, cannot be taken Satisfactory/Not Satisfactory (S/NS).

A transferred course taken under a student-option pass-fail system may be counted toward the Q/SR requirement only if it was taken before the student matriculated at UW Bothell.

A transferred course that was available only on a non-graded basis is automatically acceptable, whether taken before or after matriculation at UW Bothell. The course should appear on the transfer evaluation with a grade of CR (rather than S).

UW courses taken S/NS before matriculation at UW Bothell granting the student's degree may also be used to satisfy the Q/SR requirement.

Overlaps and restrictions

The course used to satisfy the Q/SR requirement may also count toward the Areas of Knowledge requirement and/or the student's major, when applicable.

Non-credit courses, such as MATH 098, cannot count toward the Q/SR requirement. (Note also that MATH 100, 102, 103, and 120 are not on the Q/SR list.)

Exemptions

Postbaccalaureate students

Students who have already completed a bachelor's degree at UW Bothell or elsewhere are exempt from the University (and Arts and Sciences) Q/SR requirement.

Transfer Associate Degree Agreement

A student who enters under the Transfer Associate Degree Agreement is not exempt from the Q/SR requirement solely on the basis of having earned the degree. The student must complete a course, either before or after transfer, from the Q/SR list.

Admission deficiency

A student is deficient in mathematics if s/he lacks the University admission requirement of three high school years (units) of college-preparatory mathematics. The courses (and the minimum required grade in each) which will remove a math admission deficiency are listed under Removal of a High School Subject Deficiency. Normally, a student must remove a math deficiency before matriculation at UW Bothell.

A passing score on a math placement test does not remove a math admission deficiency. Coursework is required.

Courses taken to remove high school core deficiencies may be taken S/NS. A course taken to remove a high school math deficiency may count toward the Q/SR (and/or AoK) requirement if the course is not a noncredit course, if it was taken for a grade, and if it appears on the Q/SR (and/or AoK) list.
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World Language

The University of Washington Bothell has no world language requirement, aside from the admission requirement of two years of one world language in high school.

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Transfer courses

The world language requirement is met by completion of any three-quarter or two-semester introductory world language sequence totalling at least 12 quarter credits. If a student has skipped part of the sequence, it is the level completed rather than the number of credits earned that is important. Transfer X credits (such as FRENCH 1XX) may be counted toward the world language requirement, if they represent language instruction and not courses devoted primarily to literature in translation or conversational practice.

A two-semester language sequence satisfies the requirement if sequence totals 8 semester credits (= 12 quarter credits). Normally, such a sequence should be posted as 101 (4), 102 (4), 103 (4). If you see one posted as 101 (5), 102 (5), 1XX (2), contact the Office of Admissions and ask that the evaluation be changed. DARS will not recognize a first-year language course as satisfying the foreign language requirement unless it is at least 4 credits and the student earned a grade of at least 2.0. If a student completed only the second semester of a language, it should be posted as 102 (2), 103 (4).

World language courses that transfer as UW 1XX must be flagged by an adviser as "F" using SRF330. Only the third quarter of the sequence needs to be flagged. Again, the course must be at least 4 credits and the student must have earned a grade of at least 2.0.

American Sign Language

American Sign Language (ASL) counts for admission, world language, and VLPA requirements in exactly the same ways as any other language. ASL is a language in its own right, and is different from Manual English, which does not satisfy foreign (i.e., non-English) language requirements.Back to top

Pass-fail transfer courses

The world  language requirement may be satisfied with a third-quarter or second-semester transferred course taken under a student-option pass-fail system only if the course was taken before the student matriculated at UW Bothell.

Courses taken as a nonmatriculated student

The world  language requirement may be satisfied with a third-quarter UW course taken S/NS if the course was successfully completed before the student matriculated at UW Bothell.

Placement and proficiency tests

University of Washington Seattle offers placement and proficiency testing. The Testing Center, 440 Schmitz Hall, offers placement tests in Spanish, French, Italian, German, Japanese, and Korean. The Testing Center also offers proficiency testing in Arabic, Russian, Persian, Polish, Portuguese, Hebrew, Urdu, and Hindi. For placement in other languages the student should contact the department. For proficiency testing in languages not offered at UW Bothell, see below. 
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Exemption by placement or proficiency test

Special proficiency tests are offered in Arabic, Russian, Persian, Polish, Portuguese, Hebrew, Urdu, and Hindi (by the Testing Center) and Chinese (by the Asian Languages and Literature department at University of Washington Seattle). A student who passes the test is exempt from the Arts and Sciences foreign language requirement. A student who wishes placement in Chinese should take the department's placement test, not the proficiency test.

