Local Government

City of Bothell

Bothell City Council

The Bothell City Council is a seven-member, policy-making body that governs city government. Each council member has equal decision-making powers and City Council meets three times each month (except August). All Bothell City Council positions are four-year terms. Council member positions are non-partisan, part-time positions.

Contact Bothell City Council here

(Chancellor Yeigh with City of Bothell Mayor, Joshua Freed)

City of Bothell News

City Hall Groundbreaking Ceremony Sept. 3

You're invited!
Celebrate the official start of the construction of Bothell's new City Hall on Wednesday, September 3 at 10 am on the site of the future City Hall, 18305 101st Ave NE, Bothell. The current City Hall was built in 1938.  Join City of Bothell leaders and project partners in breaking the ground for the City Hall that is expected to serve Bothell for the next 75 years.

Active public discussions, evaluation and planning for a new City Hall have been ongoing for the last decade. Located in the heart of Bothell's downtown, the City Hall and multi-use campus is a key element of the City's downtown revitalization plan that has already attracted over $200 million in private investment and is expected to stimulate an additional $450 million in private investment over the coming years.  Read more.

The Bothell City Council is a seven-member, policy-making body that governs city government. Each council member has equal decision-making powers and City Council meets three times each month (except August). All Bothell City Council positions are four-year terms. Council member positions are non-partisan, part-time positions.

Land Use and Zoning

The city of Bothell is the authority for land use and zoning regulation involving UW Bothell. In July 2014, City Council released an ordinance allowing for food trucks to do business in Bothell. Coordinating with local businesses, the UWB, and food truck vendors, the city created new regulation, removing old city code and adding new rules for how food trucks can operate in Bothell.

Food trucks had already begun serving the campus before the ordinance. However, since the ordinance was set in place, more food trucks have expressed interest in coming to campus as well as serving the rest of Bothell. You can find more inforamtion about Land Use and Zoning here.

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King County

The Metropolitan King County Council, oversees the second largest government and the most populous county in Washington State.  With two million residents, King County is the 14th largest county in the United States in terms of population.  Coincidentally, there are more people living in King County than in14 states!  At 2,134 square miles, the county covers more territory than the states of Rhode Island or Delaware.

As the legislative branch of county government, the Council sets policies, enacts laws, and adopts budgets that guide an array of services for this region, including:

  • the criminal justice system of prosecutors and public defenders, District and Superior Courts, juvenile detention and adult jails;
  • the King County Sheriff’s Office, which directly serves residents of unincorporated areas and contracts with many cities to provide police protection;
  • public health and human services;
  • Metro Transit bus service and county roads;
  • wastewater treatment and solid waste management;
  • regional parks, open space and trails; and
  • elections, records, and licensing.

Each of the nine members of the King County Council represents a geographical district of about 217,000 residents.  Councilmembers are elected on a non-partisan basis and serve four-year terms.  

Councilmembers are elected to one of nine geographic council districts and must live in the district they serve. Council members serve four year terms and the positions are non-partisan. Each Councilmember represents about 200,000 constituents.

More information about King County Council here

King County Council District 1, Rod Dembowski

(Chancellor Yeigh with King County Councilman, Rod Dembowski)

Rod is a life-long community volunteer, civic leader and highly respected attorney, recognized by Washington Law & Politics Magazine as a Super Lawyer and named six times as a “Rising Star” in our community. Born and raised in King County, he has spent a lifetime leading on issues from education funding to land use to transportation and transit. He brings a unique combination of public and private sector experience to bear in addressing the challenges facing our region

Contact:

Phone: 206-477-1001
Email: rod.dembowski@kingcounty.gov


Snohomish County

Snohomish County Council

The council's duties include identifying and articulating the needs of the citizens of Snohomish County, and providing a framework for county administration to carry out its work efficiently, ensuring that county government responds effectively to the community's needs. The county council adopts and enacts ordinances, resolutions, and motions; levies taxes; appropriates revenue; and adopts budgets for the county. The council confirms nominations to county boards and commissions and has concurrent authority with the county executive to nominate members to the Snohomish County Planning Commission. The council also appoints the hearing examiner.