The Testing Center notifies the Graduation and Academic Records Office and DARS, and subsequent DARS reports should indicate that the student has satisfied the requirement. There will also be a notation on SRF310 and on the student's unofficial transcript. The notification occurs automatically for students who took the placement test in winter quarter 2002 or later. A student who placed into the fourth quarter or higher before winter 2002 should contact the Testing Center, which will start the notification process.

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Continuing a world language taken in college

A student who already has college credit in a language may register for the next quarter of the language without a placement test. The student is also permitted to repeat a course or even start over with the first quarter, again without a placement test. Such a student may, of course, take a placement test if s/he chooses-as might be a good idea if, for example, the previous coursework was several quarters ago and the student wants to determine his/her current level in the language. In such a case the placement test score is not binding. When both a placement test score and posted courses in the language are available, the posted courses are used to determine eligibility. If the placement test score places the student higher than the posted college coursework, the student should contact the department offering the language for permission to enroll in the course.

Eligibility for placement tests

Except in the case of an applicant who needs testing to meet the University admission requirement, world language placement tests should be taken only after a student is admitted to the University of Washington Bothell.

High school duplication

The basic rule for disallowing credit in the language of admission is that after matriculation at UW, a student who had two or more years of a language in high school will not receive credit for beginning that language over again with the first course (e.g., SPAN 101, JAPAN 111).

The policy applies only to students who began college in autumn 1987 or later. If a student began college before then and has lost credit, the error should be pointed out to Admissions and/or Graduation and Academic Records. (Note, however, that the question of when the student began college is decided by Admissions according to official records of transferred credit, and does not follow the more liberal policy that Undergraduate Advising uses in determining whether students are allowed to use the pre-1985 proficiency requirement.)

First-quarter language courses taken before matriculation

In autumn 1996 the policy described above was changed to allow credit so long as the student had not matriculated at UW Bothell before the course was taken. The change is retroactive, but the records of students previously denied credit were not automatically updated. If an adviser notices that such a student should receive credit, the adviser should notify the Degree Audit Specialist at University of Washington Seattle.

Recording the grade

When credit for the beginning-level course is taken away the grade remains visible on the transcript, but is not calculated into the student's GPA.

Native speakers
Exemption from the graduation and/or admission requirement

For purposes of exemption from the world-language admission, a student is considered a native speaker of a world language if it was the language (or one of the languages) spoken in the home during the first six years of childhood and in which s/he received instruction in elementary school, through the seventh grade. Such students are exempt from the world-language requirement without taking a proficiency test. Students who immigrated too early in their school careers to meet the University's administrative definition of a "native speaker" may nevertheless be able to gain exemption by taking a test.

Starting with students admitted for winter quarter 2005, students who meet the University's definition of a native speaker will be coded so in the Student Data Base, and DARS will show that the student has satisfied the Arts and Sciences foreign language requirement. Prior to winter 2005, it was not always possible to tell from the information provided by the Admissions Office (screen 306 in the Student Data Base) whether a student met the University's definition, since the Admissions Office's focus was on recording at least one way in which the student met the foreign-language requirement for admission, rather than all ways. In these cases, the adviser may simply ask the student whether he/she attended school through the end of the seventh grade in his/her native language. Only if there is reason to doubt the student's word would it be necessary to ask for proof. Advisers should either make the exception or email the DARS (dars@u.washington.edu) office to have a notation added to the student's record that s/he is a native speaker of a specific language other than English.

If the student attended a school in which some of the instruction was in the native language and some was in English, the adviser should try to ascertain whether the student functioned as a native speaker in school, reading and writing in the language at the level of sophistication that might be expected if the school had been taught in that language only. The foreign-language requirement includes the assumption that a student should be able to read and write, as well as speak, a language other than English (at least at the level of a student who earns a 2.0 or higher in a 103-level college course). Students who did not finish seventh grade in their native language should be referred to the department offering the language for proficiency testing. If the University does not offer the language, or if there are unusual circumstances that might warrant special consideration, contact Undergraduate Advising.

Credit for courses in the native language

Native speakers of a language other than English are not normally allowed to earn credit for the first two years of college credits in their native language. Often they are allowed to earn credit at the third year and beyond; ultimately, however, the language department has the right to place the student at the appropriate level. Transfer credit for coursework in the first two years of the native language will be taken away by the Admissions Office. The enforcement of the restriction in UW courses (as well as the granting of exceptions for academically sound reasons) is the responsibility of the instructor and the language department. If the instructor allows the student to remain in the class without objection, credit will not later be taken away by the Registrar's Office. 
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Overlaps and restrictions

First-year world language courses cannot count simultaneously toward the world language requirement and Areas of Knowledge. In the language that is being used to meet the foreign language requirement, none of the 15-credit first-year sequence can be used toward Areas of Knowledge. Any additional credit beyond the first-year sequence can be counted for Areas of Knowledge, unless it is taken S/NS. This includes all credit at the fourth quarter and beyond, even if the student begins at that level. It also includes any supplemental credit at the first-year level, such as GERMAN 150 (conversation) or GERMAN 121, 122 (reading), which count for VLPA if the student has completed the 103 level of the language. (Credit for any course beyond the first year, except those designed primarily for conversational practice, also satisfies the world language requirement, even if the grade is "S" or is below 2.0.) For UW schools/colleges that do not require foreign language beyond UW Bothell admission requirement, any first-year world language instruction credits can be counted toward VLPA if the student completes the third quarter of the language. An exception is the College of Engineering, which does not allow VLPA credit for first- and second-quarter language courses.

Courses used to satisfy the world language requirement can also count toward the student's major, if applicable.

Transfer Associate Degree Agreement

Students who enter under the Transfer Associate Degree Agreement are not exempt from the world language requirement solely on the basis of having earned the degree. Students who have completed world language courses and counted them toward Areas of Knowledge for the associate degree will, after transfer to UW Bothell, need to count them toward the world language requirement instead (if their UW school/college requires world language). Because of this, such students usually need additional courses in Visual, Literary, and Performing Arts after transfer.

Students who enter under the Transfer Associate Degree Agreement who satisfy the world language requirement with coursework in one language (call it language A), or who are native speakers of a language other than English, can count toward VLPA any courses in a different world  language (call it language B) taken before transfer to UW Bothell-again, if the student satisfies the world language requirement with a different language than the one being counted toward VLPA. The student is allowed to count all world language B courses toward VLPA even if the community college allowed only some of the credits to count toward humanities.

Example: A student completes, as part of a transfer associate degree at a Washington community college, GERMAN 101, 102, 103 and FRENCH 101. The student then transfers to UW Bothell. The student uses the GERMAN to satisfy the world language requirement and can count the FRENCH 101 toward VLPA.

Postbaccalaureate students

Students who have already completed a bachelor's degree at UW Bothell or elsewhere are exempt from the world language requirement.

Admission deficiency

A student is deficient in world language if s/he lacks the University admission requirement of two high school years (units) of a single world language. Completion of any world language instruction course at the second-quarter level or higher, with any passing grade, will remove a world  language admission deficiency. Placement by UW Bothell into the third quarter of a world language will also remove a foreign language admission deficiency. For more information see Removal of a High School Subject Deficiency.

Courses taken to remove a high school deficiency may count toward the world language requirement. The first two quarters of a language taken at UW Bothell to remove admission deficiencies may be taken S/NS, but note that the third quarter of the language must be taken for a regular grade if it is to satisfy the world language graduation requirement. 
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The World Language Requirement: Students with Documented Disabilities

The University of Washington Bothell does not require additional World Language coursework after the student is admitted. If the student would like to petition the World Language Admissions requirement, the student may contact the Office of Admissions at University of Washington Bothell.

Students granted permission by the University at the time of admission

Very few students are admitted to the University without the world language Core Subject Requirement: high school coursework through the second-year level or college coursework through the second-quarter level. Of those few admitted with a foreign language deficiency, most are required to make up the deficiency by taking coursework at UW through the second quarter of a language (e.g., FRENCH 102). A small number of students admitted with deficiencies, however, are given special permission to substitute world-culture courses for foreign language courses because of deafness, speech impairment, or a certified learning disability. Decisions are made on the basis of documentation supplied by the student, together with a recommendation from the Disability Resources for Students office. The world language requirement is never simply waived; fulfillment by substitute courses is required.
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Petitioning

What to include in the petition

Petitions should be submitted on a Graduation Petition form and must include at least two items:

  1. A letter of endorsement of the documented disability, from the UW Bothell Disability Resources for Students office. Petitions submitted without this endorsement will almost certainly be denied.
  2. The proposed list of courses to be substituted for world  language, including course titles and a discussion of the intended theme of the combination. (See Focus, below.)

Number of credits required

For removal of an admission deficiency, 10 credits are required (even if the student did complete one year of language in high school).

Effect of previous language study on the number of credits required

Completion in high school of part of the two years of language study normally required for admission (for example, one year) does not decrease the number of college credits required to remove the admission deficiency. If the student were taking a language, s/he would presumably need to start over at the beginning and take 10 credits (101 and 102), so the required substitution is also 10 credits.

Areas of Knowledge

See separate page for areas of knowledge under degree requirements.